Connect with us

Business News

A job seeker’s guide to SXSW – prep tips, hacks, & shortcuts

Published

on

sxsw

“You won’t find a job this year at SXSW,” said Sarim Q, better known as tech.romantic in NYC. “The jobs will find you – that’s just the nature of the festival turned beast, that engulfed half a million attendees last year from all over the globe.”

Sarim is a creative coach for those in the tech, art, and entrepreneurial spaces. In his lighthearted style, he shares strategy to ambitious individuals looking to get the most returns for their creativity, giving advice on the challenges of technology, marketing, networking, monetization, and productivity. Having run his own digital agency, and consulted with startups and global firms, he offers a professional approach to personal pursuits.

And today, he is offering insight into how to get a job while you’re at SXSW this year. He has experience and offers all of the shortcuts so you can avoid wasting your time like everyone else does. The following is in his words:

I’ve written this article and put together resources so that you can navigate the harmonic chaos, with knowledge of ALL the events, escaping with a plethora of business contacts and lining up your next awesome gig. Keep reading to find a list with 2000 contacts of the biggest companies & names attending SXSW, and a list of events that representatives of these companies will be attending and speaking at.

Why network at SXSW? What makes SXSW such a good place for networking?

Although SXSW was originally founded to spread Austin’s music scene across the world, it quickly evolved, bringing in a massive influx of entrepreneurs, technologists, and businesses. In fact, for the first time in 2010, SXSW Interactive (the business/tech side of the festival) surpassed the attendance of the music festival, and with continued growth has made itself a tech and entrepreneurship hub.

This means that if you’re looking for a job, you have a set of unlimited businesses to pitch to, creatives to learn from, and new friends to make.

Last year, the majority of conference registrants were split equally between large businesses and startups/small businesses. The main reason for coming was to find new business opportunities (60%) of respondents. Although only 10% came specifically to hire talented people, I’ve experienced that a large number of companies are open to hiring through this medium, especially if you play your cards right.

Sarim at the YouTube Story HQ at SXSW Interactive. All photos, courtesy of @j3sus_h.

What do I need to do to get hired?

Contrary to the common belief, you don’t need one of those fancy badges to speak with decision makers. However, you will need to work on your image (both digital and physical) to make an impression on the people you meet. And you’ll most likely be waiting in line from time to time.

Where to find your match:

To figure out where your new employers are, you must know your own talent.

This is important because SXSW is fragmented into three main tracks (Interactive, Film, and Media) which are broken down further into their specific fields. Each of these fields has its own keynotes, speakers, sessions, and PARTIES.

The companies you want to work at will be present at their related events. Now you can both plan to meet a specific company ahead of time, but also be in a position to discover new companies that are similar in nature.

For instance, if I’m an aspiring movie director, I might plan to visit one of the various Film & TV Industry Sessions. After a long day of shaking hands and swapping names, you might retire to one of the Film Vision Screening Sections or one of the Art Installations.

Or if I’m a Virtual Reality developer, you know I’m attending the VR/AR/MR sessions and going to the Interactive Opening Party.

Every innovative company under the sun will be attending SXSW. To make things easier for you, I’ve painstakingly created a spreadsheet with the events held by the top companies (a lot of Big Four), their representative, and even their social profiles.

So onto what was promised, the huge list of business contacts & events at SXSW.

Notice: By using this list you agree that some information may be dated or incorrect and not to abuse the privilege of having this information by contacting them repeatedly or without good reason. Now that you’ve promised not to spam anyone and only reach out one time to the individuals where you are qualified to work, here is the full list.

Also, because I love you all – here’s a list of all the companies that will be at the trade show. There are about 300 companies, take your pick and make sure to look at the advice below to stand out from the crowd.

Lastly, here’s a list of events/sessions by field:

How to stand out!

You may have guessed that you’re not the only one looking for a job this SXSW season. Companies, especially at the trade show booths, may speak with a 100 excited candidates a day. How on earth will they remember you? No worries, with my tips – you’ll stay on their minds all the times.

1. Prepare your digital identity to showcase your talent & creations.

This is an obvious one – potential employers and other creatives you meet are going to want to see what you’ve built. That’s what the whole festival is about, creation. It’s time to deploy your side apps, to upload that pet film project, and publish that latest blog post. Make sure to tie it to a central location like a website or a resume, or even a profile. I know we’re only a day away (darn procrastination) but this truly is important if you want to stand out. Get this done tonight before you go to any parties.

2. Update your social profiles, make resumes.

SXSW has played a part in the origination and development of many types of social media (Twitter, Foursquare, Meerkat) because of their powerful concentrated effects within the community. Almost everyone you meet will have a Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter account. It’s actually a huge opportunity for anyone looking to create an audience.

Make sure your profile is up to date, with posts showing what you’re up to, and throw on some pictures of your beautiful self.

Make sure to exchange social information with everyone you meet, not at the outset, but after establishing an in-person connection.

3. Pre-meditated and impromptu research.

Now I’ll give you a secret from the tech.romantic playbook. An interaction is made meaningful between two people when there’s a connection. From a company’s perspective, that might mean having knowledge about their latest innovations, projects – etc. They came to SXSW for these conversations. It’s up to you to research what they’re interested in, and then bring it up in conversation.

Earlier, I gave you a list of all the companies at the trade show and job market. That’s a great place to start. But in actuality, you’ll be attending all these events and seeing companies from all over who’s attendance you couldn’t have predicted. This is where impromptu research comes in.

Stand off to the side and look these companies up – have something to talk about. Tie your own experiences and knowledge to what they’re working on. It’s really that simple.

Bonus SXSW tips, just for you.

So you’ve read this far. I’m impressed with your ability to pay attention, young jobhopper. I hope I’ve helped you in your quest to find new work. Here are some last minute bonuses and tips that you should keep in mind.

1. You’re at SXSW to have fun. So have fun.

I know the topic of this article was to find a job at SXSW, but if you’re intent on doing that in every interaction, you might miss out on the serendipity and vibrancy that the festival brings. Take time in your day to learn about others and experience the culture as it is. Sometimes that ends up being more meaningful than any paycheck.

2. You’re not going to meet everyone.

Even if you were the Flash zipping from exhibit to exhibit, you wouldn’t be able to go to all the sessions and meet all the companies. You should try and prioritize based on your interests, and attend events to learn something you’ve always wanted to learn. Don’t bother going to the events that might be hit or miss (subjective to what you like). Most people only attend for a weekend (the film part of the festival is busiest opening weekend), so target based on your goals and desires.

3. There are just as many affiliated events and opportunities.

There are a huge amount of SXSW parties going on during the festival. Don’t just get caught up attending the sessions (without a pass you’ll be waiting hours for popular ones). If you want a more intimate setting, you can scope out parties, oftentimes these will be sponsored by a big company. More than that – everyone representing the company should be there. Talk about access.

As a prize for reading this far, here’s an official Austin vendor list for the parties that will serve food and drink, with addresses and times.

The events also have a ridiculous amount of free food and drink, and everyone for the most part has let their guard down. Have some fun, you deserve it.

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!

Lani is the Chief Operating Officer at The American Genius and has been named in the Inman 100 Most Influential Real Estate Leaders several times, co-authored a book, co-founded BASHH and Austin Digital Jobs, and is a seasoned business writer and editorialist with a penchant for the irreverent.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business News

How to conduct a proper informational interview

(CAREER) Informational interviews comprise a technique in which you ask an employer or current employee to explain the details of their job to you. Try doing this before you transition into your next occupation!

Published

on

informational interview

At some point in your career, you may ask for someone’s time to do an informational interview — a process in which a job-seeker asks questions about a field, company, or position in hopes of receiving information which will inform both their decision to go into the field and their responses to the specific job’s actual interview. Since the power dynamic in an informational interview can be confusing, here are a few tips on how to conduct one. Not how to obtain one, but how to conduct one once both parties agree to connect.

The process of an informational interview typically starts with finding a person who works in your desired field (and/or location if you have a specific company in mind) and setting up a time during which you can ask them a few questions about things like their job responsibilities, salary, prerequisites, and so on. Once you’ve set up a time to meet in person (or via Skype or phone), you can proceed with putting together a list of questions.

Naturally, you should understand the circumstances under which asking for an informational interview is appropriate before requesting one. Your goal in an informational review should be to ask questions and listen to the answers, NOT pitch yourself as a potential hire. Ever. Nobody appreciates having their time wasted, and playing on your contact’s generosity as a way into their company is a sure way for your name to end up on their blacklist.

Once you’ve set up an informational interview, you should start the conversation by asking your contact what their typical day is like. This is doubly effective: your contact will most likely welcome the opportunity to discuss their daily goings-on, and you’ll be privy to an inside glance at their perspective on things like job responsibilities, daily activities, and other positive aspects of their position.

They’ll also probably detail some drawbacks to the position — things which usually aren’t explained in job postings — so you’ll have the opportunity to make a well-informed decision vis-à-vis the rigors of the job before diving head-first into the hiring process.

After your contact finishes walking you through their day, you can begin asking specific questions. However, unless they’ve been unusually brief in their description of their duties, your best course of action is probably to ask them follow-up questions about things they’ve already mentioned rather than asking targeted questions you wrote without context. This will both indicate that you were listening and allow them to expand upon information they’ve already explained, ensuring you’ll receive well-rounded responses.

You should save the most specific questions (e.g., the most easily answered ones) for the end of the interview. For example, if you want to know what a typical salary for someone in your contact’s position is or you’re wondering about vacation time, ask after you’ve wrapped up the bulk of the interview. This will prevent you from wasting the initial moments of the interview with technical content, and it may also keep the contact from assuming a strictly material motive on your part. And be willing to ask “what does someone with your job title typically earn in [city]?” instead of their specific take-home salary which might not be reflective of the norm (plus, it’s rude, and akin to asking someone their weight).

This is also a good time to ask for general advice regarding breaking into the field, though you may want to avoid this step if you feel like your contact isn’t comfortable discussing such a topic or if you’re intending to apply as someone with experience.

Of course, you won’t always be able to meet with your preferred contact directly, especially if they work in a dynamic field (e.g., emergency services) or have a security clearance which negates their ability to answer the bulk of your questions. If this happens, you have a couple of back-up options:

1. Send an email with a list of questions to the contact, or send them your phone number with a wide-open calling schedule. This is useful if your contact has a random or on-call schedule.

2. Ask your contact if there is someone else you could connect with (it could even be their assistant).

3. Speak to the company’s HR branch to see if you can request a company-specific job requirement print-out or link. These will usually be more particular than the industry requirements. But don’t ask for something you can find yourself on the company’s Careers page online.

Nothing beats an in-person interview over a cup of coffee, but — again — wasting someone’s time isn’t a good way to receive useful information about the position in which you’re interested.

Before transitioning to your next position or career field, consider conducting an informational interview. You’ll be amazed at the amount of insider information you can glean from simply listening to someone discuss their day in detail.

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!

Continue Reading

Business News

The sad truths you missed about the US Women’s Soccer Team lawsuit

(NEWS) The US Women’s Soccer team dominated headlines by suing for equal pay, but there was so much more to the lawsuit that could have a ripple effect in the business world.

Published

on

womens soccer lawsuit

Recently, on International Women’s Day, the United States Women’s Soccer Team (USWNT) filed a lawsuit against the US Soccer Federation. The timing of the suit is not only a sign of the team continuing their decades long fight against the organization (only three months before they are set to defend their World Cup title in France), but a recognition of the symbol that they have become in the larger battle that women and other minorities are waging in order to be given the same resources as the men leading in their fields.

It should go without saying that the women’s soccer team is unparalleled in its athletic success: over the past twenty years they have won three World Cup titles and four Olympic gold medals. These players, as ESPN acknowledges, are among the most accomplished and best known women athletes in the world.

Their counterpart, the Men’s National Soccer Team, leaves much to be desired (they failed to qualify for last year’s World Cup, for example) yet they consistently receive much more support from the US Soccer Federation.

Although the pay disparity between the USWNT and the male soccer team is certainly stark, the “gains” that the women athletes are fighting for go beyond monetary compensation.

According to Mashable, “This [suit] includes how women frequently play on a dangerous artificial surfaces when the men do not, fly commercial when the men travel by more convenient, comfortable charter flights, and the alleged allocation of fewer resources to promote women’s games compared to men’s.”

As if being the best players in your sport in the world and having to share hotel rooms after getting torn apart by the seams astroturf and receiving less-than-world-class medical care wouldn’t be infuriating enough, it’s truly this final point that highlights the glaring mistreatment of the USWNT.

Without support from the US Soccer Federation, not only in the form of payment but in promotion of their games and general good-will toward their players, the USWNT will not be able to grow their following so that they can establish a consistent revenue near what the men’s team attracts. This “lack” of revenue continues to create the chicken/egg excuse that the Federation has for not propping up the USWNT like they deserve.

It’s simply the opposite of “sportsmanship” for the US Soccer Federation to use these players’ love of playing the game (that, again, they are the best in the world at) and their country as a way to gaslight them into playing for less.

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!

Continue Reading

Business News

Think about automating tasks instead of replacing workers

(BUSINESS) Automation is great, unless you obsess over it and try to cut down on payroll – there’s a smarter approach that successful businesses take.

Published

on

automating tasks not people

The concept of automating your workflow is a tempting one — especially as payroll continues to be one of the evergreen highest costs of business. However, in contemplating how to streamline your workflow, you may do better to step back from the idea of “replacing workers” and instead think about you can optimize your existing employees by strategically tweaking their workflow.

As Ravin Jesuthasan and John Boudreau write in The Harvard Business Review, if the goal of automating is to ensure that your company is operating at its most cost effective and efficient levels, then chances are you’d still need knowledgeable employees to help you scale and capitalize.

Where automation can truly help your business is by transforming the ability of your organization to focus on the tasks that truly require a human touch or deep knowledge. For example, automation will not help your employees perform complex, interactive, or creative work like collaborating with clients to come up with solutions or designs.

However, it can help the process of brainstorming or co-designing these solutions easier by replacing some of the mechanical tasks that aid this high-level workflow.

For example, it may be helpful to automate basic research tasks for your designers. If your designers must create a client profile to help them launch their projects — basic information must surely exist at some other point in the process before this point. Maybe your firm has an intake form or contracts where a basic description of the goal of the contracted service has been created. By automating the sharing of that data between departments, perhaps in a content management system, you’d be able to free up time that the designers might spend on basic data collection so that they could instead use it for their more complex, empathetic work.

Jesuthasan and Boudreau offer up other advice for thinking about which specific tasks within your company’s workflow are the best candidates for automation.

Is a task simple? Routine? Does it require collaboration?

These kinds of inquiry are not only useful when thinking about your organizational processes, but they are good refreshers for thinking about the individual value and skills that your organization and its workers offer clients.

So instead of looking at how to cut down on payroll, consider automation as an option to improve the value you’re getting from your team, and freeing them from mind-numbing tasks that have nothing to do with their expertise. Win-win!

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!