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How JetBlue earns undying loyalty, and how you can too

(BUSINESS NEWS) Getting people to remember, let alone love a brand is near impossible, but JetBlue shows a promising path forward.

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As customers become increasingly aware of marketing techniques and underlying motives for brands, it becomes more difficult to sell to them. Luckily, there are still a few brands whose techniques you can learn from – and, perhaps surprisingly, one of them is JetBlue.

JetBlue, a major airline, sees their customers as individual people, not just numbers. This “human” aspect of JetBlue’s branding is their most important trait; especially in the airlines industry – a market oversaturated with stale experiences (and peanuts)—it’s crucial to stand out. JetBlue does so by going the extra frequent-flyer mile to make customers feel at home through genuine, human interactions.

Another interesting JetBlue method is categorizing their customer engagement.

There are two different categories of interaction – micro and macro – that refer to small, one-on-one encounters and the big picture, respectively. With an emphasis on making the individual experience as pleasant as possible without losing sight of the forest in the process, JetBlue creates an atmosphere that balances hospitality and efficiency.

One of the most oft-overlooked aspects of customer engagement is that it goes two ways. Responding to customers is objectively important, but it’s an exercise in futility if you aren’t also listening to what they’re saying in the first place. Too often, a customer service team’s first response is to address comments or concerns with damage control in mind; instead, have a dialogue with your customers.

If the interaction doesn’t feel like a conversation, you’re doing it wrong.

JetBlue also has a profoundly healthy response to crises. Where others merely apologize, condescend, and/or brutally drag people off of the airplane when faced with an overbooking or a late departure, JetBlue bends over backward to ensure that their response is both heartfelt and actually useful to those affected.

This is something with which I actually have experience – at one point, JetBlue had to delay one of my flights for several hours, a circumstance to which their response was complimentary drinks and $75 vouchers for future flights. There’s no replacing convenience, but JetBlue did their damnedest, and that’s what I remember about them.

As you approach this year’s customer encounters, remember the two-way approach and avoid falling into the trap of talking rather than listening.

Jack Lloyd has a BA in Creative Writing from Forest Grove's Pacific University; he spends his writing days using his degree to pursue semicolons, freelance writing and editing, oxford commas, and enough coffee to kill a bear. His infatuation with rain is matched only by his dry sense of humor.

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Real Estate Brokerage

Refocusing your team before sales plummet

(REAL ESTATE) It’s that time of year again – holidays distract and procrastination sets in, so here’s how to refocus your team before they are led astray by the calendar.

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This time of year is always difficult in terms of focus. We universally obsess over resolutions and try to be motivated to perfect our lives, but by this week, reality has set in and we still haven’t bought a home in Belize or lost 25 lbs.

If you’re a broker or team manager and are noticing this lethargy or discouraged state with your team, consider stepping up as a leader to get the team to refocus.

As the seasons change, so can our moods. It can be helpful to have quarterly check-ins with your team (either one-on-one or as a group) to discuss current methods, trends, what’s expected on either side, and what can be improved.

This form of open communication helps employees de-stress and may help them recharge and regain motivation. Another communicative form can be found in surveys.

Sending check-in surveys via email to your team to assess their feelings of the workload, the market, and to voice any concerns they have – it can be a great way to open the door for bigger, more important conversations. These surveys can be formatted to be answered anonymously, as well.

Be sure to always be accessible and focused yourself, as you’re setting the barometer of expectation. Allowing for this open communication can let you know what can be improved on your end, which can aid in refocusing.

Another way to bring your team together is by taking everyone out for a quarterly lunch. This helps your agents to bond, while also feeling like their work is being appreciated; therefore, motivating them to keep on producing well.

At the end of the day, you can’t be everyone’s friend, soo, if you’re observing behavior that seems to be unproductive or unfocused, don’t be afraid to speak frankly. Sometimes all it takes is for that behavior to be acknowledged to convince someone to step up their game.

Remember – each team and each manager is different. The attempt to get everyone on the same page and to continuously make strides as a team can take trial and error, but it’s something to always be cognizant of to avoid issues in the future and keep sales on track.

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Real Estate Brokerage

Financial tool indie brokers can use to act more like the mega brokerages

(FINANCE) Indie brokers are often more focused on marketing than operations, but there are tools available to boost business and act more like the big boys.

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There are so many variables that go into operating an independent brokerage; so much so, that it makes coming up with the brokerage model look like the easy part.

One of the variables that takes (often the most) priority is money. You need to know what you’re spending versus what you’re making and how that adds up (pun intended).

Luckily, there are people out there laser focused on making sure that your business is properly tracking cash flow. One such business is flowpilot.

“flowpilot is the easiest way for businesses to plan and manage their cash flow actively. Cash flow planning has never been this easy!” said Founder and CEO, Bernd Thöne. “Simply upload your accounting data and get an overview of your current and forecasted cashflow. Recognize risks and optimization potentials early as they arise and get tips how to eliminate them. Make better decisions by easy and quick simulations simply without effort.”

Additionally, flowpilot presents a user’s liquidity in clear diagrams after analyzing the cash flow. It also allows a user to see projections up to five years in the future. Features include: precise liquidity management, sound decisions, and cash flow control liquidity calculation.

With flowpilot, users can achieve full transparency about the liquidity of their company. This way, they always know exactly where they stand and flowpilot can help you to make informed decisions.

The system uses real-time data in combination with AI algorithms to calculate liquidity forecasts and scenarios. With this, users can plan more strategically and create secure forecasts.

For liquidity calculations – flowpilot is serves as a financial advisor that is available at all times – the evaluation of a user’s financial data is handled by the program’s AI system.

Users register for free (a 14-day free trial is currently available), upload their initial bookkeeping, and then receive a monthly historical overview of their company, and the ability to intelligently plan cash flow as users automatically receive an informed liquidity plan for the next 12 months.

Lastly, you can recognize risks early on and switch to optimizing finances with scenarios built into the platform.

The company boasts itself as easy, smart, and fast. With a 14-day free trial, it could very well be worth a try for your brokerage for a competitive advantage in a world where only the mega-brokers financially forecast.

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Real Estate Brokerage

Is there a difference between leadership and management?

(REAL ESTATE) The two terms, leadership and management, are often used interchangeably, but there are substantial differences; let’s explore them.

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Some people use the terms “leader” and “manager” interchangeably, and while there is nothing inherently wrong with this, there is still a debate regarding their similarities or differences.

Is it merely a matter of preference, or are there cut and dry differences that define each term?

Ronald E. Riggio, professor of leadership and organizational psychology at Claremont McKenna College, recently described what he felt to be the difference between the terms, noting the commonality in the distinction of “leadership” versus “management” was that leaders tend to engage in the “higher” functions of running an organization, while managers handle the more mundane tasks.

However, Riggio believes it is only a matter of semantics because successful and effective leaders and managers must do the same things.

They must set the standard for followers and the organization, be willing to motivate and encourage, develop good working relationships with followers, be a positive role model, and motivate their team to achieve goals.

He states that there is a history explaining the difference between the two terms: business schools and “management” departments adopted the term “manager” because the prevailing view was that managers were in charge. They were still seen as “professional workers with critical roles and responsibilities to help the organization succeed, but leadership was mostly not in the everyday vocabulary of management scholars.”

Leadership on the other hand, derived from organizational psychologists and sociologists who were interested in the various roles across all types of groups; so, “leader” became the term to define someone who played a key role in “group decision making and setting direction and tone for the group.

For psychologists, manager was a profession, not a key role in a group.” When their research began to merge with business school settings, they brought the term “leadership” with them, but the terms continued to be used to mean different things.

The short answer is no, the two terms are not the same; simply because leaders and managers need the same skills to productive and respected.

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