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Learn to code by joining the military (really)

Let’s say the opportunity to learn coding in the or out of the Armed Forces was there all along. You just didn’t realize it…

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Military Salute

An invitation to military service

Having spent a good portion of my life in the military, I try to be a good ambassador to the Armed Forces. Peel away the veneer of servicemen and women being part of a special family or whatever other melodramatic rhetoric that seems to be thrown around these days and I’ll tell you a simple truth: The Armed Forces provides unparalleled opportunity. Serve your country, learn a skill, travel the world and get paid for it. More and more men and women enter the service with a degree already in hand and the job pool has kept with the times.

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So when I recently wrote about coding camps and the plethora of men and women all over the world taking part I had to ask myself if the military is keeping pace. I will venture a “Yes” and a “No.” Don’t take what I say as gospel but I think you can connect the dots and come up with a suitable answer.

IT and beyond

The Air Force in particular has remained pretty much on the cutting edge. Some of the current jobs, in particular cyber-security and computer systems programmer will get you pretty deep in to the IT scheme of things. Will you learn and write code? Check out this Air Force job skill description for Computer Systems Programmer:

[You will] “Write, analyze, design and develop programs that are critical to our war-fighting capabilities. From maintenance tracking programs to programs that organize and display intelligence data, they ensure we have the software and programs needed to complete our missions efficiently and effectively.”

The Army has a similar career track for an Information Technology Specialist. The job description reads as follows:

“Information technology specialists are responsible for maintaining, processing and troubleshooting military computer systems/operations. Job duties include maintenance of networks, hardware and software. Provide customer and network administration services in addition to constructing, editing and testing computer programs.”

Keep in mind that you are going to be sent to school to learn the things that you can immediately use to contribute to the Air Force mission at hand.

Once you are on the job you will continue to learn in order to stay up-to-date on current trends. You can take classes, and if that means pursuing a degree with a career track in coding and programming, then you’ll have that opportunity. No one is going to hand it to you. But the opportunity is there. You won’t work 24/7 regardless of what some people may have you believe, and if you choose to go back to your room or home or wherever and enroll in coding camp, that is your decision. I knew several individuals over the years who freelanced on the side in addition to their military jobs.

After you serve

Sooner or later you will get out of the military. After you contract ends, you have at your disposal the Post 9/11 GI Bill to go to school full time and study – in this case – computer science. As long as you go to a state college (many have good CS programs) and live frugally, you should be able to concentrate on school / internships for the three or four years it will take you to finish your Bachelor’s degree.

It’s easy to misconstrue the facts that the military is not living on the coding cutting edge. I’m fully convinced that they are. The problem, if you even want to call it that, is that this particular career track is not promoted nearly enough.

The opportunity is there whether you are active duty, or veteran, or even a spouse.

And one more thing

Some people get nervous about joining the active duty military, but I say don’t sweat it. You’ll make some of the best friends you’ve ever had, and you’ll get to see the world and learn how to operate in a large enterprise environment. The military teaches you a lot of intangibles that are hard to get elsewhere, as well as the obvious jobs skills. Until you sign on the dotted line, keep it in perspective.

#MilitaryCodingSchool

Nearly three decades living and working all over the world as a radio and television broadcast journalist in the United States Air Force, Staff Writer, Gary Picariello is now retired from the military and is focused on his writing career.

Tech News

This phishing simulator tests your company’s (lack of) readiness

(TECHNOLOGY) Phishero is a tool which tests your organization’s resistance to phishing attacks. Pro tip: Most companies aren’t ready.

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phishing simulator

In the wake of any round of cyberattacks, many organizations question whether they’re prepared to defend themselves against things like hacking or other forms of information theft. In reality, the bulk of workplace data thievery comes from a classic trick: phishing.

Phishing is a catch-all phrase for a specific type of information theft which involves emailing. Typically, a phishing email will include a request for sensitive data, such as a password, a copy of a W-4, or an account’s details (e.g., security questions); the email itself will often appear to come from someone within the organization.

Similar approaches include emailing a link which acts as a login page for a familiar site (e.g., Facebook) but actually stores your account information when you sign in.

Luckily, there’s a way for you to test your business’ phishing readiness.

Phishero, a tool designed to test employee resistance to phishing attacks, is a simple solution for any business looking to find any weak links in their cybersecurity.

The tool itself is designed to do four main things: identify potential targets, find a way to design a convincing phishing scheme, implement the phishing attack, and analyze the results.

Once Phishero has a list of your employees, it is able to create an email based on the same web design used for your company’s internal communications. This email is then sent to your selected recipient pool, from which point you’ll be able to monitor who opens the email.

Once you’ve concluded the test, you can use Phishero’s built-in analytics to give you an at-a-glance overview of your organization’s security.

The test results also include specific information such as which employees gave information, what information was given, and pain points in your current cybersecurity setup.

Phishing attacks are incredibly common, and employees – especially those who may not be as generationally skeptical of emails – are the only things standing between your company and catastrophic losses if they occur in your business. While training your employees on proper email protocol out of the gate is a must, Phishero provides an easy way to see how effective your policies actually are.

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Tech News

Domino’s asks Supreme Court to take up web accessibility case

(TECHNOLOGY) Domino’s is going all the way to the top to ask the Supreme Court to decide if ADA applies to their (and your) website.

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accessibility

As long as your company is following the rules and regulations set by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), customers with disabilities should be able to access your brick-and-mortar store. The ADA ensures that stores have parking spots, ramps, and doors wide enough for folks in wheelchairs.

But does the ADA also extend to your business’s website? That’s a question that the Supreme Court may soon have to answer.

As an increasing number of services and opportunities are found online in this day and age, it’s quickly becoming a question that needs answering. Several New York wineries and art galleries, Zillow, and even Beyoncé have been sued because their websites were unusable for people who are blind.

In 2016, Domino’s Pizza was sued by a blind customer who was unable to order a pizza on Domino’s website, even while using the screen reading software that normally help blind people access information and services online. The Ninth Circuit Court ruled that Domino’s was in violation of the ADA and that the company was required to make their sites and apps accessible to all. Three years later, Domino’s is petitioning SCOTUS to take on the case.

Domino’s argues that making their sites and apps accessible would cost millions of dollars and wouldn’t necessarily protect them or any other company from what their lawyer called a “tsunami” of further litigation.

That’s because the ADA was written before the internet had completely taken over our social and economic lives. While the ADA sets strict regulations for physical buildings, it has no specific rules for websites and other digital technologies.

The Department of Justice apparently spent from 2010 to 2017 brainstorming possible regulations, but called a hiatus on the whole process because there was still much debate as to whether such rules were “necessary and appropriate.”

The Domino’s case proves that those regulations are in fact necessary. UsableNet, a company that creates accessibility features for tech, reports that there were 2,200 court cases in which users with disabilities sued a company over inaccessible sites or apps. That’s a 181 percent increase from the previous year.

While struggling to buy tickets to a Beyoncé concert or order a pizza may seem like trivial concerns, it’s important to consider how much blind people could be disadvantaged in the modern age if they can’t access the same websites and apps as those of us who can see. Christopher Danielsen from the National Federation of the Blind told CNBC that “If businesses are allowed to say, ‘We do not have to make our websites accessible to blind people,’ that would be shutting blind people out of the economy in the 21st century.”

If the Supreme Court decides to take the case, it could set an important precedent for the future of accessibility in web design.

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Tech News

Slack video messaging tool for the ultra lazy (or productive) person

(TECHNOLOGY) Courtesy of a company called Standuply, Slack’s notable lack of video-messaging options is finally addressed.

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slack video updates

Slack — the popular chat and workflow app — is still going strong despite its numerous technical shortcomings, one of which is its notable lack of native video or audio chat. If you’re an avid Slack user, you might be interested in Standuply’s solution to this missing feature: video and audio messaging.

While it isn’t quite the Skype-esque experience for which one might hope when booting up Slack, Standuply’s video messages add-on gives you the ability to record and send a video or audio recording to any Slack channel. This makes things like multitasking a breeze; unless you’re a god among mortals, your talking speed is significantly faster than your typing, making video- or audio-messaging a viable productivity move.

The way you’ll record and send the video or audio message is a bit convoluted: using a web browser and a private Slack link, you can record up to five minutes of content, after which point the content is uploaded to YouTube as a private item. You can then use the item’s link to send the video or audio clip to your Skype channel.

While this is a fairly roundabout way of introducing video chat into Slack, the end result is still a visual conversation which is conducive to long-term use.

Sending video and audio messages may feel like an exercise in futility (why use a third-party tool when one could just type?) but the amount of time and energy you can save while simultaneously responding to feedback or beginning your next task adds up.

Similarly, having a video that your team can circle back to instead of requiring them to scroll through until they find your text post on a given topic is better for long-term productivity.

And, if all else falls short, it’s nice to see your remote team’s faces and hear their voices every once in a while—if for no other reason than to reassure yourself that they aren’t figments of your overly caffeinated imagination.

At the time of this writing, the video chat portion of the Slack bot is free; however, subsequent pricing tiers include advanced aspects such as integration with existing services, analytics, and unlimited respondents.

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