Connect with us

Business News

Which state leads crowdfunding efforts? Texas, duh

Texas crowdfunding efforts have generated $1.8 million in investments over the course of about a year and a half.

Published

on

Leading the pack

Back in February of this year, John Morgan, the Texas State Securities Board Commissioner, predicted that Texas would become a national leader in US crowd-funding investment. New crowd-funding regulations, explained Morgan, would allow Texas-based companies to generate up to $1 million per year.

bar
We’re also warned to be “careful what we wish for”, but in this case it’s a good thing: Fast-forward to May 2016 and a recent article in the online journal Austininno seems to bear out that “Texas crowd funding efforts have generated $1.8 million in investments over the course of about a year and a half, and all that activity makes the state a national leader for this new type of funding businesses and projects.”

Commented Morgan, “We believe equity crowd-funding will catalyze new and wider prosperity, entrepreneurship and job growth in Texas.”

Do the math: With a population of more than 26 million, Texas is a massive market for companies wishing to raise capital through crowd-funding, [which serves] as a great gateway for all Texans to participate in funding growth in their communities and the state at large.

Playing by the rules

The key to Texas’ success is that intrastate crowd-funding allows non-accredited investors to invest up to $5,000 a year into one or more businesses and potentially get equity-based returns or interest from their investments. Businesses can generate up to $1 million from the crowd.

So far, 35 such offerings have been made in Texas, including six from Austin. In Austin, those include a group living development for tech workers, a kava bar, three tech startups working with Diversity Fund, and a restaurant.

Slow but sure

Despite all the activity, questions remain about how successful the efforts will be for both the businesses and their investors: Only 14 of the 35 fundraising efforts have reached their minimum investment marks. Only about 16 percent (roughly $1.8 million) of the $10.8 million that Texas businesses hope to collectively raise has been secured.

The website Altfi explains that Equity crowdfunding legislation in the US has been slow to develop. The industry as a whole is waiting for Title III of the JOBS Act, which will open up the industry to non-accredited investors.

When this act is passed it should release a huge amount of capital to small and medium sized businesses and provide a boost to the US economy.

A successful model

The most financially successful crowd-funding effort in Texas, so far, is the Chapman & Kirby gastrolounge that is planned as an event space and restaurant in downtown Houston. It has raised $440,800 from 134 investors. It seems to be a growth model that has worked: The offering is open to accredited investors, too, which means it may have generated investments of more than $5,000 from wealthier individuals.

#YeehawFunding

Nearly three decades living and working all over the world as a radio and television broadcast journalist in the United States Air Force, Staff Writer, Gary Picariello is now retired from the military and is focused on his writing career.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. L.W. Dusty Brogdon

    May 31, 2016 at 2:09 pm

    See details here
    https://www.texasintrastatecrowdfunding.com/Texas-Results.html

    The truth is Texas Intrastate System is FAR behind where it should (Could) be!
    Of the 10 registered Texas Crowdfunding Portals (TCPs) with approved applications with our Texas State Securities Board (TSSB) , one has failed to fund ANY of the portals 7 Offers (Trucrowd(
    … One, Crudefunders has $1,050,000.00 of the $1.8 M total.
    Note;
    Equityeats has no offers and has never … CROWDBOARDERS has one offer and is in violation of The Texas Escrow Agent Rule …
    EquityBrick is new , Texas Crowdfunding has Zero offers and Zero funded.
    Business Funding is a No Show …

    DIYVERSIFY, LLC, New not active currently.

    BUSINESS FUNDING LLC
    2100 WYCHWOOD DRIVE
    AUSTIN TX 78746

    CROWDBOARDERS LLC
    4100 MIDWAY ROAD SUITE 2120
    CARROLLTON TX 75007

    CRUDEFUNDERS PORTAL TEXAS, LLC
    4550 POST OAK PLACE DRIVE SUITE 119
    HOUSTON TX 77027

    DIVERSITY FUND, LLC
    1108 LAVACA STREET # 110-309
    AUSTIN TX 78701

    DIYVERSIFY, LLC
    1127 ELDRIDGE PARKWAY SUITE 300 – 339
    HOUSTON TX 77077

    EQUITY BRICK LLC
    7703 NORTH LAMAR BLVD SUITE 510G
    AUSTIN TX 78752

    HIVE EQUITY INC. dba MASSVENTURE
    110 E. HOUSTON STREET 7TH FLOOR
    SAN ANTONIO TX 78205

    NEXTSEED TX LLC
    4101 GREENBRIAR DRIVE SUITE 122K
    HOUSTON TX 77098

    TEXAS CROWDFUNDING LLC
    20214 LAKE SHERWOOD DRIVE
    KATY TX 77450

    TRUCROWD TEXAS, INC
    10333 HARWIN DRIVE SUITE 460G
    HOUSTON TX 77036

  2. Pingback: Austin vs. Silicon Valley: Why is only one of the two terrified of the tech downturn? - The American Genius

  3. Pingback: Crowdfunding's first report card - good enough for the fridge? - The American Genius

  4. Pingback: Are Intrastate Crowdfunding Laws Still Relevant?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business News

Plastic bags are making a comeback, thanks to COVID-19

(BUSINESS NEWS) Plastic bags are back, whether you like it or not – at least for now.

Published

on

Plastic bags

Single use plastic bags are rising like a phoenix from the ashes of illegality all over the country, from California to New York. Reusable bags are falling out of favor in an effort to curtail the spread of COVID-19. It’s a logical step: the less something is handled, generally, the safer it is going to be. And porous paper bags are thought to have a higher potential to spread the virus through contact.

It’s worth mentioning that single use plastic bags are considerably more
environmentally efficient to manufacture compared to paper, cloth, and reusable plastic bags. Per unit, they require very little material to make and are easily mass produced. It also goes without saying that they have a very short lifespan, after which they end up sitting in landfills, littering streets, or drifting through oceans.

In the grand scheme of things, it’s hard to deny that single use plastics have the potential to be as dangerous to humans as COVID-19. Coronavirus is a very immediate existential threat to us in the United States, but the scale of the global crises that stem from the irresponsible consumption of cheap disposable goods, also cannot be overstated. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch isn’t going anywhere. (And did you know that it’s just one of many huge garbage patches around the world?)

So… what exactly are we going to do about the comeback of plastic bags? Because to be honest, I used to work in grocery retail, and it is difficult and often unrewarding. So, I wouldn’t exactly love handling potentially contaminated tote bags all day in the midst of a pandemic if I were still a supermarket employee. You couldn’t pay me enough to feel comfortable with that – forget minimum wage!

I used to have a plastic bag stuffed full of other plastic bags sitting in my kitchen, like American nesting dolls, before disposable plastics fell from grace. (I’m sure some of y’all know exactly what I’m talking about.) This bag of bags was never a point of pride. It got really annoying because it just kept growing. There are only so many practical home uses for the standard throw-away plastic shopping bag. Very small trash can liners; holding snarls of unused cables, another thing I accumulate for no reason; extremely low-budget packing material; one could get crafty and somehow weave them into a horrible sweater, I guess.

I don’t miss my bag of bags. I don’t want to have to deal with another. Hey, Silicon Valley? Got any disruptive ideas for this one?

Even if we concede that disposable plastics are a necessary evil in the fight against COVID-19, the fact remains that they stick around long after you’re done with them. That’s true whether you throw them out or not.

I’m not trying to direct blame anywhere. Of course businesses should do their best to keep their customers and staff safe, and if that means using plastic bags, so be it. Without clear guidance from our federal government, every part of society has been fumbling and figuring out how to keep one another healthy with the tools they’ve got at hand. (…Well, almost every part.)

The changes to the state bag bans have been cautious and temporary so far, which is a small relief. But nobody really knows how much longer the pandemic will rage on and necessitate the relaxations.

I won’t pretend that I have a sure solution. All I can really ask is that we all be extra mindful of our usage of these disposable plastic products. Let’s think creatively about what we might otherwise throw away. We must not trade one apocalypse for another.

Continue Reading

Business News

Scammers are taking advantage of the unemployed

(BUSINESS NEWS) In a country that’s been stricken by higher-than-ever levels of unemployment, scammers have found a unique way to target this vulnerable demographic.

Published

on

With unemployment rates reaching unprecedented levels in recent months, it’s a fairly safe bet to say that there’s something that many of us currently have in common: we need a job. While these levels are slowly starting to decline, already down to 11.1 percent in June from an all-time high of 14.7 percent in April, the need for steady gainful employment is still great for many Americans. That’s what makes the newest scam making its rounds particularly vile.

There’s a common misconception that people who get scammed largely deserved their misfortune. Whether it’s presumed that they got greedy, they fell for something that was too good to be true, or they were looking for an easy way out, it’s both unfair and unkind to make these snap judgements of victims of scammers. When it comes to scammers, there’s only one party to blame for these wrongful actions — the scammers themselves.

And with literally millions of people looking for a job right now, these scammers have found a new round of susceptible people to target. It’s a fairly well documented fact that scammers have a knack for knowing who will be easy prey, and this latest scam is no different. According to a report from the Better Business Bureau (BBB), scammers have ramped up their efforts to separate desperate job seekers from what’s left of their meager funds.

This scam is nothing new, but it has surged in popularity with the sheer number of people looking for jobs in today’s economy. Dubbed the “employment scam,” it can take on many forms, but the end result remains the same. At the end of the day, if a person is bilked out of their money, then the scammer has won.

What does this scam look like, and how can you safeguard yourself from falling prey to it? Please note that anyone — from all walks of life, no matter your age, your sex, your race, or any other factor — can become a victim of a scam. The only way to protect yourself is to be aware of the scam and recognize the signs of it. If a potential employer asks any of the following of you, then there’s a good chance they’re a scammer:

  • You are required to pay the so-called employer for your own training up front.
  • You are expected to give up your banking/personal info for a credit check.
  • You are overpaid by a fraudulent check and told to wire back the difference.
  • You are told that you need to pay for expensive equipment to work from home.

Please note that these scammers can spoof legitimate companies. They may try to pass themselves off as real-deal businesses; they’ve even tried to emulate the BBB itself. And when you refuse to follow through with their demands, they will double down and might even become hostile and aggressive, resorting to threats and cajoling. It’s important to not cave in; once they start bullying you, they know the gig is up.

The BBB also notes that coronavirus has created a “perfect storm” for scammers, but there are a few things you can do to protect yourself. They advise that you avoid social isolation, as that can make you more vulnerable to scammers. When in doubt, seek out a friend’s feedback. Sometimes a reality check can make all the difference in whether or not you become a mark. Do a little bit of digging online before you accept an “offer” or share personal information. And finally, be prudent. No matter how many warnings the BBB puts out each year about scams, the only person who can really protect you from getting scammed is just one person…yourself.

Continue Reading

Business News

American Express’ cash back program helps members support small businesses

(BUSINESS NEWS) Between now and September 20th, AMEX is providing $50 in credits to their cardholders to support local businesses.

Published

on

cashback program

It’s no secret that coronavirus has been nothing short of devastating for small businesses. Even with the Small Business Administration (SBA) offering financial relief in the form of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL), many small businesses are still struggling to keep their doors open. So far, the numbers have been astronomical — to the tune of some 100,000 small businesses closing down permanently, according to a report from the National Bureau of Economic Research — and they’re expected to continue to rise as the pandemic drags on.

With that in mind, American Express has come forward with their own disaster relief program of sorts. Between now and the 20th of September, the credit card company will be offering a cash back rewards incentive for their cardholders. The program is fairly simple and straightforward: for every $10 (or more) that you spend at a small business, Amex will give you a $5 statement credit on your account. This can be repeated up to ten times, for a total of $50 in rewards. Not bad, huh? But the question remains: what’s a mere $50 in the grand scheme of things, and will it actually help out small businesses in the long run?

Well, first and foremost, $50 is no small chunk of change. For most of us, it’s a fairly decent perk, especially since it requires us to do what we would have done anyway (shop at local businesses). Whether you feel like getting takeout from your local mom-and-pop restaurant, you’re going to pick up a few groceries for dinner tonight at your corner market, or you need to take Fido in for a checkup at your neighborhood veterinary clinic, these activities all count toward the reward program. You’re literally getting paid for shopping locally. Easy peasy.

And secondly, historic data does prove that these incentives do work. Amex rolled out their first small business reward program back in 2010, called Small Business Saturday®, as a response to the mass consumerism of Black Friday. In 2015, the SBA decided to get in on the fun and joined forces with Amex, sponsoring the program. Even better, a study from 2019 revealed that a whopping $19.6 billion was funneled back into local economies thanks to the initiative. So while “just” $50 may not seem like much, it adds up to impressive numbers when seen from a more macroscopic perspective.

This isn’t the only program that has Amex’s name standing behind it, either. The company is also the driving force behind the Stand for Small program, which unifies larger businesses who are offering their own helping hand to smaller businesses. Whether you’re looking for assistance in managing your expenses, or you’re in need of help in growing your online presence, the Stand for Small program was designed to help make this possible. Large names like Amazon and eBay are included in the ranks that have rallied behind Stand for Small, lending clout to this program.

So what’s a little extra $50? Is it worth it to you? Sure, the intentions of some of these companies may be somewhat less than magnanimous — there’s no arguing that there’s something in it for them, as well — it doesn’t change the fact that in an economy that’s been crippled by COVID-19, they’re actually doing something instead of just sitting there idly and waiting for someone else to take action.

That, at least, has to be worth something. And if you’re wanting to get your hands on a share of the cool fifty bucks courtesy of Amex, they’d like to remind you that you do need to enroll in the rewards program no later than July 26. If you don’t, you may miss out on your opportunity to help keep small businesses afloat (while also enjoying an extra $5 in your pocket here or there), courtesy of American Express.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!