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How and why Walmart is thriving right now

[BUSINESS NEWS] Once again, Walmart shows their might as a one-stop shopping giant, even during the pandemic.

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girl looking at walmart home screen on laptop

Love it or hate it, Walmart is a formidable player in the U.S. retail sales game, and during the pandemic, their sales have continued to grow. Here’s how they did it and what other retailers can learn during the dark days of COVID-19 and beyond.

Walmart has always had the knack to appeal to a broad buyer base, with a seemingly bottomless well of inventory and bargain prices. Cheap and plentiful goods are part of the formula, along with options for ecommerce. In 2020, online shopping is where it’s at, due to safety concerns. Walmart has seen a massive increase in online sales–a 97% increase, in fact.

Staying home was a recommendation, then a mandate, and is now a recommendation once more. Infectious disease experts, doctors, and scientists agree that less interaction with people and fewer outings, coupled with vigilant mask-wearing in public and hand washing, will help keep us safe and prevent or slow the spread of COVID-19. For people of a certain age and/or with compromised immune systems whose risk of a COVID-19 case being fatal, it’s imperative.

People began to make fewer trips to fewer places in order to stay safe. Thus the rise in online shopping makes sense. Because they already had an online shopping system set up, Walmart easily transitioned to providing more online sales, where customers could choose to pickup their orders or have them delivered.

Being a modern day trading post of sorts, a one-stop shopping spot, also helped bolster Walmart’s sales during COVID-19. Why risk going to three or four different stores when Walmart has groceries, cooking and gardening supplies, games, electronics, jigsaw puzzles, plus bath and beauty goods? Not to mention the extra time it takes to disinfect all the packages when you get home; it makes more sense for most people to only stop at one place. This time saved by going to one store (in this case, Walmart) instead of driving around can also help save your sanity.

Affordability, availability, and familiarity are key pillars of the Walmart formula for success. Easy is the magic word. Cheap is another word with extra appeal to the millions of people in the U.S. who’ve lost their full or part time jobs or have seen their hours/clients reduced since the shutdowns began in March. Stretching a dollar is the in-demand skill we all need to cultivate now, and shopping at inexpensive stores like Walmart is one way to do this.

For these reasons, Walmart’s second quarter sales surged as people began receiving their stimulus checks. Now, as most people have already received and spent their stimulus money, Walmart’s sales are slightly falling off again, though they are still strong. Their business model is working for consumers who need convenience and affordability.

Another factor in Walmart’s 2020 success is their massive inventory of in-demand items. I’m not even talking about the water and TP hoarders. As Americans stayed home longer, people sought ways to entertain themselves, set up remote workplaces for the adults and study areas for children and college students. People needed to exercise and cook more. Even jigsaw puzzles were nearly impossible to find online or in stores by the time early May rolled around.

Walmart’s sales of electronics boomed during this period: TVs and computer sales skyrocketed early on. As quarantine remained the order of the day, more people cooked at home more often, and cooking supplies also kept moving off the Walmart shelves and out of the warehouses. Many started working on their yards and gardens, and Walmart once again was there to accommodate.

Cooking and yard items still remain popular as people are realizing that they will be continuing to spend more time at home. People brightened their days and fought off boredom and the heat with inflatable pools for them, their kids, and their pets, or maybe bought bread pans, a pressure cooker, or lawn chairs.

Like many massive corporations, Walmart has had its share of scrutiny. They have been a problematic presence for a long time. However, they have always been able to reach their audience with low prices and a wide range of available items. These same factors have helped push their sales during 2020, and will likely continue to do so, especially if the government decides on issuing a second stimulus check to aid U.S. workers.

 

Joleen Jernigan is an ever-curious writer, grammar nerd, and social media strategist with a background in training, education, and educational publishing. A native Texan, Joleen has traveled extensively, worked in six countries, and holds an MA in Teaching English as a Second Language. She lives in Austin and constantly seeks out the best the city has to offer.

Business News

Startup seeks to streamline your software shopping search

(BUSINESS) This startup with a waitlist wants to help you shop for software without having to tear your hair out, become an expert, or hire a consultant.

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software shopping with testbox

Software shopping is, undoubtedly, one of the most crucial aspects of any successful business: Choose correctly, and you’ll find yourself seamlessly moving through daily operations, while a poor choice often results in a lack of efficiency. Unfortunately, the shopping aspect is anything but efficient, with demos and sales meetings lasting for unnecessarily long periods of time. That’s where TestBox comes into play.

TestBox is a tool born out of frustrated necessity. According to creator Sam Senior, “The inspiration for TestBox came from repeatedly hearing just how incredibly frustrating the software buying experience is…I heard similar stories where buyers felt that the process was all on the sales team’s terms, often taking many months, and without all the information and access they needed to be truly confident in their decision.”

It’s a tale as old as time: Sales teams effectively hold your time hostage, planning meetings and tech demos in controlled environments; you, in turn, receive a partial truth regarding the product you’re considering, and at the end of the process, you feel pressured into purchasing the product–if for no other reason than you’ve already dedicated a full workweek (or, heaven forbid, month) to it.

TestBox offers a simple, elegant solution to this problem: the ability to compare multiple tools that have been selected for your needs. One need only specify their software requirements in the TestBox menu to receive a list of software that fits those requirements, complete with “guided walkthroughs for each software and use case.”

There’s also a side-by-side comparison feature for different software types, allowing you to make a truly informed decision using your data and interfaces rather than relying on a scripted demo.

Finally, TestBox provides graphics to show pros and cons from an efficiency standpoint for each tool you test; once you make a decision, TestBox connects you with the software provider to complete your purchase.

It should be noted that TestBox is free to use. According to their website, their revenue comes via commission for facilitating a software purchase, and since that commission is fairly uniform rather than varying per tool, TestBox assures you that their presentation of each option is not swayed in the process.

TestBox also partners with ZenDesk, HubSpot, and FreshDesk, so make of that what you will.

Currently, TestBox has a waitlist for use. They plan on adding a variety of CRM and Customer Success options to their client list soon.

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Business News

Asking the wrong questions can ruin your job opportunity

(BUSINESS NEWS) An HR expert discusses the best (and worst) questions she’s experienced during candidate interviews. it’s best to learn from others mistakes.

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interview candidates answers

When talking to hiring managers outside of an interview setting, I always find myself asking about their horror stories as they’re usually good for a laugh (and a crash course in what not to do in an interview). A good friend of mine has worked in HR for the last decade and has sat in on her fair share of interviews, so naturally I asked her what some of her most notable experiences were with candidates – the good and the bad, in her own words…

“Let’s see, I think the worst questions I’ve ever had are typically related to benefits or vacation as it demonstrates that their priorities are not focused on the actual job they will be performing. I’ve had candidates ask how much vacation time they’ll receive during an initial phone screen (as their only question!). I’ve also had them ask about benefits and make comparisons to me over the phone about how our benefits compare to their current employer.

I once had a candidate ask me about the age demographics of our office, which was very uncomfortable and inappropriate! They were trying to determine if the attorneys at our law firm were older than the ones they were currently supporting. It was quite strange!

I also once had a candidate ask me about the work environment, which was fine, but they then launched into a story about how they are in a terrible environment and are planning on suing their company. While I understand that candidates may have faced challenges in their previous roles or worked for companies that had toxic working environments, it is important that you do not disparage them.

In all honesty, the worst is when they do not have any questions at all. In my opinion, it shows that they are not really invested in the position or have not put enough thought into their decision to change jobs. Moving to a new company is not a decision that should be made lightly and it’s important for me as an employer to make sure I am hiring employees who are genuinely interesting in the work they will be doing.

The best questions that I’ve been asked typically demonstrate that they’re interested in the position and have a strong understanding of the work they would be doing if they were hired. My personal favorite question that I’ve been asked is if there are any hesitations or concerns that I may have based on the information they’ve provided that they can address on the spot. To me, this demonstrates that they care about the impression that they’ve made. I’ve asked this question in interviews and been able to clarify information that I did not properly explain when answering a question. It was really important to me that I was able to correct the misinformation as it may have stopped me from moving forward in the process!

Also, questions that demonstrate their knowledge base about the role in which they’re applying for is always a good sign. I particularly like when candidates reference items that I’ve touched on and weave them into a question.

A few other good questions:
• Asking about what it takes to succeed in the position
• Asking about what areas or issues may need to be addressed when first joining the company
• Asking about challenges that may be faced if you were to be hired
• Asking the employer what they enjoy most about the company
• I am also self-centered, so I always like when candidates ask about my background and how my current company compares to previous employers that I’ve worked for. Bonus points if they’ve actually looked me up on LinkedIn and reference specifics :)”

Think about the best and worst experiences you’ve had during an interview – and talk to others about the same topic – and see how that can help you with future interviews.

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Business News

How to stop reeking of desperation when you job hunt

(CAREER) Hunting for a job can come with infinite pressures and rejection, sometimes you just want it to be over – here’s how to avoid reeking of desperation.

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desperation when job hunting

Whether you were one of the millions of people who quit their job this year in The Great Resignation or you’ve been unemployed since the pandemic began, when you’re looking for work, it can feel hopeless after a while. Just like that student in class who raises their hand at every question, you don’t want to come across as desperate, “pick me, pick me!” Money might be tight. You want to be eager, but you don’t want to be so anxious that you sabotage your job search.

Right now, job seekers have the upper hand, but you want to show off your skills and professionalism, not your neediness.

5 ways you come across as overly desperate for a job:

  1. Applying for multiple positions at the same company. Employers want you to be a fit for a particular job. Instead, tell the hiring manager that you’re open to other positions that might be a good fit.
  2. Checking in with the hiring manager too much. Follow up after an interview, but don’t keep checking in. If they have news, they’ll share it.
  3. Talking about how much you need a job. Don’t bring up your personal issues in an interview. Stay focused on why you are the best person for the job.
  4. Being willing to accept any offer. You should negotiate and go to bat for yourself when you get an offer. Explain why you’re worth more money because you probably are.
  5. Forgetting to ask questions about the bigger picture. You don’t want to be so eager to impress that you don’t think about the company culture and perks. You might be desperate, but getting into a job that doesn’t fit your needs and personality won’t help your situation.

Desperation can make you appear to be in the clearance bin at the store. Sure, you may get something for a great price, but will you actually be able to fully use it when you get it home? As a job seeker, you want to be the premium brand on the shelf. Maybe not every buyer (employer) can appreciate you or even afford you, but when the right one comes along, it’s a good fit.

Employers want team members who will be assets for their company. Your job search needs to start with a strong resume and impressive cover letter. Instead of going for quantity, choose job openings for quality, where you can bring something to the table for the company.

Ask a Manager’s Alison Green has some great resources for getting a job, including a free guide to preparing for interviews. Practice interviewing. Make a great first impression. Know that there is a job out there for you.

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