Connect with us

Business Entrepreneur

Worried about your reputation during your job search?

(BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR) You feel like your past may be haunting you as you are searching for a new job. Wondering how to manage your reputation? Let’s talk about it.

Published

on

Woman in interview with concerned expression, perhaps considering her reputation.

We hear all the time about what a small world it really is and that many industries or career paths are close-knit where “everyone knows everyone.” Some may have also been called incestuous. Many recruiters know a lot of people (that’s their job!) and also require references so that they can speak with some of your former colleagues if seriously considering making you an offer. Have you had experiences where you worry if a future employer finds out about it, it may ruin your reputation? You fear that no future hiring manager will want you on their team if they hear about some of your mistakes (aka learning experiences)?

Here’s a fairly extreme example from this Reddit post:

“My reputation is ruined. What do I do?

I have struggled with crippling opiate addiction for the past ten years, resulting in being fired from a number of positions that could have led to successful careers. My reputation is absolutely destroyed, and I’m feeling quite hopeless about ever finding another good job. I have since decided to get clean, and have over a month. But I’m still unemployed, with a terrible reputation, and I don’t know what to do. I have a few good references from previous bosses who saw my true potential, but plenty of bad ones as well. What should I do to rebuild my reputation? In my future job search, should I mention my history of addiction or be vague about it? Should I try to go back to school? Should I volunteer? Or should I just give up and accept a miserable dead end job, or just off myself? Is there any hope? :’(

Edit: Thank you all for your advice. I never expected to receive so much support. I will continue to work on staying sober. You have all helped me stay positive and I really appreciate that.”

First off, let’s give credit to this person for getting sober (and hoping they continue to have the support to stay on that path – and especially support if they relapse). We are all human and it definitely doesn’t hurt to constantly be reminded of that. There’s lots of well-earned attention on Brené Brown right now who spotlights the need for vulnerability and being your authentic self. Her work is based in research and it’s inspiring and uplifting.

Like most things in life, there has to be a balance in your vulnerability as it relates to job searching. People that are looking to hire us do want to get to know us, but there are some things that they may not need to know right away as they evaluate us for a position. Or things they may never need to know about. There is a balance in sharing things that are too personal as it relates to your professional pursuits.

You may expect that this article suggests that this person be totally honest. Well, it’s not that kind of article. There’s a time and a place for divulging your deepest secrets, and the interview room may not be one of them.

It is important to be your authentic self, but you have to identify what is your professional authentic self. When we are job searching and interviewing, we put on our best and have to be buttoned up and polished.

As we grow and learn in our careers, there may be a variety of challenges that we feel can possibly tarnish our reputation (not just limited to addiction mentioned above):

  • Bad relationship with a manager
  • Toxic work environment where stress got the best of us
  • Harassment that was not addressed by HR
  • Financial blunders as it relates to personal or professional budgets
  • It just wasn’t the right fit – whatever that means

Here are some thoughts if you worry like our Reddit contributor that your reputation may be tarnished beyond repair:

  1. Is it time to explore a new industry – where the connections are fresh and they won’t know about why you left so many previous positions? If so, you may have to do some Career Exploration on your transferrable skills and how those can take you in a new direction. Or even new city. The good news is, doors are opening with remote work in our current situation so maybe you can find a new pool of contacts or companies hiring.
  2. Would this be the right time to take what you have learned and help others? Is there a certification or volunteer project that would help you help others that have dealt with your issue? This may help you feel redeemed for why you had to go through that experience.
  3. Utilize LinkedIn to build your network with your advocates or make a simple journal entry of who you worked with in the past that was able to see your potential. These would be great choices for references.
  4. Seek a chat with a friend or even licensed therapist to discuss your situation and forgive yourself. Ultimately if you are holding on to guilt and shame, you won’t allow yourself to move past it and admit that it was full of life lessons. Explore Brené Brown’s work if you need some help in learning more about guilt and shame. They can be very heavy emotions that are also an innate part of being human. We don’t need to eradicate these emotions, we need to acknowledge, accept and MANAGE them.

Often times we are the ones holding ourselves back. It can help to speak with professionals (therapists, recruiters, mentors) to see if the issue is bigger in our head than it really is. And if you need a reminder that we are all human, here it is. Be kind and graceful with yourself.

Erin Wike is a Career Coach & Lecturer at The University of Texas at Austin and owner of Cafe Con Resume. Erin is fueled by dark roast coffee with cream AND sugar, her loving husband, daughter, and two rescue dogs. She is the Co-Founder of Small Business Friends ATX to help fellow entrepreneurs + hosts events for people to live a Life of Yes with Mac & Cheese Productions.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Pingback: The 7 deadly sins of technical interviews - The American Genius

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business Entrepreneur

MediaTech Ventures and The Cannon partner for 6th location in Houston

(ENTREPRENEUR) MediaTech Ventures’ startup incubators and media platforms partner with The Cannon community to launch The Cannon Sports + Media hub.

Published

on

Screengrab of the new MediaTech Ventures and The Cannon workspace in Houston, focusing on sports, media, and entertainment. Photo example of an internal conference area.

The Cannon established an important role in the Houston startup community just a few years ago with their launch in 2017 to create an ecosystem to serve Houston’s entrepreneurs. This month, they’re opening their 6th Houston area location – The Cannon Sports + Media – as a global hub for Sports and Media Technology, along with startup programming from MediaTech Ventures

“From my point of view in Chicago and our work in media technology here, it’s clear that physical infrastructure drives innovation. Meaningful use of space fosters communities, and the resulting concentration of attention from professionals, mentors, and investors, in a sector they know and love, mitigates risks that creators must undertake as they change the world. Space, purposeful space, reduces those risks while connecting people who help one another thrive. We do that here in Chicago, whether in Chicago’s notable startup space, 1871, or in Fort Knox Studios work with 2112 and our MediaTech programming, it’s evident that much of what’s causing Texas to boom is the investment in property that fuels the economy,” says John Zozzaro, President and Founder, MediaTech Ventures.

Today, Houston’s largest entrepreneurial community closes ties with teams in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Austin, bringing MediaTech Ventures’ startup incubators and media platforms to The Cannon community in conjunction with the launch of The Cannon Sports + Media.

Leveraging their growing community of startups, entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, advisors, and investors, The Cannon works to democratize access to the resources innovators need to succeed. This new space has been designed to build a community of innovators focused on revolutionizing sports and media, as well as anyone with the desire to build their business in a space custom-designed and programmed for the sports fanatic.

Started in Austin, TX, MediaTech Ventures works with cities, investors, and developed companies, in media, to fuel entrepreneurship and the rise of the creative class of the economy. Drawn from experiences throughout the United States major media hubs, from Silicon Valley to Los Angeles and New York, they developed a proprietary model for startup incubators that leverages technology to connect the community worldwide, while leading with a curriculum teaching founders with an emphasis in media, the marketing, and the community and content development that enables founders to start a venture more likely to succeed.

The Cannon and MediaTech Ventures have formed a strategic partnership to better serve the media industry and entrepreneurs through MediaTech Ventures’ incubators and technology.

Two story dining or conference area in the workspace.“We’re excited to be teaming up with MediaTech Ventures as a programming partner inThe Cannon Sports + Media space,” Lawson Gow, Founder and President of The Cannon. “The space intends to be a hub for all things sports and media innovation and activity. And MediaTech will be a huge driver of this kind of community in Houston.”

Zozzaro states, “The Cannon’s community and property developments caught our attention immediately as a critical piece of the Texas startup ecosystem and in MediaTech Ventures’ work with the region’s best and brightest founders and incubators. Lawson Gow’s vision of democratizing access to the physical resources that cities and entrepreneurs need fell right in line with our commitment to doing the same in education and capital development. As Texas booms as an epicenter of innovation, Houston’s amazing culture, history in technology, and impact in the arts is unparalleled; aligning with The Cannon’s vision means even more access and resources to creators, and the introduction of The Cannon Community to our startup programs throughout the world.”

“And throughout might be the most notable of what we’re building together. From here in Chicago, I’m working closely with our friends in the 2112 music community to help Italian startups develop into the United States through the Italian Trade Agency. ITA’s other notable location in the United States? Houston, TX, working closely with Mass Challenge and other startup programs passionate about working together for entrepreneurs. And now in MediaTech, we’re bridging the distance even more, between Houston and Austin, Texas and Illinois, throughout the United States, and across the ponds to serve founders better, throughout the world.”

Among the most impactful platforms and ecosystems in Texas’ innovation economy, the close collaboration crosses the chasm between two of the largest and growing cities in the United States while enabling entrepreneurs and investors to access, learn from, and get connected throughout much more of what has the region in the spotlight of the world.

“Let’s do more of this, together, from property to programming that focused on innovation, having a social impact on the world is rather easy – we help people become creators who thrive.”

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

What to consider before you pivot your business model

(BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR) Many businesses have had to pivot during the global pandemic but maybe yours isn’t one of them. Consider these questions first!

Published

on

Two women working at a laptop, no need to pivot business.

When Ross asked Rachel and Chandler (Friends TV show 1994-2004) to move a couch, many of us will never forget his voice inflection and how many times he yelled “PIVOT”! It’s actually a really funny scene and if you’ve never seen it, it might be worth 3.5 minutes of your time. Ross had the best of intentions by starting with a sketch and enlisting help from friends but even that ends up in hilarity as getting his couch in to his apartment doesn’t work and he ends up being offered $4 when he tries to return it (stay for the end of the clip).

The best plans and intentions for your business are often met with what the market and customers demand, where technology grows, and where your ROI is the best. You often know that your original plans will grow and evolve, even in uncertainty and now… a global pandemic.

Many entrepreneurs and small businesses have had to lean on technology to add virtual services (or expand their offerings) to meet our current norm where people are just not out and about like they used to be. Some have seen this work well and others have had to completely re-design their offerings to maintain safe and socially distanced considerations.

The thing is, businesses that have pivoted are being highlighted. But it is also worth looking at what has worked for some businesses that didn’t have to completely shift their strategies in 2020. It is likely that they had to adapt but maybe not a ridiculous Ross-type “pivot” that resulted in a complete failure of the mission.

Harvard Business Review (HBR) shared an incredible article, “You Don’t Have to Pivot in a Crisis” with great insights about what to consider if you think you need to make changes or if you want reassurance you are still on the right track.

HBR shares a powerful thought:

“The lesson here is that when a crisis hits, it pays to resist knee-jerk reactions on how to handle external shocks and ask what is going to work best for your company, based on the particular realities of its business. Ignoring the playbook of rapid cuts plus strategic pivoting can be the smart move… However, staying the course doesn’t mean inaction.”

Here are three thought starters you may want to consider for your business:

  1. What product line or service is best serving your customers right now? Is that one of your strongest and/or could it use some attention?
  2. What product line or service is not quite meeting your needs or customer demands at the moment that had seemingly always worked (not forever! Just right now)? For example, in person gatherings and promotions like events, conferences, trade shows.
  3. Is there something you’ve always wanted to explore? And could now be a great time since people want things more virtually? Examples: Selling branded swag, workbooks, content subscriptions, educational webinars.

These are three simple things but could help point you in the right direction of where to focus your time and energy – at least for now. You may not need a complete re-design or to take a new road, it might be some tweaks and adjustments to hang on to what you’ve worked so hard to build.

Continue Reading

Business Entrepreneur

How to choose the right software for your business

(BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR) What are the best software products for your up-and-coming company? Use these questions to decide which kind is best for you.

Published

on

software products

It’s almost impossible to run a successful modern business without some kind of software to help you stay productive and operate efficiently. There are millions of companies and even more independent developers working hard to produce new software products and services for the businesses of the world, so to say that choosing the right software is intimidating is putting it lightly.

Fortunately, your decisions will become much easier with a handful of decision-making rubrics.

Determining Your Core Needs

First, you need to decide which types of software you really need. For most businesses, these are the most fundamental categories:

  • Proposal software. Customer acquisition starts and ends with effective proposals, which is why you need proposal software that helps you create, send, and track the status of your sales documents.
  • Lead generation and sales. You’ll also want the support of lead generation and sales software, including customer relationship management (CRM) platforms. These help you identify and track prospects throughout the sales process.
  • Marketing and advertising. Marketing and advertising platforms help you plan and implement your campaigns, but even more importantly—they help you track your results.
  • Finance and accounting. With finance and accounting software, you’ll track accounts payable and receivable, and countless variables influencing the financial health of your company.
  • Supply chain and logistics. Certain types of businesses require support when it comes to supply chain management and logistics—and software can help.
  • Productivity and tracking. Some software products, including time trackers and project management platforms, focus on improving productivity and tracking employee actions.
  • Comprehensive analytics. Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software and other “big picture” software products attempt to provide you with comprehensive analytics related to your business’s performance.

Key Factors to Consider

From there, you’ll need to choose a software product in each necessary category—or try to find one that covers all categories simultaneously. When reviewing the thousands (if not millions) of viable options, keep these factors in mind:

    • Core features/functionality. Similar products in a given niche can have radically different sets of features. It’s tempting to go with the most robust product in all cases, but superfluous features and functionality can present their own kind of problem.
    • Integrations. If you use a number of different software products, you’ll need some way to get them to work together. Prioritize products that make it easy to integrate with others—especially ones you’re already using.
    • Intuitiveness/learnability. Software should be intuitive and easy to learn. Not only will this cut down on the amount of training and education you have to provide employees, but it will also reduce the possibilities of platform misuse in the future.
    • Customizability/flexibility. Out-of-the-box software products work well for many customers, but they may not suit your current or future needs precisely. Platforms with greater customizability and flexibility are favorable.
    • Security. If you’re handling sensitive data (and most businesses will be), it’s vital to have a software developed with security in mind. There should be multiple layers of security in place, and ample settings for you to tightly control accessibility.
    • Ongoing developer support. Your chosen software might be impressive today, but how is it going to look in three years? It’s ideal to choose a product that features ongoing developer support, with the potential for more features and better functionality in the near and distant future.
    • Customer support. If you have an issue with the app, will someone be available to help you? Good customer service can elevate the value of otherwise average apps.
    • Price. Finally, you’ll need to consider price. The best apps will often have a price that matches their quality; it’s up to you to decide whether the extra expense is worth it.

Read about each product as you conduct your research, and pay close attention to reviews and testimonials from past customers. Additionally, most software companies are happy to offer free demos and trials, so you can get some firsthand experience before finalizing your decision. Take them up on the offer.

Finding the Balance

It may seem like purchasing or subscribing to new software products will always improve your business fundamentals, but this isn’t always the case. If you become bogged down with too many apps and services, it’s going to make operations more confusing for your staff, decrease consistency, and drain your budget dry at the same time. Instead, try to keep your systems as simplified and straightforward as possible, while still getting all the services you need.

You won’t find or implement the perfect suite of software products for your business overnight. It’s going to take weeks, if not months of research, free trials, and in-house experiments. Remain patient, and don’t be afraid to cut your losses on products that aren’t working the way you originally intended.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Great Partners

The
American Genius
news neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list for news sent straight to your email inbox.

Emerging Stories

Get The American Genius
neatly in your inbox

Subscribe to get business and tech updates, breaking stories, and more!