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This AI robot wants to find leads for you

(MARKETING NEWS) It comes as no surprise that companies are figuring out ways to use AI for marketing. Let us introduce you to Albert, the AI marketer sure to help business boom.

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the making its way into every sector, including marketing campaigns. One tool in particular has found a way to simplify modern marketing by taking over menial tasks to run completely autonomous and successful campaigns.

Just ask one of their major clients, Harley Davidson, who raised their sales leads by over 2000% after switching to AI marketing.

Albert is the self-described first ever AI marketing platform and enterprise. Albert learns as a company grows, and autonomously analyzes data and optimizes campaigns to gain new leads.

Although many other platforms like Google and Facebook offer their own autonomous marketing systems, our pal, Al, can work across all channels. That means no more checking every separate channel to get an overview of marketing insights.

Not only does this save time, but it also saves money.

In the present digital age, it makes sense to let AI do the heavy lifting. When it comes to marketing, AI software is able to use online interactions to determine possible leads. For Harley Davidson, Albert generated leads from a large pool of potential customers that made purchases in the past, added items to their cart through the online shop and spent a significant amount of time on the site.

From this larger group, Albert developed smaller groups of “lookalikes,” or potential buyers, and tested out campaigns before implementing them.

This allowed Albert to predict appealing headlines and visuals, while also making adjustments to language that had tested better.

For example, Albert replaced the word “buy” to “call” as a call to action sent in emails and newsletters for customers to find out more about Harley Davidson’s top products.

As Harley Davidson experienced, AI marketing like Albert have the ability to make more accurate decisions that increase revenue and save time. Unlike traditional marketing tactics, Albert can make decisions based on actual data versus just guesswork. Without the ability to analyze online behavior, companies end up underestimating their potential buyer demographics.

Our pal, Al, is able to widen that figure, finding leads that were not even considered, and thus generate more business. The best part is that it is all done autonomously.

Natalie is a Staff Writer at The Real Daily and co-founded an Austin creative magazine called Almost Real Things. When she is not writing, she spends her time making art, teaching painting classes and confusing people. In addition to pursuing a writing career, Natalie plans on getting her MFA to become a Professor of Fine Art.

Real Estate Marketing

Instagram just doesn’t like you anymore (so now what?)

(REAL ESTATE MARKETING) Instagram removes like counts, is this good news or bad? Well it depends on how you use the platform, for personal gratification, or marketing.

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Instagram created a great amount of chatter last week when they finally began testing the removal of like counts on posts. This was something the social media giant had mentioned testing out years ago, with their reasoning being to help combat mental health issues associated with like counts.

I thought that this was great for personal accounts (as I’ll admit I’ve unnecessarily obsessed over how many likes a post has gotten). However, I thought this might be a little tricky for business accounts, as likes sometimes transfer to legitimacy.

As with anything else in my life, I turned to my best friend, Haley Palmer, for discussion. And, it just so happens that Haley is the social media and marketing specialist for a national health sciences company. So naturally, I wanted her take on it.

She asserted that this change may not be as detrimental as people were suspecting. “You’ll still see the engagement from people you trust,” says Palmer. This is a fair assessment, as you’re still able to scroll through who has liked a post – it’s just that you can no longer see the like count.

Palmer feels that this is a step in the right direction of making posts less about the perceived popularity and more about the content. “Instead of focusing on looking ‘cool’ or fitting in by liking something, you can focus on what’s being presented to you.”

A page could post something that is completely on-brand, but because of the time that it was posted or other elements out of their control, it may not get as many likes which could’ve once deemed it a “poor” post – performance wise, that is. Now that this is less of a stressor, an onlooker is able to focus more on what’s trying to be relayed rather than the number associated with it.

There’s still of course many complaints with Instagram – the ever-changing algorithms, the non-chronological timeline, the list goes on. However, removing the like count, and the recent removal of being able to see what and when your friends liked something (which I’ve seen cause many-a relationship problem) are both solid changes to making Instagram use a healthier experience.

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Real Estate Marketing

Stupid Facebook rule will not show your ad if you use these words

(REAL ESTATE MARKETING) Facebook has plenty of other things to worry about other than abbreviations, but your ad could go invisible if you use these…

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Social media advertising expert Jon Loomer has been in the game for a long time. You’d expect him to know any Facebook rule inside and out—so would he. So he was surprised when he uncovered a fairly niche rule that caused one of his recent ads to be rejected. Basically, don’t call FB “FB”.

Facebook’s rules require that ads not reference Facebook or Instagram in a way that goes against their brand guidelines. Since Loomer’s business involves educating people on Facebook marketing, he usually asks for a manual review and calls it a day. But this time around, someone specified that abbreviating Facebook and Instagram to “FB” and “IG” aren’t permitted in advertisements.

Surprisingly, Facebook will let you use the Facebook and Instagram logos in its ads, so long as you use the most up-to-date versions, and don’t spell their names wrong.

There’s no word on whether Facebook’s rebrand as FACEBOOK will be reflected in the new ad requirements, but that rebranding seems to be limited to the parent company, and not its flagship website and app. (That rebrand, the recipient of a great deal of online mockery, appears to be an attempt to dodge an FTC breakup.)

Facebook’s advertising side is notoriously difficult to work with. Advertisers do get customer support in a way that end users very much do not, but the rules can be ill-defined and selectively applied, especially if you’re working in a highly-regulated field.

And yet, Mark Zuckerberg recently stated outright that politicians, specifically, will be allowed to tell verifiable falsehoods in political ads on his platforms, framing the issue as a question of free speech. (Another fun little fact about Facebook’s advertising standards: In January 2018, they banned all cryptocurrency ads because they “are frequently associated with misleading or deceptive promotional practices.” Now they’re launching a cryptocurrency of their own.

Even as Facebook (er, sorry, FACEBOOK) expands into new arenas, its public persona is very much that of a multi-billion dollar company that somehow manages to be on its back foot all of the time. In April, Zuckerberg announced that it was going to become a “privacy-focused messaging and social networking platform,” roughly a year after appearing in Congress over Facebook’s spectacular failure to be a privacy-focused anything.

All that to say – if you’re running for office, you can lie all you want, but for the love of all that’s holy, don’t abbreviate Facebook to “FB,” or your ad will be rejected.

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Real Estate Marketing

Your website copy may be too hard to read; these services help

(MARKETING) Your website copy may be too dense, unreadable, and turning away sales. Here’s some tech to help you out.

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You’ve got a killer product or service you’re about to unleash on the world. The bank accounts are made, coffee pot is running, and you’re ready to start reeling in the sales. With your slick new website, you just know your phone is going to start ringing off the hook. But then, it doesn’t.

What gives? Bad UI? Typo in the phone number? One possible reason you’re not getting DM-ed may surprise you – your web copy.

Developing the clear-as-water copy that is going to get you hired or your product sold can be a toughie. Those words you loving poured your time and energy into might be making your potential leads mash the back button. Why? If you or one of your employees wrote the website, you can know your subject too well.

That expertise and familiarity, which makes you amazing at your job, can make it difficult for an outsider to understand what you do. The more difficult you make that understanding for your reader, the less likely you’ll turn a sale.

Case in point: Most people browsing the internet spend less than 15 seconds on a website. That means you have less than 15 seconds to hook your potential client before they remember they have a cat video to finish.

Many a great business died on a piles of jargon, dense sentences and trendy buzzwords. But never fear! Since hiring an army of copywriters is cost-prohibitive, we’ve got some suggestions on services you can use to make that copy do work.

Clarity Grader

Clarity Grader allows you to put a website’s full text into its grading portal or even analyze a url. What you get is a free plain language report and clarity score emailed to you. Of course, if you want the ultimate features, you’ll definitely have to pay for them.

But Clarity Grader’s paid options runs hundreds of checks on your copy, including spell checking, broken link checking and consistency checks. Plus, there’s a free trial to figure out if you want to spend the dough on the premium features for this nifty proofreader.

Jargon Grader

If you’re more worried about relying too hard on jargon, Jargon Grader is a free web-based service without many bells or whistles. Just paste the concerning text into the text box and it’ll run checks and highlight which words detract from your writing. Jargon Grader also reminds you “that some over-used words may be acceptable in context.” A quick run through Jargon Grader, and you’ll be zapping all your buzzwords in no time.

Hemingway Editor

Hemingway Editor isn’t just for fiction writers. Another free web-based service, Hemingway Editor helps you emulate the bold and concise style of Ernest Hemingway. It flags words and phrases for readability, passive voice and conciseness. Hemingway Editor even highlights adverbs to keep you crystal clear.

If you’re trying to make a sale, web copy shouldn’t hedge or hide under lots of needless words. Run your words through Hemingway Editor and be bold.

Grammarly

The Big Daddy of web and desktop free-mium apps, Grammarly is a must for any small or solo enterprise. Grammarly does seemingly countless grammatical, spelling and clarity checks on what you write. It does paywall some of the clarity features, but by cobbling together all the other services plus free Grammarly, you should be covered.

And, bonus, the extension can be installed in almost every facet of your business (email, web-browser, phone apps). That means no one will be confused by how your website reads crystal clear and how your emails read like a ransom note.

So whether you’re a broker trying to save coin or an army-of-one real estate tech freelancer, arm yourself with a few nifty tech tools, and you’ll start improving your lead generation efforts.

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