Connect with us

Tech News

Squarespace Logo launches to praise and vehement opposition

(Tech News) Squarespace Logo launches to mixed reviews, with designers mocking the tool, and others mocking the designers. Maybe it’s just a useful tool?

Published

on

squarespace logo

Squarespace Logo launches, stirs controversy

Squarespace is known for making high-end web design accessible to entrepreneurs and small businesses better than most of their competitors. This week, they launched Squarespace Logo, a simple, minimalistic online logo designer to accompany their existing suite of tools. The launch caused quite a stir in the graphic design community which reacted vehemently, particularly through social networks.

bar
The drag and drop tool was mocked by designers as a bad concept. Paul Wright at RubberCheese.com said, “I often think ‘it would be cool to be a pilot.’ In my spare time, I’ll play a computer game on a machine which allows me to fly around and pretend to be one. It’s great fun, but if you was to put me in the pilot seat of a real plane, I would just crash and burn. Most people believe they have a bit of creativity in them, but it doesn’t mean they are designers, and they certainly shouldn’t pretend that they are.”

Wright sounds exactly like many, many other designers who aired their grievances online, and it is understandable, as some saw it as a threat. But not all designers mocked the tool, which is interesting given the rise of the logo design contest websites, Fiverr.com and the like, but perhaps the fact that so many designers host their websites through Squarespace, they felt disintermediated and betrayed. That makes sense.

And then the mocking designers were mocked

But maybe it’s actually helpful?

Some designers supported the tool

Tina Roth Eisenberg is a Swiss designer in Brooklyn who opines in her industry blog, “Never forget: The web is a place of abundance. There will always be folks that appreciate the importance of a custom tailored brand. So, designers, take a deep breath. It’s all good. There’s a place for basic tools like Squarespace Logo *and* for your craft.”

Eisenberg adds, “And, next time we want to ridicule someone else’s labor of love, let’s all remember this great talk by Jason Santa Maria [below].”

The American Genius is news, insights, tools, and inspiration for business owners and professionals. AG condenses information on technology, business, social media, startups, economics and more, so you don’t have to.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. dcphoto

    January 27, 2014 at 11:15 am

    …seen it all before in the photography field… once upon a time there were commercial photographers that would make a living with assignment work. Content aggregators came in and licensed millions of images from photographers who missed reading the details of these deals. Their work now is a commodity, diluted in the sea of millions of lesser work… Few of these photographers remain gainfully employed. The ones that do now see photography as a second job. Now that the standards have been lowered Stock agencies do not worry about a lack of photography talent… To the rescue Flickr and other social media sites that provide C class photography at the right price (free).

    Creativity dies when it is sold in bulk. The very people that make the tools (Adobe, SquareSpace, etc) are the ones that see a short term opportunity in displacing creative talent and selling their wares by the container. In a world of competition there is little space for arguments like “there will be discerning customers willing to pay for talent” – NO. These discerning customers live in a competitive environment and they cannot afford to do the right thing if that raises their costs and jeopardizes their competitiveness.

    It is up to designers, photographers, artists and the associations and groups that represent them to send a message and start doing something about this. My guess is that will never happen since they operate as small islands. The increasingly rare fruits of their creations will become extinct.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tech News

Hardware tokens are what folks serious about avoiding hackers use

(TECH) Hardware tokens have been around for a while, but people most serious about avoiding hackers swear by them.

Published

on

hardware token

How many passwords do you have? How many sites do you use each of your passwords for? Information Today research estimates over half of all adults have five or more unique passwords, while one in three adults have 10 or more unique passwords that have to be remembered.

This particular study was from 2012. I’d wager that most of us use many more passwords today than we did just six years ago. With the risk of your accounts being hacked increasing, you might be wary – you might not even trust an online password manager.

If you struggle with remembering all of your passwords and want to make sure you are managing passwords and protecting your accounts, you might want to consider a hardware token.

What is a hardware token?

This piece of hardware is a physical device, similar to a USB drive, that lets you gain access to an electronically restricted resource. It’s actually a simple two-factor authentication source.

Once your account is set up to accept the hardware token, you log in to the account with your user ID and password. You’ll be asked to insert the hardware token into the device, which gives you access to your account. It’s another layer of protection and authentication.

Hardware tokens have been on the market since 2002. Although many use the USB port on your device, Bluetooth tokens and smart cards are other types of hardware tokens. Setting up a hardware token is fairly easy. You can use your hardware token with most websites that have two-factor authorization.

The challenges with hardware tokens is that they are very easy to lose and can easily be stolen. That’s a pretty significant downside.

The YubiKey, one of the current offerings on the market, costs about $50. It could be expensive to have a hardware token for everyone in your organization. Google Titan, another brand of hardware key, costs about the same.

Some argue that not everyone needs this much security, but those people probably have never been hacked. If it protects your accounts, it might be worth taking a look.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Amazingly fun tech toys that are secretly educational

(TECHNOLOGY) STEM toys for children are fun *and* educational – here are some that have caught our eye.

Published

on

STEM tech toys for kids

There’s a new trend amongst startups – and amongst kids’ toys: educational playthings that teach your little ones STEM skills like programming and coding.

Toys that double as learning tools are nothing new, but digital, connected technology still is, and so is the idea that your toddler can get a leg up in the tech industry by getting an early start.

Parents, universities, and economists seem concerned that acquiring STEM skills will soon be the only way to guarantee a good job, despite reports from the U.S. Census Bureau that 3 out of 4 STEM majors end up in non-STEM fields anyway.

So if your kid is more into, say, baseball or dancing than computers, you might be wasting the pretty pennies these high-powered educational toys will cost you.

Kids, with their alarmingly short attention spans, are as likely to toss these toys back into the toybox as any other. But if your wee one seems to have a knack for all things technical – or if you’d just rather see them learn how to build a device than passively stare at one all day – then check out TC’s guide to STEM toys.

Even though these toys are marketed towards the younger set, I found myself a little envious, wishing I could take a few for a test drive – especially since many of them are modern, high-tech reboots on old standbys from my childhood.

Lego’s Boost Creative Toolbox uses the same classic Lego blocks, but allows you to animate and program your creations.

Several products cross-market with some of my childhood favorites; Dash Robotics has teamed up with Mattel to make Jurassic World robots, and Kano makes a Harry Potter Coding Kit that teaches kids to program a wand that can interact with digital content. There’s even Electro Dough which is basically electrically-conductive Play-Doh that can light up and make sounds. I want!

In fact, a lot of the toys combine arts ‘n’ crafts with STEM lessons. Adafruits makes a marker with electronically conductive ink that can light up circuits and interact with computer programs, and an electronic pencil that synthesizes music. Root Robotic’s little bot can draw pictures and compose songs.

For the more straightforward tech nerds, Makeblock, Evo, Robo Wunderkind, and Wonder Workshop all make programmable robots – a big step up from the “artificially intelligent” Furby’s of my childhood. Sphero’s Bolt is a ball-shaped robot, while Airblock makes a programmable hovercraft.

There’s the Pi-top Modular Laptop that teaching kids coding, and there are even opportunities for kids to build their own electronics; Kano offers a build-it-yourself computer.

The holidays are just around the corner – but whether STEM educational toys will be the next Tickle Me Elmo remains to be seen.

Continue Reading

Tech News

This AI program wants to be your graphic designer

(TECH NEWS) If you’re a small business looking for branding or to re-brand but don’t have the time nor budget, this tool can help you get it done!

Published

on

brandmark

AI is growing, now it can even be your own personal graphic designer.

The new company Brandmark uses AI to create custom brand identities in minutes. All you need to do is describe your business and leave the designing up to them.

Brandmark describes their system as “more than just a logo,” as they aid people in developing an entire brand identity. This includes a complete style guide, color scheme and even a WordPress compatible website template.

It is the perfect tool for small businesses and entrepreneurs who may not have the budget to hire an in-house designer to join their team.

The creators of Brandmark have attempted to give the platform personal elements as well, so that you can understand the design decisions and even have the chance to make it your own.

The process is as simple as it can get. All that Brandmark requires is for you to type in a few keywords that best describe your business. For example, a coffee shop might type in “coffee, hot, lounge, mocha, books, relaxation.” These keywords are anything that can be associated with your brand so it is important to include adjectives as well. Consider how you want customers to feel when they see your product or walk into your shop for the first time.

All of these details will help Brandmark create a unique and personal identity for you.

The creators of the tool wanted it to feel like a true designer. That is why they have developed a system that understands design principles. After creating a look, Brandmark will explain the design choice and how it relates to your brand. In addition, you have access to features that allow you to customize the design.

Just like any professional service, Brandmark provides a style guide that can be used to apply your brand - including logo, color scheme and font - to various type of products. Click To Tweet

For instance, the same coffee shop would know how to apply their logo to coffee cups, bags, mugs and menus by following the guide. In addition, website layouts are offered to get your online business started. It’s an all-in-one package to get your business up and running with a professional look.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!