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Yellen tells graduates they’re entering strongest job market in a decade (can you say misleading?)

(BUSINESS NEWS) Yellen spoke before current graduates, touting a strong job market and as far as we know, everyone in the audience kept a straight face instead of laughing (or crying).

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The perils of pragmatism

US President Harry Truman once famously stated, “Give me a one-handed economist! All my economists say, ‘on one hand … on the other.’” Chairman of the Federal Reserve Janet Yellen’s latest remarks on the labor market call Truman’s exhortation for a clearer picture to mind.

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Speaking to the graduating class at the University of Baltimore, Yellen said that the graduates were “entering the strongest job market in nearly a decade,” with a low unemployment rate of 4.6 percent, equal to pre-recession numbers. While the picture isn’t as bleak as what new entrants into the labor market faced during the recession, the numbers aren’t quite the rosy picture that Yellen paints.

By the numbers

The U.S. unemployment rate is determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. They conduct a monthly survey of nearly 110,000 people, who are identified by geographic location and characteristics that are as representative as possible of the workforce.

These individuals are rotated quarterly so that no one is counted for more than four consecutive months. This leaves a monthly sample that is 75 percent stable with a 50 percent annual residual.

Participants in the survey are questioned about their job status and/or labor force activity during the week covered in the survey.

Seems simple, right?

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Well, it depends on which unemployment rate you want to focus on. The 4.6 percent number Yellen stated in her speech is based on what’s known as the U-3 unemployment rate.

This rate doesn’t take into account individuals who are either working part-time because that’s the only type of job that the can find or those considered “marginally attached” to the labor force.

Marginally attached and missing workers

People considered “marginally attached” are those who want work, and have looked for work at some time in the past year, but are at the moment neither working or looking for work.

Workers in these situations are counted in the U-6 unemployment rate, which currently stands at 9.3 percent. This is significantly lower than the heights of the recession, but more than double the number that Yellen cited.

The Economic Policy Institute, a Washington, D.C. think tank, estimates that there are approximately 2.3 million such “missing workers” in the United States. This includes those working part time jobs because no other options are available for them, or who have stopped looking entering the holiday season.

The St. Louis branch of the Federal Reserve places the current labor force participation rate at 62.7 percent, the lowest since the recession. It’s also the lowest the United States has seen in any period, recession or non-recession, since December 1977.

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A brave new world

As graduates enter the workforce, they face a recovering labor market. But it is one that is more fiercely competitive than ever before, without a place for many qualified people who want to work.

Expectations that seemed de rigeur even a generation ago for graduates entering the job market now no longer apply. Even entry-level jobs prefer that potential employees come to them with some form of experience, as well as impeccable grades. Jobs that are available are often part-time to avoid the vesting of benefits, spread across the world due to the globalization of the economy.

Congratulations on graduation, indeed, but perhaps married with condolences.

#JobMarket

Roger is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds two Master’s degrees, one in Education Leadership and another in Leadership Studies. In his spare time away from researching leadership retention and communication styles, he loves to watch baseball, especially the Red Sox!

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Scott

    December 29, 2016 at 12:01 am

    And yet, even if you use a different measure for unemployment, it is the best it has been in a decade. her statement is true, not misleading. if you’re asking is it the best job market in 20 years? no 🙂

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Business News

Think LuLaRoe is a pyramid scheme? Founders say your opinion’s uneducated

(BUSINESS NEWS) LuLaRoe Founders fight back against allegations saying that they’re a disruptive business model, not a pyramid scheme, and anyone that disagrees is uneducated…

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Clothing company LuLaRoe insists that they are not a “pyramid scheme” despite recent class-action lawsuits claiming that the company lured retailers into buying thousands of dollars’ worth of unsellable merchandise.

LuLaRoe uses “multi-level marketing” to sell their products, meaning that the company sells merchandise to “consultants” – most of them women working from home who resell the merchandise to their neighbors and friends at home parties. The idea is that moms who want to stay home with the kids will have an independent way of making an income.

Last month, two class-action lawsuit were filed against LuLaRoe, claiming that the company makes the vast majority of its profits off of women who sign up to be consultants, rather than from sales to the end-users.

Plaintiffs say they have lost thousands of dollars because LuLaRoe aggressively pushes consultants to buy up to $20,000 worth of merchandise that can’t sell, either because the markets is flooded, or because the products are poor – one suit claiming that the fabrics tear like “wet toilet paper.”

“The vast majority of consultants sitting at the bottom of defendants’ pyramid were and remain destined for failure and unable to turn any profit,” says one suit. “Some resulted in financial ruin due to pressure to max out credit cards and to take loans to purchase inventory.”

The suits further claim that when women have tried to get out of the business, LuLaRoe has refused to take back and refund unsold merchandise, while also telling former consultants that they can no longer sell the products. Thus, consultants are stuck with thousands of dollars of merchandise that they can’t sell sitting in their garages and basements.

Deanne and Mark Stidham, founders of LuLaRose, tell CBS that it isn’t a pyramid scheme and that anyone who thinks so has an “uneducated opinion.”

Says Deanne Stidham, “You get the product, you put it before people, and you sell it, and you have money, and that’s the simplicity of this business and that’s as easy as it can be.”

The Stidhams implied that jealous retailers were encouraging plaintiffs to sue because the LuLaRoe model has been “disruptive in the marketplace.”

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Class action lawsuit claims Tesla plant is a hotbed of racism

(BUSINESS NEWS) Tesla is being hit with another lawsuit, this time alleging discrimination at one of their plants. No wonder Musk wants to get to Mars…

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Groundbreaking automaker Tesla may be the future of automotive transportation, but when it comes to discrimination, some say the company seems to be living in the past.

This week, the company received notice that they would be brought to court by a group of black workers filing a class action lawsuit. The suit states that the Tesla’s Fremont, California production plant is a “hotbed of racist behavior.”

The suit was filed by former employee Marcus Vaughn in the California state court in Oakland and is the third lawsuit filed this year by black workers and former workers from Tesla.

Vaughn, who began working in the factory in April, says that his supervisors regularly referred to him using racial slurs. When he wrote a complaint to the human resources department, they were unresponsive. Then in October, Vaughn was fired for “not having a positive attitude.”

Tesla is denying the claims, saying that they did investigate the incidents, and fired three workers as a result. The company went so far as to post a statement called “Hotbed of Misinformation” on its website on Wednesday, saying that the company is “absolutely against any form of discrimination, harassment, or unfair treatment of any kind.”

In May, Musk sent an email to all employees telling them that should never “allow someone to feel excluded, uncomfortable or unfairly treated.” However, he also said that workers should “be thick-skinned.”

Vaughn’s lawyer, Lawrence Organ, who also sued Tesla on behalf of three black Tesla workers last month, responded that “The law doesn’t require you to have a thick skin. When you have a diverse workforce, you need to take steps to make sure everyone feels welcome in that workforce.”

Tesla is also facing lawsuits claiming that the company discriminates against gay and older workers, and last month, the United Auto Workers (UAW) union filed a complaint to the federal labor board, saying that Tesla had fired workers for supporting unionization.

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Harvard digs into how several women broke the glass ceiling

(BUSINESS NEWS) At an increasing pace, the glass ceiling is being shattered, but what did it ACTUALLY take for individual women to do just that?

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More than ever, women are breaking the glass ceiling in businesses. However, progress is still very slow, with the number of women CEOs of Fortune 500 companies only increasing little by little each year.

The Rockefeller Foundations’ 100×25 initiative hopes to have 100 female CEOs of Fortune 1000 companies by 2025. To this end, they’ve given a grant to Korn Ferry, a recruiting firm, to find “research-based tools and strategies” for launching more women into executive positions.

Korn Ferry teamed up with Harvard Business Review researchers to interview and assess 57 female CEOs to find out the plot points and personality traits led to their business success. From these observations, they’ve made some crucial recommendations for how companies can get more women into top positions. Here’s what they discovered.

First of all, the study found that women had to work harder and longer to get to the top than men. They held more positions, worked for more companies, and were an average of four years older than their male counterparts.

Secondly, the study also found that female CEOs were motivated by different factors than male CEOs. They were less interested in status and rewards than they were in collaboration and in participating in something that would contribute positively to company culture or to the community as a whole.

The study also identified four common characteristics of female CEOs: courage, risk-taking, resilience, and managing ambiguity. Breaking the glass ceiling in and of itself required women to face fears, take on challenges, and stay in the fight even when discouraged.

Despite these powerful personality traits, female CEOs were found to be more humble than male CEOs. They spent less time promoting themselves and were more likely to be thankful for their coworkers and supporters, and to give credit to others for their successes or their company’s successes. Female CEOs saw themselves as a part of a team and understood that no single person was responsible for defining the company or making it successful.

The study discovered that very few female CEOs had envisioned themselves making it that far. Only five grew up dreaming of being a CEO, and two-thirds said that they didn’t even think about being a CEO until a mentor or boss encouraged them.

Lastly, the study found that female CEOs had strong backgrounds in STEM, as well as business, finance, and economics. None of the CEOs started their careers in human resources, a department that is often heavily staffed by women.

From these findings, the researchers made several suggestions to strengthen the “pipeline” of women into top positions. This included identifying women with potential earlier and giving them more opportunities and guidance, including mentors and sponsors. It also suggested describing leadership roles in terms that resonate with women by showing how the role will give them a chance to add value to the business and do something positive in the world.

Finally, the researchers warned to beware of the “glass cliff,” wherein women are only given leadership opportunities when the company is in crisis or when there is a high chance of failure. Instead, companies are encouraged to give women a chance when the brand is doing well, or if you must put them in a high-risk position, help them bounce back so that it doesn’t ruin their career.

Read more on the study at Harvard Business Review.

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