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Cards Against Humanity has no reason NOT to crowdfund a giant hole #theotherside

(EDITORIAL) Cards Against Humanity crowdfunded the digging of a giant, pointless hole. And while many criticize the brand, I applaud them.

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Other side of the story

My colleague, C.L. Brenton, has written a fantastic article about the Holiday Hole, Cards Against Humanity’s latest annual satirical take on the American ethos of buying and giving.

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The psyche of the American public

For the uninitiated, it’s not as if this is the first time that the CAH team has made a point of being contrarian at Black Friday time. Last year, they collected over $71,000 from their customers for literally nothing in return.

What did the CAH team do with the money then? They divvied it up amongst themselves, with some team members making donations to charity, but otherwise funding purchases for themselves ranging from a divorce to a suit of armor. This year, they’ve topped that amount, and as of the time of this writing, have crested to nearly $100,000 and climbing. In return?

A literal hole, to be sure, but a metaphorical gold mine of insight into the psyche of the human condition in America.

While the CAH team makes it clear on the Holiday Hole website that this is just a hole, with no grander aspirations, I politely disagree. And it’s this disagreement with them that’s at the core of my counterpoint to C.L’s article.

Just because one claims that something is or is not art does not make it so. Art lies in the beholder’s eye, and this growing void is certainly artistic. In some ways, the Holiday Hole is like the magician’s illusion; what’s visible (or invisible depending on your perspective) isn’t always the trick at all. An ordinary hole certainly isn’t.

We imbue it with meaning — even at its creators’ protestations not to do so — because we know that it has greater meaning than what it is.

An eloquent statement

Whereas my colleague says it’s an irresponsible gimmick riffing on American greed, I think it’s an eloquent statement.

The majority of donors have donated small amounts in the $2-$5 range (the five largest donors appear to be websites using CAH as a form of cross-promotion), making this performance art accessible in both meaning and price point for the common man.

We buy, and buy, and buy, and the hole grows larger. Isn’t it the same for us?

We routinely see news stories of assault and injury of stampeding shoppers during Black Friday, and yet we’re not phased. We continue doing what doesn’t satisfy. To paraphrase Chuck Palahniuk, we’re spending this next month buying things we don’t need with money we don’t have for people who’d rather have something different.

What are people going to remember more in fifteen years? That sweater that’s now out of fashion, worn, and too small, or the gift of your time that you gave them doing something together? When I think of loved ones, family and friends alike, that are no longer in my life, the gifts that they gave me that I remember the most intensely aren’t usually tangible ones. They’re gifts of time and love, of a word or deed administered directly at the correct time.

Buying into the statement

So if a few thousand people want to donate small amounts to make a statement on the fact that all the gifts in the world make them feel incomplete, so be it. If they want to make a statement about how this season and its wanton commercialism make them feel inauthentic or flat, let them have that opportunity.

What started as a hole for comedic relief isn’t any longer for them, even if they don’t or can’t articulate that. The Holiday Hole is their small form of therapy, administered in a collective dose.

But certainly the money collected could have been used in a better fashion, people will say. What about the environment, what about the poor, what about the sick, the needy? These are all valid questions, but miss the point entirely.

The funds CAH is collecting for this project come solely from us. Why aren’t we doing responsible things with our money to help these causes more? Remember that the majority of donations have been in small amounts. Many of us are doing things to help our community and fellow man. Is it CAH’s responsibility to not have a forum that some deem wasteful?

Your money is your responsibility

It’s a bit naïve to expect a board game maker to be the keeper of your moral compass. I’ve long posited that if every church, synagogue, mosque, social club, and civic group did daily what they profess to believe all year, we’d have no children in need of adoption, and a lot fewer hungry, homeless, and harried among us.

Our neighbor is not the responsibility of Cards Against Humanity; they’re ours.

And we shouldn’t expect any company, especially one who lives with their tongue as firmly planted in their cheek as CAH does, to do the things that are ours to do.

#TheOtherSide

Roger is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and holds two Master's degrees, one in Education Leadership and another in Leadership Studies. In his spare time away from researching leadership retention and communication styles, he loves to watch baseball, especially the Red Sox!

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Patagonia quintupled Black Friday profits this year, it all went to charity - The American Genius

  2. Steve Temkin

    December 1, 2016 at 12:03 am

    You get it.
    One of the more intelligent tweets responding to cricism of the whole is the growing entitlement people seem to have loudly judging the actions of others based on their own intentions.

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Opinion Editorials

How strong leaders use times of crises to improve their company’s future

(EDITORIAL) We’re months into the COVID-19 crisis, and some leaders are still fumbling through it, while others are quietly safeguarding their company’s future.

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Anthony J. Algmin is the Founder and CEO of Algmin Data Leadership, a company helping business and technology leaders transform their future with data, and author of a new book on data leadership. We asked for his insights on how a strong leader can see their teams, their companies, their people through this global pandemic (and other crises in the future). The following are his own words:

Managers sometimes forget that the people we lead have lives outside of the office. This is true always, but is amplified when a crisis like COVID-19 occurs. We need to remember that our job is to serve our teams, to help them be as aligned and productive as possible in the short and long terms.

Crises are exactly when we need to think about what they might be going through, and realize that the partnership we have with our employees is more than a transaction. If we’ve ever asked our people to make sacrifices, like working over a weekend without extra pay, we should be thinking first about how we can support them through the tough times. When we do right by people when they really need it, they will run through walls again for our organizations when things return to normal.

Let them know it’s okay to breathe and talk about it. In a situation like COVID-19 where everything is disrupted and people are now adjusting to things like working from home, it is naturally going to be difficult and frustrating.

The best advice is to encourage people to turn off the TV and stop frequently checking the news websites. As fast as news is happening, it will not make a difference in what we can control ourselves. Right now most of us know what our day will look like, and nothing that comes out in the news is going to materially change it. If we avoid the noisy inputs, we’ll be much better able to focus and get our brains to stop spinning on things we can’t control.

And this may be the only time I would advocate for more meetings. If you don’t have at least a daily standup with your team, you should. And encourage everyone to have a video-enabled setup if at all possible. We may not be able to be in the same room, but the sense of engagement with video is much greater than audio-only calls.

We also risk spiraling if we think too much about how our companies are struggling, or if our teams cannot achieve what our organizations need to be successful. It’s like the difference in sports between practice and the big game. Normal times are when we game plan, we strategize, and work on our fundamentals. Crises are the time to focus and leave it all on the field.

That said, do not fail to observe and note what works well and where you struggle. If you had problems with data quality or inefficient processes before the crisis, you are not fixing them now. Pull out the duct tape and find a way through it. But later, when the crisis subsides, learn from the experience and get better for next time.

Find a hobby. Anything you can do to clear your head and separate work from the other considerations in your life. We may feel like the weight of the world is on our shoulders, and without a pressure release we will not be able to sustain this level of stress and remain as productive as our teams, businesses, and families need us.

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Opinion Editorials

Declutter your quarantine workspace (and brain)

(EDITORIAL) Can’t focus? Decluttering your workspace can help you increase productivity, save money, and reduce stress.

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It’s safe to say that we’ve all been spending a lot more time in our homes these last few months. This leads us to fixate on the things we didn’t have time for before – like a loose doorknob or an un-alphabetized bookshelf.

The same goes for our workspaces. Many of us have had to designate a spot at home to use for work purposes. For those of you who still need to remain on-site, you’ve likely been too busy to focus on your surroundings.

Cleaning and organizing your workspace every so often is important, regardless of the state of the world, and with so much out of our control right now, this is one of the few things we can control.

Whether you’re working from a home office or an on-site office, take some time for quarantine decluttering. According to The Washington Post, decluttering can increase your productivity, lower stress, and save money (I don’t know about you, but just reading those three things makes me feel better already).

Clutter can cause us to feel overwhelmed and make us feel a bit frazzled. Having an office space filled with piles of paper containing irrelevant memos from five years ago or 50 different types of pens, has got to go – recycle that mess and reduce your stress. The same goes with clearing files from your computer; everything will run faster.

Speaking of running faster, decluttering and creating a cleaner workspace will also help you be more efficient and productive. Build this habit by starting small: try tidying up a bit at the end of every workday, setting yourself up for a ready-to-roll morning.

Cleaning also helps you take stock of stuff that you have so that you don’t end up buying more of it. Create a designated spot for your tools and supplies so that they’re more visible – this way, you’ll always know what you have and what needs to be replenished. This will help you stop buying more of the same product that you already have and save you money.

So, if you’ve been looking to improve your focus and clearing a little bit of that ‘quarantine brain’, start by getting your workspace in order. You’ll be amazed at how good it feels to declutter and be “out with the old”; you may even be inspired to do the same for your whole house. Regardless, doing this consistently will create a positive shift in your life, increasing productivity, reducing stress, and saving you money.

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Opinion Editorials

How to ask your manager for better work equipment

(EDITORIAL) Old computer slowing you down? Does it make a simple job harder? Here’s how to make a case to your manager for new equipment to improve your productivity.

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better equipment, better work

What is an employee to do when the work equipment bites.

Let’s be frank, working on old, crappy computers with inefficient applications can make the easiest tasks a chore. Yet, what do you do? You know you need better equipment to do your job efficiently, but how to ask the boss without looking like a whiner who wants to blow the department budget.

In her “Ask A Manager” column, Alison Green says an employee should ask for better equipment if it is needed. For example, the employee in her column has to attend meetings, but has no laptop and has to take a ton of notes and then transcribe them. Green says, it’s important to make the case for the benefits of having newer or updated equipment.

The key is showing a ROI. If you know a specific computer would be a decent upgrade, give your supervisor the specific model and cost, along with the expected outcomes.

In addition, it may be worth talking to someone from the IT department to see what options might be available – if you’re in a larger company.

IT professionals who commented on Green’s column made a few suggestions. Often because organizations have contracts with specific computer companies or suppliers, talking with IT about what is needed to get the job done and what options are available might make it easier to ask a manager, by saying, “I need a new computer and IT says there are a few options. Here are my three preferences.” A boss is more likely to be receptive and discuss options.

If the budget doesn’t allow for brand new equipment, there might be the option to upgrade the RAM, for example. In a “Workplace” discussion on StackExchange.com an employee explained the boss thinks if you keep a computer clean – no added applications – and maintained it will perform for years. Respondents said, it’s important to make clear the cost-benefit of purchasing updated equipment. Completing a ROI analysis to show how much more efficiently with the work be done may also be useful. Also, explaining to a boss how much might be saved in repair costs could also help an employee get the point across.

Managers may want to take note because, according to results of a Gallup survey, when employees are asked to meet a goal but not given the necessary equipment, credibility is lost.

Gallup says that workgroups that have the most effectively managed materials and equipment tend to have better customer engagement, higher productivity, better safety records and employees that are less likely to jump ship than their peers.

And, no surprise, if a boss presents equipment and says: “Here’s what you get. Deal with it,” employees are less likely to be engaged and pleased than those employees who have a supervisor who provides some improvements and goes to bat to get better equipment when needed.

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