Connect with us

Social Media

UpTier makes it easy to promote your Zillow listing with QR codes

Published

on

Should homeowners wish to promote their property listing on Zillow, now they can with the drop of a link or simply entering the listing ID. Print it, wear it, share it, the world of QR codes is growing.

UpTier also creates socially aware QR codes for anyone, simply enter your social usernames, and create. It’s free, and easy.

We’re not sure what the pay model will look like in the future, but this leads us to the ultimate problem with QR Codes no one is talking about but us, and that’s QR spam.

QR spam will most likely stop QR use in its tracks unless a guaranteed safe transaction is presented. In fact, unless I know exactly what is on the other side of a code, I will not scan it. Why wouldn’t I want to scan it? Because my phone is worth more than the convenience of the 50/50 chance I’m taking by scanning a Trojan horse or ad serve onto my handheld device. I, like many people, have been trained not to click on links if I do not know where they’ll take me, and QR codes are the future of spam links.

Mark my words, until a trust source is created that all QR codes are fed through, the investment of real money into QR codes for Realtors is a risky proposition. If I see the code on a Realtor’s sign, hard printed, I am more likely to trust the QR destination than I am on random things like paper items such as business cards.

In fact today, I received a QR code in an email from a trusted source, did I scan it? No, I did not, and you shouldn’t either.

This is nothing on UpTier, I’m sure their product is sound, but in the future if ad supported, then it’s spam, is it not? And what of NEWS of the first ever QR shared virus? The publicity alone will dead end the future of QR use.

Solution? Is it time for certified codes? If so, what does that even mean or look like?

QR Spam, it’s what’s cookin’.

Benn Rosales is the Founder and CEO of The American Genius (AG), national news network for tech and entrepreneurs, proudly celebrating 10 years in publishing, recently ranked as the #5 startup in Austin. Before founding AG, he founded one of the first digital media strategy firms in the nation and also acquired several other firms. His resume prior includes roles at Apple and Kroger Foods, specializing in marketing, communications, and technology integration. He is a recipient of the Statesman Texas Social Media Award and is an Inman Innovator Award winner. He has consulted for numerous startups (both early- and late-stage), has built partnerships and bridges between tech recruiters and the best tech talent in the industry, and is well known for organizing the digital community through popular monthly networking events. Benn does not venture into the spotlight often, rather believes his biggest accomplishments are the talent he recruits, develops, and gives all credit to those he's empowered.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Steven Noreyko

    February 28, 2011 at 1:51 pm

    Seems pretty paranoid to me. How would a QR Code inject a Trojan or other virus on to your mobile device? I’d like to know if it’s even possible.

    Most of the scanner apps I’ve looked at on iPhone will sandbox the QR Code text within the app, and then offer to send you to a browser or make a phone call, etc. Not sure what BlackBerry or Android users have to deal with here.

    Seeing SPAM is certainly a problem with QR codes, but if you scan the code, that content is more HAM (to you) than SPAM since you ASKED to see the content.

    I’m curious to watch what happens in this space

    • Benn Rosales

      February 28, 2011 at 2:09 pm

      It isn’t ham if your once no ad QR is now filtered with an ad to support the QR provider.

      Paranoid?
      Come on. Clicking YES or NO on your computer screen was one upon a time seen as safe. lol Shortened links once upon a time never sent you to a malicious site, and today QR codes are obviously safe. Sure.:) It’s evolution.

  2. Ralph Bell

    February 28, 2011 at 4:50 pm

    @Ben I use my own QR software on my server. I at least know that it will never have ads. But like everything else on the net someone will find a way to take an originally great idea and turn it into spam…Facebook, Twitter, bit.ly, etc. All have succumb to the evils of online marketing.

  3. Joe Cascio

    February 28, 2011 at 7:53 pm

    I think the previous commenter was not out of line in using the term paranoia. This article doesn’t point out any specific threat, exploit or vulnerability owing uniquely to QR codes. It mentions no actual instances where a QR code in and of itself was used to deliver a virus or malware payload. It doesn’t even theorize on a QR-specific vulnerability or threat vector.

    I did a little research on this topic and the only specific vulnerability regarding QR codes I found had to with, guess what… Windows ActiveX. And that was some years ago and has undoubtedly been rectified.

    Let’s look at the facts here. QR codes are merely data. You can’t put anything in a QR code URL that you can’t put in a URL that you publish on a web page. You can’t embed binary executable code in QR. A QR code doesn’t contain any threat that doesn’t already exist, as far as I can see. If you use iOS or Android, the phone will prevent the browser from installing or executing any code you didn’t specifically authorize or that comes from their app stores.

    But the point is, it’s no different from clicking a malicious link on a web page. If you take the proper precautions to protect yourself from malicious web pages, a QR code won’t hurt you either.

    If the author knows of a particular new or unique threat presented by QR codes, then he should state it and stop hand-waving. If he knows of or has heard of a case where a QR code was used as an exploit vector then he should give us what facts he has.

    QR codes may be new to the author and many others in the US, but they have been in use for years by the millions all over Japan and Europe. If there was some particular threat owing to their use, I presume we would have heard at least something about it by now.

  4. Stacy Chapman

    February 28, 2011 at 11:32 pm

    Interesting post Benn! We have been considering adding QR codes into our event ticketing software, and I really never considered the possibility of spam on the other side of the URL. I’m not sure if the thought of potential spam will sway me from scanning in the future, but it will definitely make me think twice if I don’t know the source.

    This past weekend, I actually scanned several QR codes on my phone from real estate signs and was excited at how easy I could get house data when a flyer was not present. The only frustration I saw from the scan was the slow speed it took to pull up a few of the websites that were driven entirely in Flash due to the high number of images and virtual tours.

  5. Dawn Green

    March 1, 2011 at 12:05 am

    Hey Benn, great article! We’ve been thinking that adding QR codes to our print-at-home PDF tickets was in a future upgrade, but you blind-sided me with this! Obviously, I’ll take a wait-and-see approach on this one.

    Thanks!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Media

Why Trump’s lawsuit against social media still matters

(SOCIAL MEDIA) Former President Trump snagged headlines for suing every large social media platform, and it has gone quiet, but it still deeply matters.

Published

on

trump sues social media

It was splashed across headlines everywhere in July: Former President Trump filed a lawsuit against social media platforms that he claims unrightfully banned him during and after the fallout of the January 6th capitol riots. The headlines ran for about a week or so and then fell off the radar as other, fresher, just-as-juicy news headlines captured the media’s eye.

Many of us were left wondering what that was all about and if anything ever became of it. For even more of us, it probably passed out of our minds completely. Lack of public awareness for these things is common after the initial media blitz fades.

Lawsuits like these in the US can take months, if not years between newsworthy milestones. The most recent news I could find as of this publishing is from August 24, 2021, on Yahoo! News from the Washington Examiner discussing the Trump camp’s request for a preliminary injunction in the lawsuit.

This particular suit shouldn’t be left to fade from memory in the shadows though, and here’s why:

In the past few years, world powers have been reigning in regulations on social media and internet commerce. The US is actually a little behind the curve. Trump may have unwittingly given us a source of momentum to get with the times.

In the European Union, they have the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), widely acknowledged to be one of the toughest and most thorough privacy laws in the world, a bold title. China just passed its own pair of laws in the past four months: The Data Security Law, which took effect on Sept. 1, and The Personal Information Law, set to take effect November 1st. The pair is poised to give the GDPR a run for its money for that title.

Meanwhile, in the US, Congress has been occupied with other things and, while there are five bills that took aim at tech monopoly currently on the table and a few CEOs had to answer some questions, little actual movement or progress has been made on making similar privacy protections a thing in the United States.

Trump’s lawsuit, while labeled by many as a toothless public relations move, may actually create momentum needed to push regulation of tech and social media forward in the US. The merits of the case are weak and ultimately the legislation that would give it teeth doesn’t exist yet.

You can’t hold tech companies accountable to a standard that doesn’t properly exist in law.

However, high profile attention and someone willing to continue to make noise and bring attention back to the subject, one of Trump’s strongest talents, could be “just what the doctor ordered” to inspire Congress to make internet user rights and data privacy a priority in the US, finally.

Continue Reading

Social Media

Even solopreneurs are doing live commerce online – it’s not just QVC’s game anymore

(SOCIAL MEDIA) When you think of watching a show and buying things in real time, it invokes thoughts of QVC, but social media video has changed all that.

Published

on

live commerce

After the year everyone has had, one wouldn’t be remiss in thinking that humanity wants a break from live streaming. They would, however, be wrong: Live online commerce – a method of conversion first normalized in China – is the next evolution of the ubiquitous e-commerce experience, which means it’s something you’ll want on your radar.

Chinese company, Alibaba first live streamed on an e-commerce site in 2016, allowing buyers to watch, interact with, and buy from sellers from the comfort of their homes. In 2020, that same strategy netted Alibaba $7.5 billion in presale revenue – and it only took 30 minutes, according to McKinsey Digital.

But, though western audiences have proven a desire to be just as involved with sellers during the buying process, live commerce hasn’t taken off here the way it has elsewhere. If e-commerce merchants want to maximize their returns in the next few years, that needs to change.

McKinsey Digital points out a couple of different benefits for organizations using live commerce, the main one being an influx in traffic. Live streaming events break the buying experience mold, and consumers love being surprised. You can expect that prospective buyers who wouldn’t necessarily visit your store under normal circumstances would find value in attending a live event.

Live events also keep people on your site for longer, resulting in richer conversion opportunities.

The sense of urgency inherent in in-person shopping doesn’t always translate to online markets, but having a stream showing decreasing inventory or limited-availability items being sold inspires people to act expeditiously rather than sitting on a loaded cart–something that can kill an e-commerce conversion as quickly as it starts one.

There are a ton of different ways to incorporate live events into your e-commerce campaigns. Virtual auctions are popular, as are markets in which individual sellers take buyers through inventory. However, the live event could be tangentially related–or even just something impressive running in parallel with the sale–and still bring in a swell of revenue.

Screen fatigue is real, and there isn’t a true substitute for a brick-and-mortar experience when done correctly. But if you have an e-commerce shop that isn’t utilizing some form of live entertainment–even just to bring in new buyers–you’re going to want to try this strategy soon.

Continue Reading

Social Media

LinkedIn is nixing Stories this month (LinkedIn had Stories!?)

(SOCIAL MEDIA) LinkedIn tried to be like the cool kids and launched “Stories,” but the video feature is being shelved and “reimagined.” Ok.

Published

on

linkedin stories

Creating the next big thing is essential for social networks to stay relevant, continue growing, and avoid shutting down. Sometimes, this leads to businesses trying to ride along with the success of another app’s latest feature and creating their cloned version. While the logic of recreating something already working makes sense, the results aren’t universal.

This time around, LinkedIn is saying goodbye to its short-lived Snapchat-like video product, Stories. In a company post, LinkedIn says it’s removing its Stories experience by the end of September.

Why is LinkedIn retiring Stories?

According to a post by Senior Director of Product at LinkedIn Liz Li, “[LinkedIn] introduced Stories last year as a fun and casual way to share quick video updates.”

After some testing and feedback, they learned this is not what users wanted. Seems like they could have beta tested with users and heard the same thing, but I digress.

“In developing Stories, we assumed people wouldn’t want informal videos attached to their profile, and that ephemerality would reduce barriers that people feel about posting. Turns out, you want to create lasting videos that tell your professional story in a more personal way and that showcase both your personality and expertise,” said Li.

What does this mean for users?

Starting on September 30, 2021, users will no longer be able to create Stories for Pages. If you’ve already planned to have an image or video ads run in-between Stories, they will now appear on the LinkedIn feed instead. For those who used Campaign Manager to promote or sponsor a Story directly from your Page, the company says “these paid Stories will not appear in the LinkedIn feed”, and the user will need to recreate the ad in Campaign Manager.

What’s next for LinkedIn?

According to Li, LinkedIn is taking what it learned from its finding to “evolve the Stories format into a reimagined video experience across LinkedIn that’s even richer and more conversational.” It plans on doing so by using mixed media and the creative tools of Stories.

“As we reimagine what is next, we’re focusing on how we can provide you with a short-form, rich interactive video format that is unique to our platform and that better helps you reach and engage your audiences on LinkedIn. We’re always excited to try out new things and learn as we go, and will continue to share updates along the way,” the company said.

Although Stories didn’t work well for LinkedIn as they hoped, one thing is for sure. LinkedIn isn’t giving up on some form of interactive video, and we can only hope they “reimagine” something unique that keeps users coming back for more.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!