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Remote company Zima says that remote jobs are the way of the future

(BUSINESS MARKETING) Remote working has been increasing over the years, even with it’s success there are worries about if it is sustainable. One company says absolutely

remote worker

It’s no secret that remote working has increased across all industries over the last few years. It seems we’ve – somewhat – moved past the misconceptions of remote workers just being people who “work” from their couch while in their pajamas watching Netflix.

However, there is still some raised eyebrows about the concept of remote working. Chief Growth Officer and co-founder of Zima Media, Michael Zima, has run across some of this skepticism, as his marketing company is run 100 percent remotely.

“When you say that you are “remote,” there is an automatic backlash that you are just “outsourcing” with a ribbon on top,” said Zima. “I don’t know when being a “digital nomad” became more prestigious than working from home as a remote worker.”

According to a recent report by Fiverr, about seven percent of the workforce in the United States would be considered freelance, with the cities most active in the freelance game being New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago. This number, Zima thinks, is likely higher due to the fact that you technically only need to be connected to the Internet outside of the office to be considered working remotely.

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When combatting the non-believers in remote working, Zima uses a variety of methods. “The most significant point we stress to counteract it is we are doing work in an office setting at home or in a co-working space,” said Zima. “We are not surfing somewhere or taking selfies about how great we are in life. That is something reserved for a vacation, and I cannot connect play and work because I prefer to keep them separate.”

He also says that there are cost-savings galore when choosing to run a remote business. Not only are you saving on things like commuting, you’re also saving on overhead costs by not paying for an office space.

“The client received the cost-cutting benefits that are usually marked up by a business with a physical location, and this makes mutual business sense,” explained Zima. “This is the most disruptive development that is emerging from remote workers — counteracting this trend maps back to arranging deck furniture on the Titanic because the labor force goes remote in the coming years will continue to surge.”

Past the fact that his employees work remotely, Zima asserts that everything is business as usual in terms of operations. They have standard means of communication, such as email, a shared-communication platform, and Skype. In addition, how the leader works remotely sets the trend for his employees.

“The biggest drawback that crosses everyone’s mind at the beginning of being remote is job security. When you walk into an office and see dozens and even hundreds of smiling (I hope) people you know that you are a part of something more substantial,” said Zima.

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“Connecting with a company is essential, and when you are on the other side of the laptop, it’s hard to fathom all of this working out. It’s a genuine threat even when you become established because the way we work is still foreign to remote workers. When we stop measuring remote workers by the traditional office worker standard, it will free up some of the bias a remote worker may have. It’s a trend that has no rulebook, no guide, and almost unlimited upside to be your boss and stay true to your identity.”

At the end of the day, Zima’s mantra which includes five points: be accountable, be a self-starter, improve communication, manage tasks better, and make time for work and life.

This has proved to be successful for Zima, who has been working with his business partner for over four years, and the two have yet to meet in-person.

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Staff Writer, Taylor Leddin is a publicist and freelance writer for a number of national outlets. She was featured on Thrive Global as a successful woman in journalism, and is the editor-in-chief of The Tidbit. Taylor resides in Chicago and has a Bachelor in Communication Studies from Illinois State University.

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