Connect with us

Business Marketing

What is Social Media’s Shelf Life?

Published

on


Virtual Real Estate

We’ve all heard them… You know, the Brokers and agents who disparage the use of technology and more specifically social media in your business practice. The conversation is something to the extent of “Get from behind that computer and go sell!” To an extent I agree. I know that technology is a good venue by which to obtain clients, but it is not the end all, be all of interacting with the consumer. The nature of humanity dictates that we interact with one another; that we have fellowship and contact with another person. If we’ve found a way to combine this need for interaction and the consumer’s desire to use technology to increase their knowledge base, than fantastic! If you really are hiding behind the computer and thinking that the cash will roll in, than you’ve missed the mark.

Study of Human Nature

Social Media is a great asset to a practitioner who has grasped human nature and is actually able to identify a consumer’s need. It’s not a good tool for those who still think that Real Estate is a get rich quick scheme. It requires time and patience to develop the necessary skills and knowledge base to properly execute any aspect of this business proficiently. It’s important to always be studying and researching what is happening in our culture, what trends are developing and how to be on the tip of the sword when it comes to progress. I feel that this is the key element to technology and Social Media in real estate. Is there a shelf life to Social Media? Yes, there is to every good thing; but we simply don’t know what that shelf life is. For some, Open Houses are still an effective means for connecting with clients. Open Houses have been around for generations.

Look to the Future

My advice is to use the tools of here and now, but don’t get stuck in a rut of what “is”, thinking that it is what you’ll need to master and then skate by for the next 20 years. Below is a video called Vision of Students tomorrow that I sometimes use in technology courses. I use it because the students are telling us how they communicate and some of the struggles they have while in college. Many people watch this video and say that it doesn’t apply, since those “kids” can’t buy… Go look at the demographics of buyers today and you’ll quickly realize that these college students will be your buyers in the next 5-10 years. Practitioners need to be forward thinking and while maintaining business today, also be thinking about what they’ll need for to prepare for tomorrow!


Matthew Rathbun is a Virginia Licensed Broker and Director of Professional Development for Coldwell Banker Elite, in Fredericksburg Virginia. He has opened and managed real estate firms, as well as coached and mentored agents and Brokers. As a Residential REALTOR®, Matthew was a high volume agent and past REALTOR® Rookie of the Year & Virginia Association Instructor of the Year. You can follow him on Twitter as "MattRathbun" and on Facebook. Matthew's blog is TheAgentTrainer.com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
24 Comments

24 Comments

  1. Ben Martin, CAE

    June 17, 2008 at 8:35 pm

    Social media as we know it will cease to exist eventually, but the consumer expectations it is ushering in will not. Even now I’m wondering what’s next. Perhaps it’s a good thing that I’m becoming somewhat bored by facebook, blogging and twitter.

  2. Chris

    June 17, 2008 at 9:08 pm

    I think we have entered an age of constant change. Those who will not adapt to the changes in society will not succeed. The gap between the haves and haves not, will change to who is technically involved and not involved.
    Spring Hill Real Estate

  3. Jayson

    June 17, 2008 at 11:27 pm

    That’s a good video. I’d say social media is here to stay but that social media will change over the years. It looks like the next step is an all inclusive website with social bookmarking, MySpace/Facebook profile pages, search engines, videos, life management tools and much more.

  4. Frank Jewett

    June 18, 2008 at 1:46 am

    Typical naivete. What are they learning sitting here? They are learning how to learn. How far would anyone here have gotten without the ability to learn? Who here learned by flipping through channels on cable television, which was the internet before there was an internet? What percentage of internet surfers regularly use the internet to learn something of value?

    You could download the entire Java platform in minutes, for free. You could find tutorials and tips that would enable you to implement Java to create your own web applications. Hands up all those who plan to make use of that wonderful, totally free resource any time soon? Me neither. I learn in classroom settings because it helps me focus and it keeps me accountable.

    The internet can be a wonderful aid to learning, providing the information of a thousand libraries in a matter of minutes, but those who confuse the internet with learning haven’t been paying attention. The internet is still more like cable TV (or 900-chat lines) than college. The kids who smiled about the number of Facebook profiles they will read and the pages of emails they will compose are the reason we are no longer competitive as a society. Many of them won’t be able to afford homes because they will have wasted their educational years on social networking instead of learning how to learn.

  5. Jennifer in Louisville

    June 18, 2008 at 4:47 am

    Really comes down to staying ahead of the curve – either you are a real estate leader, a follower, or a non-factor. Do old school techniques still work? Sure. Print ads, open houses, etc still have some success. But if you turn a blind eye toward other options, you are a dinosaur waiting to become extinct.

  6. Matthew Rathbun

    June 18, 2008 at 8:29 am

    Benn – Sorry to hear that you’re getting bored, I thought it might be me. I like Twitter, but honestly I am having issues both reading and writing original posts. I think that writing a local blog is much easier than an industry one. The local areas and growing, changing and gossiping. The industry has the same good and bad points that it’s always had.

    Frank – I too, see them as spoiled brats, but so did the generation before us as they reflected. The issue is that their sphere of influence is evolving just as this class is and they’ll be in a workforce with the same mentalities over time. I think the internet has it’s advantages for relaying information, but I still think a good old fashion classroom with a good instructor is the best learning environment. Even movies and TV shows about the future still have kids sitting in classes together. I just don’t think humans (as a majority) will get over their need for interaction… Good points!

  7. Benn Rosales

    June 18, 2008 at 8:33 am

    Fyi, Ben Martin wrote that comment, not Benn 😉

  8. Matthew Rathbun

    June 18, 2008 at 8:40 am

    Whoops! I actually knew that…. it was force of habit 🙂

  9. Bill Lublin

    June 18, 2008 at 8:42 am

    Provoking Post my Commonwealth Chum! 😉

    When I see things like this I feel really old.

    Not because the conversation is so new, but because it is not. The ONLY thing that is constant is change. And the debate over the new versus the old is part of a dialogue that goes back to Socrates complaining about the kids in Ancient Greece. The more things change the more they stay the same –

    I would disagree with Ben, Social Media is a catch phrase for the use of technology to facilitate a process that is as old as man, and a basic part of our herd instinct – networking and communicating. We can’t confuse the medium with the message (regardless of McLuhan’s comment that the medium is the message)- Whether it be parchment, snail mail, e-mail , twitter, blogging, or telepathy Benn will communicate. Though the medium might change, his desire to know more and share what he knows continues. What we do electronically changes the scope and speed of our communications, but not the content as much. And its the content that is most important. Can anyone tell me that Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense” is less important then this post because it was printed on paper? (Please note the nod to the great Commonwealth of Virginia)Or that the Magna Carta had less impact because it was written on parchment?

    I enjoyed the video, but the concept that something as basic as needing to accept change is new is a pain – even though I think its true – I’m just amazed that everybody isn’t aware of it yet – can’t we get the word out?

  10. Frank Jewett

    June 18, 2008 at 12:34 pm

    Matthew, I realize that throughout history, each generation has complained about the decline of civilization even as civilization kept marching forward. At this point in our history, I see a critical difference. We may still have the best universities in the world, but the young people taking full advantage of those universities are immigrants or the children of immigrants. The ability to use the internet to learn Java is real, but the young people using it that way are in Bangalore, not Boston. If you’re trying to look ahead to your client base ten years from now, look at building bridges to highly skilled, highly paid immigrants, because they will be driving our economy. This will be a challenge for an industry that has historically been led by the perspective of old, white men.

  11. Bob

    June 18, 2008 at 1:04 pm

    We may still have the best universities in the world, but the young people taking full advantage of those universities are immigrants or the children of immigrants.

    That has always been the case. We are a nation of immigrants.

  12. Frank Jewett

    June 18, 2008 at 1:11 pm

    Bob, I think you’ll find the split towards immigrants and first generation children of immigrants is more dramatic now than it has been in decades. The post-boomer generations have been complacent.

  13. Bob

    June 18, 2008 at 1:40 pm

    Frank, I think complacent is an apt description. We tend to expect opportunity to land in our lap while others seek it.

    Confucius say, “Man who wait for Peking Duck to fly into mouth will soon starve.”

    I think this applies to the narrow 2.0 mindset of some agents as well. The one that says “If I blog, they will come”.

  14. Frank Jewett

    June 18, 2008 at 4:31 pm

    Bob, several local brokers have expressed frustration with agents whose marketing plan consists of a website and/or blog and waiting patiently by the phone.

  15. Missy Caulk

    June 18, 2008 at 6:24 pm

    Matt, that is a powerful video. As a mother of 3 in college…I would have to agree with alot of it, especially buying those 100 and 200 text books that rarely get opened. Then sell on Amazon for 1.2 price.

  16. Bill Lublin

    June 18, 2008 at 6:43 pm

    We may still have the best universities in the world, but the young people taking full advantage of those universities are immigrants or the children of immigrants.

    SO three out of four of my my Grandparents were immigrants –
    Their children, went to those colleges, My Mom – Pennslyvania College of Optometry, her sisters , University of Pennsylvania, Derexel University,
    Their Children, Penn State, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Rutgers, Temple University, Princeton University, University of Pennsylvania (again) (and married two immigrants who also attended those schools)
    Their Children; Yale, Princeton, Syracuse, ….
    I think I can stop… these immigrants provided several Doctors, Lawyers, Economists, Business Owners, Professors, Artists, – So what’s the point when you say

    look at building bridges to highly skilled, highly paid immigrants, because they will be driving our economy

    What is new or insightful about that ? The immigrants and children of immigrants in my family helped drive the economy. With the exception of the Native American Population who isn’t an immigrant here? (And even they may have migrated from Asia over the land bridge) –
    Tacky Frank – just tacky

  17. Frank Jewett

    June 19, 2008 at 3:46 am

    Bill, I was referring only to the first generation of immigrants and their children, not every single generation that ever descended from an immigrant. You also seem confused about my purpose, which wasn’t to criticize or denigrate immigrants, but to point out that more recent immigrants are driving the economy.

    Here in Santa Clara County we have a very diverse population. Our organized real estate community is also diverse with Asian, Indian, Hispanic, and other affiliate groups modeled along the lines of affiliate groups like the Woman’s Council of Realtors.

    In my time in the industry, several people have privately questioned the purpose of these affiliate groups, posing the rhetorical question “What would they say if we formed a white men’s association of Realtors?”

    I didn’t have the nerve to point out that such organizations have existed for decades, from NAR to the state and local AORs. Affiliates like WCR formed because the needs of their membership were being ignored by the old white men running the business.

    Perhaps it has gotten better, but insiders tell me that we still have a long way to go and I believe it because the rhetorical question above is a direct quote I’ve heard on more than one occaision.

    What does this have to do with my earlier comments?

    Old attitudes about other cultures aren’t going to be competitive in the 21st century, at least not here in Santa Clara County. People who look down their noses at Asians, Indians, and other recent immigrants are going to be missing out on some of the most talented and successful members of our society.

  18. Bill Lublin

    June 19, 2008 at 3:56 am

    @Frank;
    Point taken – (I unruffle my feathers and apologize for the misunderstanding) – And I would agree with you, but I think that the “New Americans” have always had the best work ethics, because they usually come from harsher environments, and may not have had the opportunity to improve their situations before. Perhaps they are just more appreciative of what a wonderful place we live

    I agree with your comment about Associations. I belong to NAHREP as well as NAR (no I’m not Hispanic, but you don;t need to be to join, I’m just supportive of Hispanichome ownership – Helck – I think everyone should own real estate) The Greater Philadelphia Association of REALTORS is a charter member of NAR founded in 1908. In my time I have seen the first Female President and the First African American President (whose term was the year before mine IN THE 1990’S). And thank Goodness things have gotten some better – but there are savants and fools of every type-

    Guess we just need to keep working at- But it was fun trying to remember everyone’s schools and brag on the family a little bit 😉

  19. Frank Jewett

    June 19, 2008 at 4:04 am

    Here’s the citation I couldn’t find when I first responded to this post:

    “Two-thirds of the Ph.D.s in engineering awarded by U.S. universities went to non-U.S. citizens.” – Forbes

    Tying it back together, the attitude depicted in the video above is not the attitude of an over-achiever being held back by an antequated educational system, but rather the attitude of the spoiled brat who hasn’t made the connection between the ability to learn and the ability to achieve. Such people may well spend a disproportionate amount of their time on Facebook. They are falling behind.

    Am I disappointed? Nope. It’s human nature.

    I’m grateful that immigrants still see this country as the land of opportunity. We need their desire because our own is lacking, as shown by the statistic above. The forward thinking Realtor should spend as much time developing an appreciation for other cultures as she or he does learning how to blog and tweet.

  20. Frank Jewett

    June 19, 2008 at 4:14 am

    Bill, I’m sorry I didn’t take the time to find the Forbes quote when I first responded. It probably would have helped illustrate what I was talking about. My great grandfather used to say “shirt sleeves to shirt sleeves in three generations”, which was his way of describing how work ethic leads to opportunity which leads to success which leads to complacency over the course of a few generations. When I looked at that video, I saw ignorance and complacency. College isn’t about learning to sit in a seat, it’s about learning how to study, analyze, and learn because your ability to do those things will determine your success over the course of your life.

  21. Bill Lublin

    June 19, 2008 at 5:07 am

    Frank – Your Great Grandfather was a smart guy! And I agree completely with your analysis of the college opportunity, but let’s not forget the rest of the experience – football, bars, and parties (I was the Penn State guy obviously!)
    😀

  22. Jay Thompson

    June 19, 2008 at 7:28 am

    Thought I’d add something deep and profound to the conversation here:

    That video kicks ass.

  23. Sue

    June 20, 2008 at 7:50 am

    That was a good video… Obviously those kids are future home buyers and look how they spend their time! I believe its important to keep up with technology. Some of the old school ways work, but the real estate future seems to be constantly changing and evolving. The statistics and comparisons were interesting, really makes you think. I think I got lots more sleep than 7 hours when i was that age…Sad that only 18% of teachers knew the kids name.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business Marketing

Spruce up your product images with Glorify (just in time for Black Friday!)

(BUSINESS MARKETING) Want professional, customizable product images for your company? Consider Glorify’s hot Black Friday deal.

Published

on

Glorify app lets you create beautiful designs for your products.

Glorify, the app that creates high converting, customizable product images for your business, is offering a lifetime deal for $97 this Black Friday. In just a few clicks, you can transform one of Glorify’s sleek templates into personalized, professional-looking content – and now, you don’t have to pay that monthly fee.

Whether your business is in electronics, beauty, or food & drink, Glorify offers a range of looks that will instantly bring your product images to the next level. With countless font styles and the ability to alter icon styles, shadows and other elements, you can access all the perks of having your own designer without the steep price.

In 2019, Glorify was launched – the app was soon voted #2 Product of the Day and nominated for Best Design Tool by Product Hunt. Since then, they have cultivated a 20k+ user base!

Glorify 2.0, which was launched last week, upgrades the experience. The new and improved version of the app is complete overhaul of intuitive UI improvements and extra features, such as:

  • background remover tool
  • templates based on popular product niches and themes
  • design bundles for your website/store, social media
  • annotation tool
  • upload your brand kits and organize your projects under different brands
  • 1 click brand application
  • & much more!

“But the most important aspect of Glorify 2.0, is that it comes with a UI that sets us up for future scalability for all our roadmap features”, said CEO of Glorify Omar Farook, who himself was a professional graphic designer.

Farook’s dream was to provide a low-cost design service for the smaller businesses that couldn’t otherwise afford design services. Looking through reviews of the app, it’s evident that Glorify does just that – it saves the user time and money while helping them to produce top-notch product images for their brand on their own.

Glorify is one of the many new design-based apps that make producing content a breeze for entrepreneurs, such as Canva. As someone who loves design but doesn’t have the patience for Creative Cloud, I personally love this technology. However, Glorify is unique in that it is the only product-driven design app. All you have to do is upload your photo!

Continue Reading

Business Marketing

This new Chipotle location will be fully digital

(BUSINESS NEWS) In the wake of the pandemic and popularity of online delivery, Chipotle is joining the jump to online-only locations, at least to test drive.

Published

on

Chipotle exterior, possibly moving to a fully digital restaurant space soon.

A lot of industries have switched to an online-only model in the wake of the pandemic. Most of them have made sense; between abundant delivery options and increased restrictions on workers, moving away from the traditional storefront paradigm isn’t exactly a radical choice. Chipotle making that same decision, however, is a plot twist of a different kind—yet that’s exactly what they’re doing with their first online store.

To be clear, the chain isn’t doing away with their existing locations; they’re just test-driving a “digital” location for the time being. That said, the move to an online platform raises interesting questions about the future of the restaurant industry—if not just Chipotle itself.

The move to an online platform actually makes a lot of sense for businesses like Chipotle. Since the classic Chipotle experience is much less centered on the “dining” aspect than it is on the customizability of food options, putting those same options online and giving folks some room to deliver both decreases Chipotle’s physical footprint and, ostensibly, opens up their services to more people.

It’s also a timely move given the sheer number of people who are sheltering in place. A hands-on burrito assembly line is not the optimal place to be in a pandemic, but there’s no denying the utilitarian appeal of Chipotle’s products. To that end, having another restaurant wherein you have the option to order a hearty meal with everything you like—which is also tailored to your dietary needs—is a crucial step for consumers.

Chipotle’s CTO, Curt Garner, says he is hoping this online alternative will offer a “frictionless” experience for diners.

As a part of that frictionless experience, consumers will be able to order in several different mediums. Chipotle’s website and their mobile app are the preferred choices, while services like GrubHub will also be available should you choose to order through a third-party. The idea is simple: To bring Chipotle to you with as little fuss as possible.

For now, Chipotle is committing to the single digital location to see how consumer demand pans out. Should the model prove successful, they plan to move forward with implementing additional digital locations nationwide.

Continue Reading

Business Marketing

Your business’ Yelp listing may be costing you more than you think

(BUSINESS MARKETING) The pay per click system Yelp uses sounds good in theory, but it may be hurting small businesses more than helping.

Published

on

Man browsing Yelp for his business listing in open office environment.

We all know Yelp – we’ve probably all used Yelp’s comment section to decide whether or not that business is worth giving our money to. What you might not know is how they are extorting the small businesses they partner with.

For starters, it’s helpful to understand that Yelp generates revenue through a pay per click (PPC) search model. This means whenever a user clicks on your advertisement, you pay Yelp a small fee. You never pay Yelp a cent if no one clicks on your ad.

In theory, this sounds great – if someone is seeking out your product or service and clicks on your ad, chances are you’re going to see some of that return. This is what makes paying $15, $50, or even $100 a click worth it.

In practice, it’s not all it’s cracked up to be. When setting up your Yelp account, you are able to plug in keywords that correspond with your business. For example, owner of San Francisco-based Headshots Inc. Dan St. Louis – former Yelp advertiser turned anti-Yelp advocate – plugged in keywords for his business, such as “corporate photographer” and “professional headshots”. When someone in the Bay Area searches one of those terms, they are likely to see Headshots Inc.’s Yelp ad.

You are also able to plug in keyword searches in which your ad will not appear. That sounds great too – no need to pay for ad clicks that will ultimately not bring in revenue for your business. In the case of Headshots Inc., Dan plugged in terms such as “affordable baby photography” and “affordable studio photography”, as his studio is quite high-end and would very likely turn off a user who is using the word “affordable” in their search.

How Yelp really cheats its small business partners is that it finds loopholes in your keyword input to place your ad in as many non-relevant searches as possible. This ensures that your ad is clicked more and, as a result, you have to pay them more without reaping any of the monetary benefits for your business.

If you plugged in “cheap photography” to your list of searches in which your ad will not appear, Yelp might still feature your ad for the “cheap photos” search. As if a small business owner has the time to enter in every single possible keyword someone might search!

In the case of Headshots Inc., Dan ended up paying $10k in total ad spend to Yelp with very little return. Needless to say, he is pissed.

So what does this mean for you if you use Yelp for your business? If you don’t want to completely opt out of Yelp’s shenanigans, try these 3 tips from Dan:

  1. Try searching some potential irrelevant keywords – are your ads showing up in these searches?
  2. Do your best to block the irrelevant keywords. It’s impossible to get them all, but the more you do the more money you will ultimately save.
  3. Keep an eye on the conversation rate on your profile – does more clicks mean more client inquiries? Make sure Yelp isn’t sending low-quality traffic to your profile.

Ultimately, it’s about protecting your small business. Yelp is the latest in big tech to be outted for manipulating individuals and small businesses to up their margins – a truly despicable act, if you ask me. If you don’t have tens of thousands of dollars for ad spend, then either boycott Yelp or try these tips – your company may depend on it.

Continue Reading

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!