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Why young professionals getting work-related tattoos isn’t idiotic

(EDITORIAL) Some young professionals are now getting work-related tattoos done even if that job isn’t permanent – why?

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A brief history

In 1954, famed Chicago advertiser Leo Burnett had a client with a problem. Marlboro cigarettes were a staple of the market for decades, but they were losing ground with men. Their previous advertising campaigns focused on the notion that Marlboro cigarettes were safer because they were filtered. In the mindset of the times, a safer cigarette was considered to be a woman’s cigarette. Market research indicated men would consider a filtered cigarette, but were ashamed to be seen smoking what they considered to be a “woman’s cigarette.”

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Burnett’s group decided to give the brand a masculine image. They avoided all claims about health, instead focusing the public’s attention on what they perceived to be the bastions of masculinity. A variety of masculine images were paraded in front of the public: construction workers, businessmen, sailors, and soldiers, among others. All were featured with a very visible tattoo on the backs of their hands, thus sublimating the image of the tattoo with masculinity.

Rough ‘n’ tumble

The tattoo was the center of subsequent campaigns until marketers noticed an overwhelming positive response to the images containing a cowboy. The tattoo was dropped from sight, the cowboy moved front and center, and the “Marlboro Man” was born.

If it hadn’t been for the cowboy, though, we’d continue the association of the tattoo with its perception in the 1950’s: masculine, rough and tumble, and not for the faint of heart.

And now: the work tat

Times have indeed changed, though. Flash forward 60 years and the tattoo is not considered the image of the outlaw, but a mainstream accessory for both men and women alike. Having a visible tattoo in many professions is no longer considered taboo or an automatic bar to employment in many professional fields.

In fact, some young professionals are now getting work-related tattoos.

As Anna Davies notes, the pieces are significant to the individual. The tattoos are a marker of a surprising success, or of where they spent the formative years of their professional career.

“I know I want to get a tattoo, and I’m absolutely thinking of getting a logo of my company,” says Leanne Weekes, a Miami-based publicist, speaking to Davies.

“It would be a private reminder of all of the times I could have or should have given up. To remember always the community of people who took a chance on a humble graduate with big dreams.”

This isn’t just a solo decision. Many work groups are getting inked together to celebrate or commemorate as a team.

Help or hinder

So, a good idea or not? As with any permanent modification to one’s body, it’s something that you should do for you. What you do with your body is your choice, and your choice alone. Reflect on which images and placements are meaningful to you. Once you’ve made certain that you’re totally comfortable with the idea, make sure that your employer and/or your profession are as well, especially if the location of the tattoo is visible when you’re in professional dress.

While many employers and professions have relaxed prohibitive rules against visible tattoos, many are stricter.

Even if the rules might be off the books, there may be lingering unspoken ones that could quietly derail your career.

You don’t want a celebration of your work today to prevent you from continued advancement in days ahead.

If you’re gonna do it…

Don’t be afraid to take your design to several tattoo shops to make certain the artist is comfortable with your ideas and can execute them to your satisfaction in an attractive and sanitary fashion.

You don’t want to turn what’s meant to be an eternal reminder of a crowning professional achievement into an Internet meme due to poor artisanship, or worse, live with an infected mess.

Be proud of yourself and your achievements, and wear your tattoo with pride. In darker moments that may be ahead, it’s always good to have a reminder of the amazing work that you’ve done in the past with or without colleagues, and know that you’re going to do the same again in the future. You’ve worked hard, had fun, and want to remember the wins and the people who earned them with you forever. Inking up is a fantastic way to keep those memories close at hand.

#WorkTats

Roger is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds two Master's degrees, one in Education Leadership and another in Leadership Studies. In his spare time away from researching leadership retention and communication styles, he loves to watch baseball, especially the Red Sox!

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Artificial intelligence wants to improve your resume

(TECHNOLOGY) Artificial intelligence can do everything from drive a car to improve your resume – we’re movin’ on up!

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skillroads artificial intelligence resume builder

Remember the career service office in college, who gave you your first lesson on resume writing? Or maybe you remember the coaching company who helped you tweak your cover letter and professional story for a career change?

Now, imagine all those experiences automated by artificial intelligence (AI). Seems farfetched? It’s closer than you think.

Enter Skillroads, an “AI career service to help you land a dream job.” This tool acts as a new resume builder, a current resume evaluator, and a cover letter builder, to set you up with the most optimal job app documents.

The resume builder takes your desired position, and a questionnaire outlining your experience, and a list of your skills and turns it into a resume for you. Powered by “smart data sourcing and natural language,” Skillroads turns those inputs into “strengths and skills that suit you best,” likely by matching your skills with desirable keywords.

That same technology fuels the “smart resume check.” You can upload your current resume, and the tool will grade it on ATS (applicant tracking systems) compatibility, formatting, and sectioning, among other things. In addition to the quantitative scores, the tool offers steps to fix and improve the document.

Once your resume is ready, next up is the Cover Letter Builder. Using your resume details, Skillroads automatically identifies key competencies to address in the letter, then builds the language and story using best writing practices.

The tool itself wants to appeal to users targeting Fortune 500 Job Opportunities, as the tool also incorporates a search engine for jobs at those companies. The tool can match the documents it creates with open opportunities, to save people time during the job hunt.

So, how does it stack up to a resume writing service?

A human review can give you different perspectives from different people; unless all such perspectives are accounted for in an algorithm, you may not receive the most comprehensive audit possible. Furthermore, you can’t get feedback on things like in-person interview or phone screen performance from an algorithm. Not yet, anyways.

While a human review is still superior, this is a good first step to integrate artificial intelligence into a algorithm-oriented job application environment.

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Cope Notes: cheeky low-commitment mental health tool for all

(TECH NEWS) Mental health apps can be hard to find, harder to use, and even harder to remember without inundating, annoying alerts. Cope Notes is the perfect solution.

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I recently went searching for some mental health apps and it was a sea of garbage, if I’m being honest. I finally found a meditation app that was kind of cool, but after I figured out how it worked, I mostly spent time on videos of a gal cussing, but not for meditation value, but humor. I deleted the app.

I’m not in a dark place right now, but I work in a fast paced, high stress world, and maintaining focus and mental health is my competitive advantage, and one I take very seriously. But so many of the tools available are overpriced, overly complicated, or short on value.

About 12 hours after I had given up and decided to stick to my current regimen, without the help of any tech, a former Staff Writer reached out to update me on what he’s up to, and it was so timely… Cope Notes.

Put simply, it’s 20 randomly-timed text messages per month. You don’t know when they’re coming, but they’re exercises, encouragement, and witty advice. Finally, something that doesn’t put all of the work on me as a user.

And I’m not surprised – creator Johnny Crowder is young, but has long been a mental health advocate, and very sincere about it. He used to write here at AG in between tours and gigs as a famous straight-edge metal musician (I had no idea what that was prior to connecting with Crowder). He is a talented creative that has a lot of people looking up to him, so what better way to use that spotlight than for good?

“I just don’t want people to get so frustrated searching for solutions that they give up on healing altogether,” said Crowder. “It’s not clinical, it’s not complicated, it’s not confusing. It’s for people who feel great, people who feel rotten, and everyone in between.”

What we love about the creation of the app is that Crowder has suffered his own challenges, and instead of just complaining about an option he says he would have truly benefited from in his past, he took action.

Cope Notes is far different from any solution we’ve seen in that it speaks our language – cheeky, never condescending, and disarming, never douchey.

And because it’s done over text, it doesn’t require you to run an app in the background or remember to turn it back on, giving you a better chance at successfully using it (instead of forgetting which is my biggest fault).

“It took me years to find and hone the coping strategies that I rely on every day to keep me happy and healthy,” said Crowder. “Now that I finally figured out what works, I want to save people from the discouragement and disappointment of scrambling for solutions and fast-track their growth.” Every text is written by Crowder himself.

New users can enjoy a seven-day free trial by visiting copenotes.com/subscribe or texting COPE to 33222. After the trial period, subscribers pay $9.99 per month, with discounts applied to six-month and one-year subscriptions, and no set-up or cancellation fees.

The service also offers an option to purchase and personalize gift subscriptions for friends or family members in need, so check out Cope Notes today for you or a loved one.

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Tech News

Smartphone addiction is killing social norms, physically hurting us

(TECHNOLOGY) Smartphone addiction is increasingly common, and it’s not just manners that we worry about, it’s the physical impact and erosion of social norms that are also a result.

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Sorry, just checking something. Sorry, just need to quickly respond to this text. Sorry, just turning on low power mode. Sorry, just addicted to my phone and compulsively check it even when spending time with family and friends.

Have you ever experienced any of the following?

  • Eyes burning from staring at a screen for hours
  • Your attention span is totally shot and you find yourself in an endless loop checking apps, messages, and social media
  • Curled up in an uncomfortable ball on the bathroom floor for half an hour checking a dumb app, trying to decide if you want to be patient or spend real money
  • Asking your friends to tell you’re not allowed to spend real money on said stupid app

If you answered yes to any of these, you’re probably addicted to your phone.

If you answered yes to all of these, are you me?

I know it’s time for me to get rid of an app when I start making charts optimizing the game. Or when my arm starts to feel like I’m getting carpal tunnel syndrome twenty years too soon. My motivation to write my college thesis was to academically justify all the time I spent checking Snapchat while on family vacation.

Turns out, my phone addiction has more physical consequences than I was previously aware. On average, human heads weigh 10-12 pound. Our neck muscles are super tough since most of the time, we’re holding our heads upright.

Except when we bend our necks to check Instagram, or compose a text. When we bend down, the gravitational pull of our head increases pressure on our necks to nearly 60 pounds. Which, you know, isn’t great for our spines either.

Posture affects your mood, and can even impact behavior and memory. Frequently slouching alters your energy levels, bone development, and your oxygen intake, which can lead to depression. And if you’re already depressed, you were probably slouching anyways.

Add the negative impact overuse of phones can have on social interaction, and you’ve got a recipe for a lot of really unhappy people even more drawn to digital devices.

According to the Pew Research Center, 75 percent of Americans don’t think smartphone use hinders their attention in a group setting.

But as we stare more at screens instead of people, nonverbal cues get lost.

There’s a disengagement, even if you happen to be texting or playing virtual games with whoever is in the room with you. For children, loss of nonverbal cues due to constant phone use or competition for attention with their parents’ phone use can even stunt development.

As a writer, the lure of communicating with my phone is nearly irresistible since I can spend time working and reworking messages. However, social scientist Sherry Turkle’s decades of studies on family interactions and technology suggest that obsession with devices has created a generation afraid of spontaneity from organic interactions.

Receiving a phone call can spike anxiety, and forget about trying to interact with a stranger in the grocery store line. Knowing how much easier it is to type a message than deal with someone face to face can make analog interactions nerve-wracking.

Yet at the same time, the feeling of always being reachable and always “on” brings another kind of anxiety to the table.

According to a 2015 Pew Research center report, 24 percent of teens are “almost constantly” online, and a Nielsen report found adults spend around 10 hours per day consuming electronic media.

If someone doesn’t respond to your text and you know they always have their phone with them, does that mean they’re mad? If you forgot to respond to a message from someone, will they take it as a personal offense?

While smartphones and social media aren’t necessarily harbingers of evil, we’re all affected physically, emotionally, and socially by our use, particularly overuse.

Manner and etiquette experts point out the obvious: spend more time with people in the room than on your phone. However, that’s easier said than done. Especially considering Facebook’s recent admission that the platform was specifically designed to be as addicting as possible.

Even without confessions from other sites and apps, that’s kind of their goal: revving up your dopamine with an addicting platform. So it’s understandable that there’s a drive to check your phone every few minutes (or seconds.)

However, change comes in baby steps. Try to be more mindful of how often you’re checking your phone, and when you’re checking it.

Henry Alford, author of “Would It Kill You to Stop Doing That: A Modern Guide to Manners” suggests making a point to not be the first person in your group to pull out a device.

It’s a small thing, but can at least help delay the eventual waterfall of everyone else bringing out their phones once one person breaks the seal. If you’re really struggling with phone addiction, there are apps that track how often you unlock your phone and spend time on apps.

That may be a reality check, especially if you’re checking your phone hundreds of times a day in the absence of reason. Make an effort to have more face-to-face conversations, and if nothing else, at least keep your phone stashed while you’re driving.

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