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How your HR department is destroying your brand

(Business News) Your HR department is on the front lines, but many in the department are hurting your brand – here’s how it is happening right in front of you, and how to fix it.

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human resources

The modern job hunt

I’ve been watching my son’s job hunt as of late with great curiosity after having spoken at a Human Resources Management Association (HRMA) conference a few years back, where I chastised their lust for more new systems rather than utilizing their existing systems. Oh, the gasps I received for pointing out positive ways to promote their brand, and reminding them strongly that they are on the front line of their brand image (most especially with applicants).

I watched as the younger professionals nodded in absolute agreement, and veteran human resources management folks cringed at the idea that they had a responsibility to better interact with applicants, i.e. social media, responsive email, or just being responsive with new applicants at all.

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How simple would it be to include a thank you acknowledgment email, and then listing community resources to local job boards, job re-training opportunities, or even promoting their own HR blog that suggests what the company is looking for in a resume, best practices for job hunting, and so much more… oh the horror! You’d have thought I set the building on fire and locked the door! But having said that, many were inspired enough to speak with me afterwards for more ideas, and application of some of the social implementation, and how to integrate the same relationship with currently employed team members – I had hope.

Fast forward to today, and guess what?

Well, the human resource departments got new systems alright – they can now completely disenfranchise applicants online now. “Online Application” is now the online file 13, and hey, many managed to ignore even the common courtesy of letting the applicant know that an application was even received. And of course, there will be no help with any glitches the applicant may run into such as, your social security number is invalid, say what?

They even found newer ways to aggravate the applicant by defaulting applicants into “sell your information” companies like snagajob.com where your information is sent to participating online ‘Universities’ that endlessly call without warning. Watch out for companies like Kohl’s in particular. Now you’re making money while ignoring applicants?

Consider this analogy

Here’s the analogy I gave HRMA in my presentation: I’m a young kid, who on Friday nights curls up with mom, dad, and family with popcorn and Coca-Cola. This weekly treat as a kid was epic, and I love Coca-Cola. As a child, I thought that one day I might like to work for this magical company – their commercials were so appealing, especially at Christmas. Needless to say, this memory made me a huge fan of Coca-Cola growing up. Fast forward to applying for a job with Coca-Cola (this never happened, but stick with me) where I apply either on paper or online, and I’m ignored, not unqualified, just ignored.

I apply again in 60 days. Same thing, file 13 and so on and so forth – I now bleeping hate you Coca-Cola, crushed fan, even worse, ignored. Do you know how much effort and dollars advertising and marketing spent to make me a fan over all of those years, and this is how it ends? Bleep you, I’ll have tea.

This applies to all companies, so here’s the answer

This could be said of nearly any company out there that does not understand that this is a tandem endeavor throughout the company to attract brand fans whose point of final sale might just be with your brand’s HR department. This has to change. You must do better.

My son is on month two of his job search, and the most response he’s received was from those who wanted his money and his information for that ridiculous company, snagajob.com. Thank you Kohl’s and so many other stupid decision makers in human resources.

Every CEO should immediately do three things –

(1) Have their HR director read this in front of you and watch their reaction – nodding in agreement and you’re fine, but an annoyed director means you’re in trouble.

(2) I think every CEO should force their HR director to job hunt for the type of job they are hiring for, especially if it is entry level, for two weeks of unpaid leave just to experience how it would feel should they be “unemployed.” Seriously.

(3) When hiring an HR Director, ask how long they’ve been on the job hunt, where have other HR departments FAILED, and how they propose to do their lion share of making sure your company isn’t leaking talent and fans to file 13 in those same ways.

P.S. Still Loving Coca-Cola over here.
P.P.S. Use Snagajob and other sites at your own risk.
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Benn Rosales is the Founder and CEO of The American Genius (AG), national news network for tech and entrepreneurs, proudly celebrating 10 years in publishing, recently ranked as the #5 startup in Austin. Before founding AG, he founded one of the first digital media strategy firms in the nation and also acquired several other firms. His resume prior includes roles at Apple and Kroger Foods, specializing in marketing, communications, and technology integration. He is a recipient of the Statesman Texas Social Media Award and is an Inman Innovator Award winner. He has consulted for numerous startups (both early- and late-stage), has built partnerships and bridges between tech recruiters and the best tech talent in the industry, and is well known for organizing the digital community through popular monthly networking events. Benn does not venture into the spotlight often, rather believes his biggest accomplishments are the talent he recruits, develops, and gives all credit to those he's empowered.

Business News

How remote work has changed over the last decade

(BUSINESS NEWS) let’s reflect on how remote working and telecommuting has changed in recent years and look to how it will continue to change in the 2020s.

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As someone who often works remote, it’s interesting to see how much that means for work has evolved. The increase in commonality has been steady, and shows no signs of slowing down. Go Remotely has developed an insightful graphic showing the changes in trends regarding remote work over the years.

“For decades, the established economy dictated that you should pick one job, visit the same office for the next 40 years, and then retire,” reads the graphic’s intro. “However, recent remote working stats suggest the working world might be in for some revolutionary changes.”

From there, the graphic is broken down into five facets: Flexible Workspace Policy, Entrepreneurial Minds, Telecommuting is a Growing Trend, The Role of Companies in the Remote Working World, and The Future of Telecommuting.

With Flexible Workspace Policy, its suggested that telecommuting could be a solution for costly issues including lack of productivity caused by employee distractions, health problems, etc. It is said that employers lose $1.8 trillion annually due to these issues.

The end of 2018 found 35 percent of the US workforce working remotely. This is only expected to climb. Ten percent of employees don’t know if their company offers flexible work policies (this is something to check into!)

Bills and laws for virtual jobs passed by governments reflect the need for accessibility, economic stability, and emigration concerns. Companies with flexible work policies have reported seeing increases in productivity and profits. (Funny those both start with pro, no?)

With Entrepreneurial Minds, a few interesting things found include: remote workers are less likely to take off if they are sick, the majority reports better productivity when working alone, the majority reported lower stress levels. However, there is a problem with not being able to unplug after work which is an issue for some.

Telecommuting is a Growing Trend finds that there has been a seven percent increase between 2012 and 2016, with the majority (80-100 percent) reporting they work remotely. Industries seen embracing remote work include: transportation, computer/information systems/mathematical, arts/design/entertainment/sports/media, finance/insurance/real estate, law or public policy, community/social services, science/engineering/architecture, manufacturing or construction, healthcare, education/training/library, and retail.

The Role of Companies in the Remote Working World finds that the pros to hiring remote workers includes: finding talent outside of your geographic area, improves retention on work/life balance, increases productivity by decreasing commute time, and saves money by requiring less office space. The cons include lack of timeliness when it comes to receiving information from employers.

Finally, the Future of Telecommuting suggests that in 2020 the US mobile worker population will surpass 105 million (and will account for 72 percent of the US workforce). Hiring managers predict that telecommuting will increase tremendously, most skills will become even more niche over the next decade, and many think that 38 percent of their full-time workers will be working remotely in the next decade.

How do you feel about the increase in remote working and telecommuting?

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Business News

ClickUp team productivity app is gorgeous and wildly efficient

(BUSINESS NEWS) Seeking to improve your productivity and speed up your team, ClickUp is an inexpensive option for those obsessed with efficiency.

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Back again to obsess over productivity apps – ClickUp, is a project management tool seeking to knock the frustration out of PM. It’s getting some good reviews, so I gave it a try for a week by setting up my current job search as a project and getting a feel for the app. And as you’ve read in my other reviews, we will address features and design.

On the feature front, ClickUp offers a pretty standard set up of tools for a productivity app. What stands out first and foremost are the status options. In general, most productivity statuses are simple: not started, started, in progress, done, etc.

But ClickUp lets you set up custom statuses that match your workflow.

For example, if you’re doing instructional design projects, you may assign projects based on where they are flowing in an ADDIE model, or if you are a Realtor, you may have things cataloged by sold, in negotiation, etc.

Customization is king and custom status is the closest you get to building your own app. And if you like it simple, you don’t have to customize it. The assigned comments feature lets you follow up on specific comments that originate action items – which is useful in team collaborations.

You can also assign changes to multiple tasks at once, including changing statuses (I would bulk assign completion tasks when I finished applications that I did in batches). There a lot of features here, but the best feature is how the app allows you to toggle on and off features that you will or won’t use – once again, customization is front and center for this platform.

In terms of design and intuive use, ClickUp nailed it.

It’s super easy to use, and the concept of space is pretty standard in design thinking. If your organization uses Agile methodology, this app is ready for you.

In terms of view, you can declutter the features, but the three viewing modes (list, box, and board) can help you filter the information and make decisions quickly depending on what role you have on a board or project. There is also a “Me” board that removes all the clutter and focuses on your tasks – a great way to do focused productivity bursts. ClickUp describes itself as beautifully intuitive, and I can’t disagree – both the web app and mobile app are insanely easy to use.

No complaints here.

And the horizon looks good for ClickUp – with new features like image markup, Gannt charts (!!!!!! #nerdalert), and threaded comments for starts.

This application is great, and it’s got a lot of growth coming up to an already rich feature base. It’s free with 100MB of storage, but the $5 fee for team member per month that includes team onboarding and set up (say you’re switching from another platform) and Dropbox/Google Docs integration? That’s a bargain, Charlie.

ClickUp is on the way up and it’s got it all – features, a beautifully accessible UI, relentless customization, and lot of new and upcoming features. If you’re into the productivity platform and you’re looking for a new solution for your team, go check it out.

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Business News

Should you alter your business travel due to the Coronavirus?

(BUSINESS NEWS) Got a business trip coming up? Worried about the coronavirus spoiling those plans? Stay up to date and safe with this cool site!

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travel coronavirus

The Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at John Hopkins University has created a website that tracks one of the biggest trends of 2020: the coronavirus. Also known as 2019-nCoV, this disease has already spread to over 40,000 confirmed cases worldwide, with over 900 deaths (as of when this article was published, anyway.)

Not to mention, the United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that we still don’t know exactly how the virus spreads from person-to-person. In fact, there’s quite a bit we don’t know about this disease and although some people are reported as recovered, it’s only a small fraction compared to how many are sick.

So, what’s so great about this tracker? Well, first of all, it updates in real time, making it easy to keep track of everything we know about confirmed cases of the coronavirus. It’s chock full of statistics and visuals, making the information easy to digest. Plus, with a map front and center, it lets you know exactly where there have been reported outbreaks – and how many people have been diagnosed.

Because the site sticks to cold hard facts like statistics and maps, it also means you can avoid the racism and general panic that’s accompanied news of this outbreak.

This is a great tool for staying informed, but it’s also extremely helpful if you’re going to be traveling for work. As the virus continues to progress, you’ll be able to see just how many cases of coronavirus there are in the areas you’re planning to visit, which will allow you to plan accordingly. Even if you don’t feel the effects, you can still risk passing it to other people.

(In fact, the CDC recommends those traveling from certain areas in China practice “social distancing” when they return to the US, avoiding public spaces like grocery stores, malls and movie theaters.)

Of course, if you have something planned several months from now, don’t cancel your conference plans just yet. A lot can happen in that amount of time, so avoid the urge to check the website every couple hours. It’s supposed to be a tool for staying informed, not staying stressed out.

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