Connect with us

Business News

A Googler’s manifesto heard ’round the world: 99% vitriol, 1% other

(BUSINESS NEWS) Over the weekend a 10 paged diatribe of anti-gender diversity found its way out of the internal memos of Google and into the hands of the public and people are having a field day.

Published

on

emplify google manifesto invests advocate bias millennials, beliefs, diversity, gender, bias, group, millennials

Gigantic yikes

A Google software engineer recently circulated an opinion piece on the nature of inclusion and diversity efforts within the company, and it’s causing quite a stir.

bar
The document itself sticks to a few core theses that the author finds problematic about the company’s focus on achieving equal representation in the workforce.

Digging a hole

First, the author opines that an attempt to reach a perfect 50/50 gender representation isn’t feasible, due to differences in population distribution and differences in “leadership” traits between men and women. That second part has a lot of folks riled up; the author states his beliefs as follows:

“On average, men and women biologically differ in many ways. These differences aren’t just socially constructed because:

  • They’re universal across human cultures
  • They often have clear biological causes and links to prenatal testosterone
  • Biological males that were castrated at birth and raised as females often still identify and act like males
  • The underlying traits are highly heritable
  • They’re exactly what we would predict from an evolutionary psychology perspective

Note, I’m not saying that all men differ from women in the following ways or that these differences are “just.” I’m simply stating that the distribution of preferences and abilities of men and women differ in part due to biological causes and that these differences may explain why we don’t see equal representation of women in tech and leadership.”

Aside from the offense taken to the thesis itself, critics take issue with its implication that a woman’s biological nature is inferior for leadership and for work in the tech sector.

Still digging

Second, the author states that systems in place at Google strive to achieve diversity for diversity’s sake, which makes it a moral issues instead of a cost/benefits decision. The author believes that the following company practices are evidence of this ideology:

“Programs, mentoring, and classes only for people with a certain gender or race

  • A high priority queue and special treatment for “diversity” candidates
  • Hiring practices which can effectively lower the bar for “diversity” candidates by decreasing the false negative rate
  • Reconsidering any set of people if it’s not “diverse” enough, but not showing that same scrutiny in the reverse direction (clear confirmation bias)
  • Setting org level OKRs for increased representation which can incentivize illegal discrimination”

No way out of this hole

Finally, the author believes that the culture around the diversity initiative creates a complex around protecting the victims. In such a culture, those who disagree become villanized, and contrarian opinions are silenced and shamed. As a result of this mindset, he believe, an honest dialogue of the issue cannot occur because it prioritizes feelings over facts.

Part of the discomfort around this manifesto stems from gender discrimination and harassment issues in Silicon Valley as a whole.

We’ve all seen what Uber is going through in regards to the latter. Google itself is reportedly facing an investigation regarding gender-based compensation discrimination. In that light, it’s easy to see this mindset as emblematic of the problem inside these companies.

Almost redeeming

The author himself wants to be clear that he believes that racism and sexism exist and should be confronted. However, he believes that a better solution is to “treat people as individuals, not as just another member of their group (tribalism).”

In that, he arguably makes his best point.

There are plenty of studies that conclude that blind tests of performance, aptitude and personality fit yield the best decisions because they eliminate inherent biases and assumptions.

At the same time, companies do need to examine how their values may overly incentivize individuals with a certain personality, aptitude or opinion, in order to avoid creating an echo chamber.

However, in focusing on questionable science around the nature of gender and the nature of opinion shaming, his argument becomes clouded and ineffective.

Tribalism not so far fetched

Google’s response seems to play into his thesis. Danielle Brown, Google’s new VP of Diversity, Integrity and Governance, released a statement saying that the opinion piece, “advanced incorrect assumptions about gender. I’m not going to link to it here as it’s not a viewpoint that I or this company endorses, promotes or encourages.”

She goes on to reiterate that diversity is a core value to Google and that they will continue to work towards that change. However, the tone hints at a tribalism that the author believes exists in the company.

#GoogleTribe

Born in Boston and raised in California, Connor arrived in Texas for college and was (lovingly) ensnared by southern hospitality and copious helpings of queso. As an SEO professional, he lives and breathes online marketing and its impact on businesses. His loves include disc-related sports, a pint of a top-notch craft beer, historical non-fiction novels, and Austin’s live music scene.

Business News

Calvin Klein skips stores, opts for Amazon – smart or suicide?

(BUSINESS NEWS) Calvin Klein takes a creative step that may increasingly become common, but is it still risky at this stage?

Published

on

calvin klein amazon retail

Calvin Klein has announced that it is taking a new approach this holiday season – instead of giving department stores access to its new stuff – online giant Amazon gets all that awesome underwear and denim first (here). Department stores won’t have access to their line until after Christmas sales have ended.

Wait, what?

It’s not a bad idea though. Basically, CK is following the money trail and with more and more consumers going to Amazon as the online shop of choice, compared to the thousands of stores closing across the country for the retail sector, it makes sense.

CK’s new approach is innovative- in addition to going online, it’s got two in-person pop-ups to create a new shopping experience that integrates Amazon Alexa devices and a highly personalized shopping experience. For example, you could literally see how those jeans pop in the club by having some delicious dance track play on Alexa and some clever lighting – dude! The pop up stores won’t even have prices, they just use the Amazon app to show relevant, changing prices (thanks to robots with algorithms).

How this new approach and unique shopping experience goes for this brand is going to set a new tone possibly – if it’s successful.

Amazon is set to benefit in its broader exposure and exclusivity (as though you needed a reason to shop at Amazon – I sure don’t!) of the relationship, but more importantly, as Amazon moves into fashion with things like “Prime Wardrobe” and seven new private-label clothes brand it’s set to become a great place for clothing. Earlier this year, Nike began selling on Amazon as well, so while CK isn’t the first to jump on it, it’s certainly doing it in a unique way.

Sadly, the pop-ups are only in the bougie locales of New York and Los Angeles, but everyone else should check out the customer site for all those good denim jackets, I mean, jeans. In terms of marketing, Model Karlie Kloss and YouTuber Lilly Singh are influencing the campaign, creating a one of a kind mix of fashion, technology, and engagement.

The great CK experiment is proving to be a fascinating show – and has some big implications for future retail.

Continue Reading

Business News

Working through job interview adrenaline and anxiety

(CAREER NEWS) Find out how to use the pressure and adrenaline of a face-to-face job interview to your advantage.

Published

on

introverts job interview

It’s undeniable that there is a certain amount of adrenaline that flows through you during a face-to-face job interview. You’re theoretically vying for a job you really want (or need), so you have to make sure that you put in your best effort.

Even under the best of circumstances, this can make you feel like you’re in an interrogation room being asked what you were doing the night of December 2nd, 1997. This is where that adrenaline can come into play, which can make things harder – just make sure you’re properly utilizing it.

First off, use that adrenaline to get you to the interview location with plenty of time to spare. No employer values tardiness, and it’s good to walk into a high-pressure situation with all of your ducks in a row.

Being early also gives you a chance to get a feel for the environment and gives you a chance to make an impression with the receptionist. Speaking as a former receptionist, this is not something you should overlook as our opinions are often asked by the employer.

Once you’re in the interview setting, use the adrenaline to keep you engaged in the conversation. An important aspect of this is making eye contact.

Don’t confuse this with being creepy and staring without blinking. Just be sure to look into the eye of the person you’re speaking to, and be sure to share that eye contact with others if you’re speaking to a panel of interviewers, keeping a happy, interested (but not scared or overly enthusiastic) look on your face.

With rushing adrenaline, you may use self-soothing movements like playing with your hair or wringing your hands. You may exhibit anxious movements like toe tapping. Don’t do any of these things – they’re within your control. But if something like a shaky voice from these nerves are not within your control, apologize up front (“Apologies for my shaky voice, I have normal interview jitters, I usually speak like a normal human person”) and move on.

Depending on how the interviewer leads the conversation, the entire interview doesn’t have to be this stiff discussion. If given the opportunity, use this time to work in some small talk so they can see the personable side of your personality. For example, you can keep it related to the situation by making small talk about the traffic and asking how the interviewer typically gets to work each day (buying time is another great way to work through the anxiety of rushing adrenaline).

Throughout the course of the conversation, whether the small talk or the interview itself, make sure you’re showing your true colors and not lying. It isn’t hard (especially these days) to be caught in a lie, so don’t waste anyone’s time with the nonsense.

Once everything is said and done, say your thank yous and your goodbyes and make your way to the exit. Don’t try and overstay your welcome or linger in the lobby, just be on your way. But, don’t forget to send a courteous “thank you” email.

Above all, remember that everyone is nervous in a job interview situation – you’re not alone!

Continue Reading

Business News

If Amazon puts HQ in Chicago, they’ll get a cut of their workers’ income taxes

(BUSINESS NEWS) Amazon continues the hunt for a new city to set up shop, and cities across the nation are offering plenty to attract the brand.

Published

on

cash amazon label

If Amazon sets up a new headquarters in Chicago, the company could get over two billion dollars in tax breaks, including $1.32 billion from their workers’ income taxes. How would they achieve this fiendish feat?

With the magic of personal income tax diversion, where employers withhold state income taxes from employee paychecks. Workers still pay full income taxes, but the company holds onto all or part of the funds.

This happens when a city says to a business, “please come live here, we want your money so much you can just not pay taxes okay?” In this case, both Chicago and the state authorities of Illinois presented this offering to Amazon.

In September, Amazon announced plans for a second headquarters, which was very originally dubbed Amazon HQ2. The new headquarters is intended to supplement the existing one in Seattle. Amazon intends to spend around five billion on new construction alone, and said it plans on having 50,000 workers at HQ2.

Amazon outlined core requirements for HQ2, including access to mass transit, metropolitan population of over one million, and up to eight million square feet of office space just in case they need to expand even more. Proximity to major universities and airports with direct flights to New York, San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington D.C. were part of the optional rider.

At least 238 other bids have been made for the headquarters. Chris Christie proposed paying Amazon up to $10,000 for every job created even though New Jersey has $60 billion in unfunded pension obligations.

Plenty of other cities want to take Amazon to prom too, and have launched promotional campaigns to stand out from the crowd. One Arizona economic development firm sent a 21-foot cactus, which was rejected due to Amazon’s corporate gift policy. Don’t worry about the cactus’ feelings though, it was donated to the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

In another proposal, Kansas City, Missouri mayor Sly James purchased one thousand Amazon products, donated them to charity, then wrote five star reviews for every item, which all included shout outs to Kansas City’s positive attributes. James either has way too much time on his hands, or employs very productive interns.

This lovely display of cities offering incredible legal loopholes for Amazon is pretty heartwarming. After all, the company is definitely in need of financial help and government perks. Except that oh wait, founder Jeff Bezos is currently the only person in the world worth over $100 billion dollars.

Amazon’s soaring share price added around $43 billion to founder Jeff Bezos’ personal fortune this year, and Black Friday alone raked in $2.4 billion. There’s also all that fun stuff about subpar
workers’ conditions in Amazon’s warehouses that we all pretend to forget when there’s free two-day shipping on that thing you really, really want.

So far, Amazon has yet to accept Chicago’s tax-tastic bid, or any other offer. Based on the list of requirements, Moody’s Analytics released a data-specific analysis of the top cities.

Austin, Texas topped the list, followed by Atlanta, Philadelphia, and Rochester, New York. Other contenders include Pittsburgh, Portland, and New York City.

Amazon will announce the final site selection and plan sometime in 2018.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

The
American Genius
News neatly in your inbox

Join thousands of AG fans and SUBSCRIBE to get business and tech news updates, breaking stories, and MORE!

Emerging Stories