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How to be the best potential employee in your job hunt [INTERVIEW]

(BUSINESS MARKETING) Struggling in the job hunt? You’re not alone – but Nicole Clark, a Senior Professional in HR, has some advice to help you stand apart from the crowd.

Interviewer writing on clipboard talking to person across a table during their job hunt.

The job hunt is a journey not often enjoyed by the potential employee. It can take a lot of searching, a lot of resume tweaking, and a lot of interviewing, in order to find a good fit. Sometimes, it takes more than that, and you need a little insight from an expert about how to go about the job search. Luckily, we have Senior Professional in Human Relations (SPHR), Nicole Clark, on tap to give us the inside scoop.

Taylor Leddin: What’s the number one thing a HR specialist looks at when reviewing a candidate?
Nicole Clark: When reviewing a candidate’s resume, it’s always imperative to ensure they have the fundamental skills needed in a position. When I move forward with conducting a phone screen or in person interview, it’s always important to ensure they’re a good fit from a cultural standpoint. Every company has its own unique culture and it’s important for hires to fit that culture otherwise it will eventually lead to issues down the line. With that being said, every candidate has their own personality and unique traits that they will bring to the role. However, the best hires are those that are able to make strong individual contributions while also working well within a team setting, which is why cultural fit ends up playing such an important role.

TL: What’s your biggest pet peeve with the job application process?
NC: My personal pet peeve is when candidates are not honest about their salary expectations during the beginning stages of the interview process. It’s frustrating when a candidate is in the final stages of an offer being made and they suddenly have high earning expectations that are not aligned with the company’s salary structure. I do not at all mind when candidates negotiate and are aware of their worth, but it’s a different story when all of the sudden candidates are asking for way more money than what we initially discussed. It’s important for candidates to be honest throughout the process about their expectations to ensure everyone is on the same page.

I also find it disheartening when candidates are only focused on the benefits and perks of the position as opposed to their job responsibilities. I understand that benefits are important, but it’s a red flag when candidates are asking me about how many days off they are going to receive during the initial phone screen. It makes me question candidates’ work ethic and also their priorities. I enjoy taking time off too, but those benefits will be discussed when the timing is appropriate, so it’s best to let the company lead that discussion when the timing is right.

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TL: What advice do you have for people currently on the job hunt?
NC: Searching for a job is not easy and it can be a very demoralizing process. I think it’s important to not limit yourself during the initial application process. When I was job searching, I would apply to as many jobs as possible even if they did not appear to be “perfect” on paper. Every interview you have is good practice and allows you to better understand what exactly you are looking for in a position. Also, it’s important to remember that there is no “perfect” job! Every job is going to have downsides, but the best jobs are those where you enjoy both the work and the people who you are working with.

TL: Since you’ve been on both sides of the interview table, what would you say is the most important thing about interviewing?
NC: To me, the most important thing about interviewing is to be yourself and to remember that you’re interviewing the company too. While they are looking for the best person for the role, you’re also looking for the best position for the next step of your career. It’s important to ask questions and really understand the role that you’re going to have in the company. While it’s completely understandable to be nervous during the job hunt, it’s important to remember that they want to find the best person for the position and for them to do so, they need to really meet the real you.

Staff Writer, Taylor Leddin is a publicist and freelance writer for a number of national outlets. She was featured on Thrive Global as a successful woman in journalism, and is the editor-in-chief of The Tidbit. Taylor resides in Chicago and has a Bachelor in Communication Studies from Illinois State University.

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  1. Pingback: Job seekers, just say no to one-way video interviews

  2. Pingback: You should say no to one-way video interviews - The American Genius

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