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How to know which type of workplace lets you thrive

(ENTREPRENEUR) Everyone wants to be a part of a productive, rewarding company, whether as employee or founder, but how do you find that?

Woman putting on her shoe representing passion for getting up to go to work.

Different strokes

Everyone thrives in different ways, enjoys different types of activities, prefers different kinds of environments. Duh.

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And that diversity is what makes the world go round – we can’t all be neurosurgeons or astronauts or painters or anything else, and most importantly, we don’t want to be.

Everyone wants to do well

I think it’s safe to say that everyone wants to be a part of a productive, rewarding company, whether as employee or founder. And everyone would probably like to be at their best at work, supported and challenged by colleagues. Saying you want to thrive at work is like listing “having fun” as one of your hobbies:

the point is how you have fun, and how you work best.

So how do you figure out the kind of company, the kind of workplace culture, that’s best for you? According to Bill Taylor of the Harvard Business Review, there are four main types of high-performance workplaces.

Community-based

Channel the Three Musketeers while you’re at work by prizing trust, collaboration, and loyalty over all else. Though this kind of workplace values customers, partners, and investors, employees are number one. Kent Thiry, the CEO of Davita – a Colorado-based health care provider – says his company is a “community first and a company second.” He goes on to explain: “We have flipped the means and the ends. Having an adequately profitable business is the means.”

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“Building a real community of human beings is the end.”

If you need to feel at home when you’re at work, a community-based workplace might be the best place for you.

Star-studded

Picture the opposite of the Three Musketeers, and you get this type of workplace. It’s every maniacal employee for themselves, and competition is a way of life. This kind of workplace is made up of a bunch of success-obsessed superstars, and it makes for a tough environment.

But if you’re talented and you like to dream big (and actively pursue those dreams), this kind of workplace could be the ideal place for you to thrive.

Investment banks and hedge funds often operate this way, and some law firms, consulting companies, and tech giants also embrace the competitive drive that forces employees to sink or swim. Mark Zuckerberg famously said, “Someone who is exceptional in their role is not just a little better than someone who is pretty good. They are 100 times better.”

Doing good

This kind of workplace is all about the large-scale impact of the employees. People who work in this kind of environment are often self-effacing and willing to sacrifice for the good of customers and other stakeholders. This doesn’t necessarily mean the organization is a non-profit out to save the bees or revive public education.

But this kind of workplace is mission-driven.

A great example is USAA: a financial services company that only – only – does business with active and retired members of the military, and their families. Employees of USAA are passionate about service, and that commitment to the customer has helped USAA maintain and grow a loyal base.

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Little and mighty

Some workplaces are a maze of hierarchy and protocol, and good work can get lost or mangled by the process. If you crave a sense of urgency in your work – not just a deadline, but an impetus to ideate and act – a small workplace with few obstacles could be your place to shine.

The revenue may not be massive, but it also could be a jackpot.

Sometimes the size of your workplace only guides your job satisfaction, not your company’s performance.

[clickToTweet tweet=”Now it’s time to take stock of your current organization, or the organizations you’re applying to.” quote=”Now it’s time to take stock of your current organization, or the organizations you’re applying to.”]

Are they driven by the things you want to drive you? Don’t just exist at your job, thrive. Look for the kind of company that will better your best.

#Thrive

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Written By

Staff Writer, Natalie Bradford earned her B.A. in English from Cornell University and spends a lot of time convincing herself not to bake MORE brownies. She enjoys cats, cocktails, and good films - preferably together. She is currently working on a collection of short stories.

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