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Move, NAR sue Zillow and Errol Samuelson and it won’t be the last lawsuit

(Business News) Move, Inc. and the National Association of Realtors have filed suit, alleging that Errol Samuelson breached his contract, misappropriated trade secrets, and left Move with no warning, destroying evidence on his way out.

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Move, NAR sue Zillow and Errol Samuelson

According to court documents filed in the State of Washington, a lawsuit has been filed by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) and Move, Inc. (operator of realtor.com, Top Producer, SocialBios, ListHub, and several other companies) against Zillow, Inc. and Errol Samuelson.

The suit alleges breach of contract, breach of fiduciary duty, and misappropriation of trade secrets. In a statement, Steve Berkowitz, CEO of Move said, “we take our trade secrets and intellectual property extremely seriously as a valuable asset in our competitive position in the marketplace. We take action in cases in which we believe our trade secrets have been compromised. We have raised this matter for the courts and believe that the matter will be resolved judiciously.”

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When Errol Samuelson, former president of realtor.com and Chief Strategy Officer at Move, Inc. left to become Zillow’s Chief Industry Development Officer, reactions ranged from criticism of Move, calling it a poaching of talent, to a criticism of Samuelson, calling it a betrayal to the industry as NAR members own and have an operating agreement with Move (which competes with Zillow).

Lawsuit alleges Samuelson destroyed evidence

Court documents state that “Each quarter that he was employed by, and an officer of, Move, Mr. Samuelson certified in writing that he had read, understood, and would abide by Move’s Code of Conduct and Business Ethics,” which includes a “Conflict of Interest” clause and forbids employees from releasing proprietary and confidential information during and after his employment.

Further, the suit states that Samuelson arranged to defect to Zillow, destroyed evidence by erasing all memory from the iPhone, iPad, and laptop issued to him for business purposes by Move, and then resigning from Move without notice.

Last week, we also questioned the timing, wondering if it was designed to hurt Move, Inc. company stocks, or benefit Zillow in some capacity, which Move and NAR clearly agree with via their lawsuit.

The truth is that during his tenure at Move, Samuelson was promoted to a position that was so encompassing, that his job entailed knowing the inner workings of Move companies as well as the National Association of Realtors. The role will not be filled as it once was, rather remain broken into parts and functions will be filled by various people.

Samuelson isn’t the only one

Don’t consider this the last lawsuit to be filed, as Zillow announced today that Samuelson’s replacement, Curt Beardsley jumped ship today as well to become Zillow’s Vice President of Industry Development.

Also, this probably shouldn’t be considered the last high ranking official that will leave for Zillow in this apparent coup – their pockets are deep and they’re clearly willing to use their assets. Next quarter’s SEC filings will shed more light on just that.

Lani is the Chief Operating Officer at The American Genius - she has co-authored a book, co-founded BASHH and Austin Digital Jobs, and is a seasoned business writer and editorialist with a penchant for the irreverent.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Don Reedy

    March 17, 2014 at 9:15 pm

    Told you so. We gave (gave in) to Zillow…and now they’re taking. I need a single malt with @jeff brown.

  2. Pamela Peterson

    March 22, 2014 at 8:36 am

    I’ve found half of the information found on Zillow is false or incomplete. They then turn around and sell it to Realtors to capture leads in the local market they know nothing about. Zilliows zestimates are wrong, misleading consumers about the value of their home or the home they are previewing. If you need a realtor get a referral from and friend or family member with a life experience with that realtor. Someone that goes on Zillow and pays a thousand dollars a month for your lead, doesn’t have a working knowledge of the realtor their getting. Realtors are not all created equally. Real estate is local in nature so if you need one just ask a friend, family member or a co-worker. They will probably share with you their life experience with that realtor which is the real truth, good and bad. #napervillebrkr. Pamela Peterson – RE/MAX Action – Lisle, IL.

  3. JoeLoomer

    March 26, 2014 at 2:30 pm

    Would love to see an AG post with data on how off Zestimates are in major metropolitan areas.

    Navy Chief, Navy Pride

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Business News

Office Depot still open to buyers – just not you, Staples

(BUSINESS NEWS) This isn’t the first time the office giants have tried to combine, but Office Depot has some particular conditions if Staples wants to acquire them.

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Balding man in glasses at a whiteboard, using supplies from Office Depot.

In Staples’ third attempt to take over Office Depot, its acquisition offer was rejected by the ODP Corporation, Office Depot’s parent company. On January 11, Staples sent a letter to Office Depot’s board of directors offering to buy “100% of the issued and outstanding common stock” from its office-supply rival. At $40 per share, the deal to acquire Office Depot is over $2 billion.

“Staples believes that its all-cash transaction is a compelling value proposition for ODP’s stockholders that offers a high degree of certainty and is superior to the intrinsic, standalone value of ODP,” wrote Stefan Kaluzny, on behalf of the Board of Directors of USR Parent, Inc (Staples).

In response to Staples’ offer, the ODP corporation issued its own letter. “The Board has unanimously concluded that there is a more compelling path forward to create value for ODP and its shareholders than the potential transaction described in your proposal,” wrote ODP Chairman Joseph Vassalluzzo.

Although Office Depot refused Staples’ proposal, the company said it’s willing to make other alternative deals. “We are open to combining our retail and consumer-facing e-commerce operations with Staples under the right set of circumstances and on mutually acceptable terms,” wrote Vassalluzzo.

In the letter, Office Depot said it is willing to consider a joint venture where both companies “would equally share the risks and benefits.” The company would also consider a partial-sale of its retail and consumer-facing e-commerce operations.

If Staples is willing to come to either of those agreements, they will still require regulatory approval. But, Office Depot says their options offer a less “regulatory risk” by pursuing a retail-only transaction. And, will “help maintain competitiveness against nontraditional retailers and optimize ongoing choices for consumers.”

In 1997 and 2016, the Federal Trade Commission blocked the two companies from merging. Who’s to say it won’t happen again, even with the changes Office Depot is telling Staples to make in its offer.

“What we do not plan to do, however, is engage in a transaction that, as history has shown, would likely result in a prolonged and expensive regulatory review process with no guarantee of success, without a commitment that Staples is willing to bear this risk through a customary “hell or high water” provision,” wrote Vassaluzzo.

Until Staples is willing to come to an agreement with Office Depot that doesn’t include a full takeover, ODP’s answer is a firm “no”.

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Business News

Big retailers are opting for refunds instead of returns

(BUSINESS NEWS) Due to increased shipping costs, big companies like Amazon and Walmart are opting to give out a refund rather than accepting small items returned.

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Package delivery people holding deliveries. Refund instead of returns are common now.

The holidays are over, and now some people are ready to return an item that didn’t quite work out or wasn’t on their Christmas list. Whatever the reason, some retailers are giving customers a refund and letting them keep the product, too.

When Vancouver, Washington resident, Lorie Anderson, tried returning makeup from Target and batteries from Walmart she had purchased online, the retailers told her she could keep or donate the products. “They were inexpensive, and it wouldn’t make much financial sense to return them by mail,” said Ms. Anderson, 38. “It’s a hassle to pack up the box and drop it at the post office or UPS. This was one less thing I had to worry about.”

Amazon.com Inc., Walmart Inc., and other companies are changing the way they handle returns this year, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal (WSJ). The companies are using artificial intelligence (AI) to weigh the costs of processing physical returns versus just issuing a refund and having customers keep the item.

For instance, if it costs more to ship an inexpensive or larger item than it is to refund the purchase price, companies are giving customers a refund and telling them to keep the products also. Due to an increase in online shopping, it makes sense for companies to change how they manage returns.

Locus Robotics chief executive Rick Faulk told the Journal that the biggest expense when it comes to processing returns is shipping costs. “Returning to a store is significantly cheaper because the retailer can save the freight, which can run 15% to 20% of the cost,” Faulk said.

But, returning products to physical stores isn’t something a lot of people are wanting to do. According to the return processing firm Narvar, online returns increased by 70% in 2020. With people still hunkered down because of the pandemic, changing how to handle returns is a good thing for companies to consider to reduce shipping expenses.

While it might be nice to keep the makeup or batteries for free, don’t expect to return that new PS5 and get to keep it for free, too. According to WSJ, a Walmart spokesperson said the company lets someone keep a refunded item only if the company doesn’t plan on reselling it. And, besides taking the economic costs into consideration, the companies look at the customer’s purchase history as well.

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Google workers have formed company’s first labor union

(BUSINESS NEWS) A number of Google employees have agreed to commit 1% of their salary to labor union dues to support employee activism and fight workplace discrimination.

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Google complex with human sized chessboard, where a labor union has been formed.

On Monday morning, Google workers announced that they have formed a union with the support of the Communications Workers of America (CWA), the largest communications and media labor union in the U.S.

The new union, Alphabet Workers Union (AWU) was organized in secret for about a year and formed to support employee activism, and fight discrimination and unfairness in the workplace.

“From fighting the ‘real names’ policy, to opposing Project Maven, to protesting the egregious, multi-million dollar payouts that have been given to executives who’ve committed sexual harassment, we’ve seen first-hand that Alphabet responds when we act collectively. Our new union provides a sustainable structure to ensure that our shared values as Alphabet employees are respected even after the headlines fade,” stated Program Manager Nicki Anselmo in a press release.

AWU is the first union in the company’s history, and it is open to all employees and contractors at any Alphabet company in the United States and Canada. The cost of membership is 1% of an employee’s total compensation, and the money collected will be used to fund the union organization.

In a response to the announcement, Google’s Director of People Operations, Kara Silverstein, said, “We’ve always worked hard to create a supportive and rewarding workplace for our workforce. Of course, our employees have protected labor rights that we support. But as we’ve always done, we’ll continue engaging directly with all our employees.”

Unlike other labor unions, the AWU is considered a “Minority Union”. This means it doesn’t need formal recognition from the National Labor Relations Board. However, it also means Alphabet can’t be forced to meet the union’s demands until a majority of employees support it.

So far, the number of members in the union represents a very small portion of Google’s workforce, but it’s growing every day. When the news of the union was first announced on Monday, roughly 230 employees made up the union. Less than 24 hours later, there were 400 employees in the union, and now that number jumped to over 500 employees.

Unions among Silicon Valley’s tech giants are rare, but labor activism is slowly picking up speed, especially with more workers speaking out and organizing.

“The Alphabet Workers Union will be the structure that ensures Google workers can actively push for real changes at the company, from the kinds of contracts Google accepts to employee classification to wage and compensation issues. All issues relevant to Google as a workplace will be the purview of the union and its members,” stated the AWU in a press release.

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