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Hilarious, terrible listing’s pics make us question the legality of virtual staging

(MARKETING) Real estate staging improves any listing’s appeal, but done poorly and virtually leads to an unintentional laughing stock.

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Real estate practitioners and photographers know you can’t Photoshop out the brown grass or ugly power lines in a listing’s photos. There’s major liability if you misrepresent the property you’re trying to sell. You already know that. But what about artificially adding in elements?

Clients often stage homes to give it that ready to move in feel. Staging gives potential buyers a chance to visualize what can fit into a space and at some price points is expected. The rise of virtual staging software and augmented reality apps speak to the power of staging. Professional staging.

However, virtual staging is best left to buyers to pursue on their own. Virtual staging in images of an actual home for sale is a big no-no. Surely no one would really use faked photos for a professional listing though, right?

Think again. We invite you to soak up this unintentionally hilarious listing in Massachusetts, featuring fake staging, ambitious proportions, and impossible furniture angles.

While the home looks perfectly normal and real from the outside, treat yourself to a journey of the interior:

Behold, a rug to make even non-OCD folks cringe. The other pieces are pretty convincing, and they would have gotten away with it too if it wasn’t for that meddling rug angle.

While the virtual additions may be well-intentioned, this visual trickery makes it difficult to tell what’s truly included in the house. Is that built-in cabinet really there, or is it more Photoshop magic?

The kitchen seems pretty harmless in terms of fakery, but honestly it’s a little hard to tell what’s included or how physics works properly. You have to squint a bit to discover that you’ll need to install your own pot and pan rack (and 10 pound wheel of cheese), setting false expectations for buyers.

If a buyer falls in love with an element that was artificially added, a real life tour could lead to heartbreak (not to mention legalities around what conveys).

You’re not doing future homeowners any favors by faking the inside. Staging gives potential buyers a chance to visualize what can fit into a space. Digitally displaying furniture at wonky angles and haphazard proportions doesn’t give an accurate depiction of the home.

This example may be eye-wateringly laughable, but fudging details about the home you’re trying to sell has serious negative implications. Even if adding elements is meant to be helpful, it is dishonest. Especially when it’s done this poorly.

Include real pictures, and let potential buyers play around with augmented reality and digital design. Providing dimensions of rooms would be more helpful than ‘shopping in fake furniture.

Editing photos for better lighting is okay, but removing or adding elements reduces the integrity of your listing. Avoid a world of headache and potential litigation by accurately representing the property. If you can’t legally edit items out of listing photos, can you legally edit items into them?

Lindsay is an editor for The American Genius with a Communication Studies degree and English minor from Southwestern University. Lindsay is interested in social interactions across and through various media, particularly television, and will gladly hyper-analyze cartoons and comics with anyone, cats included.

Real Estate Brokerage

Refocusing your team before sales plummet

(REAL ESTATE) It’s that time of year again – holidays distract and procrastination sets in, so here’s how to refocus your team before they are led astray by the calendar.

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This time of year is always difficult in terms of focus. We universally obsess over resolutions and try to be motivated to perfect our lives, but by this week, reality has set in and we still haven’t bought a home in Belize or lost 25 lbs.

If you’re a broker or team manager and are noticing this lethargy or discouraged state with your team, consider stepping up as a leader to get the team to refocus.

As the seasons change, so can our moods. It can be helpful to have quarterly check-ins with your team (either one-on-one or as a group) to discuss current methods, trends, what’s expected on either side, and what can be improved.

This form of open communication helps employees de-stress and may help them recharge and regain motivation. Another communicative form can be found in surveys.

Sending check-in surveys via email to your team to assess their feelings of the workload, the market, and to voice any concerns they have – it can be a great way to open the door for bigger, more important conversations. These surveys can be formatted to be answered anonymously, as well.

Be sure to always be accessible and focused yourself, as you’re setting the barometer of expectation. Allowing for this open communication can let you know what can be improved on your end, which can aid in refocusing.

Another way to bring your team together is by taking everyone out for a quarterly lunch. This helps your agents to bond, while also feeling like their work is being appreciated; therefore, motivating them to keep on producing well.

At the end of the day, you can’t be everyone’s friend, soo, if you’re observing behavior that seems to be unproductive or unfocused, don’t be afraid to speak frankly. Sometimes all it takes is for that behavior to be acknowledged to convince someone to step up their game.

Remember – each team and each manager is different. The attempt to get everyone on the same page and to continuously make strides as a team can take trial and error, but it’s something to always be cognizant of to avoid issues in the future and keep sales on track.

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Real Estate Brokerage

Financial tool indie brokers can use to act more like the mega brokerages

(FINANCE) Indie brokers are often more focused on marketing than operations, but there are tools available to boost business and act more like the big boys.

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There are so many variables that go into operating an independent brokerage; so much so, that it makes coming up with the brokerage model look like the easy part.

One of the variables that takes (often the most) priority is money. You need to know what you’re spending versus what you’re making and how that adds up (pun intended).

Luckily, there are people out there laser focused on making sure that your business is properly tracking cash flow. One such business is flowpilot.

“flowpilot is the easiest way for businesses to plan and manage their cash flow actively. Cash flow planning has never been this easy!” said Founder and CEO, Bernd Thöne. “Simply upload your accounting data and get an overview of your current and forecasted cashflow. Recognize risks and optimization potentials early as they arise and get tips how to eliminate them. Make better decisions by easy and quick simulations simply without effort.”

Additionally, flowpilot presents a user’s liquidity in clear diagrams after analyzing the cash flow. It also allows a user to see projections up to five years in the future. Features include: precise liquidity management, sound decisions, and cash flow control liquidity calculation.

With flowpilot, users can achieve full transparency about the liquidity of their company. This way, they always know exactly where they stand and flowpilot can help you to make informed decisions.

The system uses real-time data in combination with AI algorithms to calculate liquidity forecasts and scenarios. With this, users can plan more strategically and create secure forecasts.

For liquidity calculations – flowpilot is serves as a financial advisor that is available at all times – the evaluation of a user’s financial data is handled by the program’s AI system.

Users register for free (a 14-day free trial is currently available), upload their initial bookkeeping, and then receive a monthly historical overview of their company, and the ability to intelligently plan cash flow as users automatically receive an informed liquidity plan for the next 12 months.

Lastly, you can recognize risks early on and switch to optimizing finances with scenarios built into the platform.

The company boasts itself as easy, smart, and fast. With a 14-day free trial, it could very well be worth a try for your brokerage for a competitive advantage in a world where only the mega-brokers financially forecast.

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Real Estate Brokerage

Is there a difference between leadership and management?

(REAL ESTATE) The two terms, leadership and management, are often used interchangeably, but there are substantial differences; let’s explore them.

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Some people use the terms “leader” and “manager” interchangeably, and while there is nothing inherently wrong with this, there is still a debate regarding their similarities or differences.

Is it merely a matter of preference, or are there cut and dry differences that define each term?

Ronald E. Riggio, professor of leadership and organizational psychology at Claremont McKenna College, recently described what he felt to be the difference between the terms, noting the commonality in the distinction of “leadership” versus “management” was that leaders tend to engage in the “higher” functions of running an organization, while managers handle the more mundane tasks.

However, Riggio believes it is only a matter of semantics because successful and effective leaders and managers must do the same things.

They must set the standard for followers and the organization, be willing to motivate and encourage, develop good working relationships with followers, be a positive role model, and motivate their team to achieve goals.

He states that there is a history explaining the difference between the two terms: business schools and “management” departments adopted the term “manager” because the prevailing view was that managers were in charge. They were still seen as “professional workers with critical roles and responsibilities to help the organization succeed, but leadership was mostly not in the everyday vocabulary of management scholars.”

Leadership on the other hand, derived from organizational psychologists and sociologists who were interested in the various roles across all types of groups; so, “leader” became the term to define someone who played a key role in “group decision making and setting direction and tone for the group.

For psychologists, manager was a profession, not a key role in a group.” When their research began to merge with business school settings, they brought the term “leadership” with them, but the terms continued to be used to mean different things.

The short answer is no, the two terms are not the same; simply because leaders and managers need the same skills to productive and respected.

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