Connect with us

Real Estate Technology

Is Clubhouse the next big thing for entrepreneurs? [INTERVIEW]

(REAL ESTATE TECH NEWS) A conversation with social media mogul Dan Flyshman on how you can leverage Clubhouse as an entrepreneur.

Published

on

Man holding half-empty mug in one hand and phone open to Clubhouse for entrepreneurs..

If you’re an entrepreneur, creative, or social media enthusiast, chances are you’ve heard of the new live-audio chat app Clubhouse that’s exploded during quarantine.

I sat down with Dan Fleyshman – a philanthropist, social media mogul, serial entrepreneur, and the co-founder of the online learning platform for entrepreneurs 100 Million Academy – to discuss his thoughts on Clubhouse. Dan has had extreme success on the app, creating popular rooms such as Money, Investing, Side Hustles, and Building Wealth.

For reference, Dan is the youngest founder to take a company public at 19, and has angel invested in 35 companies. He is also the founder of Elevator Studio, which has spent more on Instagram influencer and celebrity posts than any other company in history. Essentially, this guy knows his stuff – and he thinks Clubhouse will be the #1 app of the year.

Anais, author:

Why do you believe Clubhouse is the next big thing in social media? How have you been using it?

Dan:

There are a few reasons for all the hype about Clubhouse.

  1. It’s exclusive. The app is still “invite only” while it’s in their beta testing.
  2. Movie stars, rappers, beauty executives, comedians, and venture capital executives are spending hours in the rooms. So there’s great networking and learning.
  3. It’s easy to consume since it’s audio. You can jump in and out of rooms to listen to, or participate in conversations ranging from social injustice to raising capital for your startup. So I’m excited to see the evolution of Clubhouse in 2021 and beyond.

A:

What advice would you give to rising entrepreneurs and business owners who want to leverage the app?

D:

Leverage Clubhouse for the network effect. It’s a fast way to grow your network. The reason why it’s so powerful is that people like long-form content. The group of people on Clubhouse are naturally intellectually curious. It’s like a live version of networking. You can find the people that you look up to and listen to them live, ask questions, and interact.

A:

What advice would you give to creatives (i.e. writers, videographers, etc. like myself) who want to leverage the app?

D:

Since Clubhouse is strictly audio based, it feels like an interactive podcast. There’s no chatting, messaging, likes, comments or video capabilities, and they may not ever add those features to keep it hyper-focused on the audio. Creatives need to think of the value they provide and the stories they can tell via audio and approach Clubhouse like that.

A:

What are your rooms like? How can my readers get involved with your rooms? What can they learn?

D:

My rooms have frequently been listed as the top rooms on the social media platform. I feature a fascinating group of speakers from all types of business backgrounds ranging from Ecommerce, VC, social media, authors, makeup brands, consumer products, ad agencies, music artists. Etc. A few include Grant Cardone, Gary Vee, Tai Lopez, and Soulja Boy.

A:

That’s all from me! Do you have anything else you’d like to include?

D:

Clubhouse is extremely addicting. The amount of hours that my friends and colleagues are spending on the app is shockingly high. You need to put some rules in place when hosting a room to maintain control.

My thoughts on Clubhouse etiquette:

  • 30 second intros
  • 60 second questions
  • 120 second answers

Fantastic thoughts from Dan Fleyshman – I’ll definitely utilize his advice next time I’m on the app, and I hope you will too.

Anaïs DerSimonian is a writer, filmmaker, and educator interested in media, culture and the arts. She is Clark University Alumni with a degree in Culture Studies and Screen Studies. She has produced various documentary and narrative projects, including a profile on an NGO in Yerevan, Armenia that provides micro-loans to cottage industries and entrepreneurs based in rural regions to help create jobs, self-sufficiency, and to stimulate the post-Soviet economy. She is currently based in Boston. Besides filmmaking, Anaïs enjoys reading good fiction and watching sketch and stand-up comedy.

Real Estate Technology

Your office could benefit from a more open floor plan

(TECHNOLOGY NEWS) Science proves that open floor plans are more conducive to office productivity, but will it work for everyone?

Published

on

open office

If you walk into a tech startup, nine times out of ten you’ll find an open seating/bull-pen style seating. Whereas traditional work environments are divided up into departments with individual offices and cubicles, open office floor plans put all employees in the same room. Studies have shown that cubicles don’t increase productivity. As a matter of fact, people are more productive when they are sitting close together, but can see each other.

Pros of openness

Some of the advantages of an open office floor plan are obvious. These kinds of offices are economical because you can fit more people and more desks in less space, and because it is more efficient to heat, cool, and light one large room than several small rooms.

Open office plans also facilitate communication between managers and their employees, and between departments.

Rather than taking the stairs or hiking down the hall to collaborate with another person, you can simply holler across the room.

Cons of openness

Unfortunately, all of that hollering can sometimes be pretty distracting. A University of Sydney study found that half of workers in open offices say that the most frustrating part of their workplace is the “lack of sound privacy.”

Open offices are not only noisy, but are also less secure, since everyone can overhear one another.

Employees may get peeved if they can’t concentrate because of all the noise around them, or can’t make a phone call without being overheard.

Dr. Who inspired solution

A startup called Framery Acoustics offers a solution.

They create soundproof phone booths and meeting pods designed to complement open office floor plans.

One of the founders, who previously worked in an open office, complained that his boss talked too loudly on his cellphone. His boss replied, “Well, get me a phone booth.” Thus, Framery Acoustics was born.

Simple solutions

Framery Acoustics is just one company that offers a product suited to appease open office dissenters. Framery Acoustics isn’t ready to give up on openness and neither should you. So, when it comes time to return to your office (if you haven’t already), look for ways to make your office more flexible. Whether it is by providing a quiet capsule for private meetings and phone calls or just having a designated section for meeting, the solution is out there.

Compromising allows you to reap the benefits of an open office plan, while still ensuring that you and your officemates have privacy and quiet when it is needed.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Technology

3D printed homes are now gaining traction outside of the US and China

(TECHNOLOGY) Other countries are now using 3d printing to build homes to underscore their infrastructure. This shows the viability of the technology!

Published

on

3D printing

Recently, we reported that Lennar was using 3D printing to build homes in Austin. In 2014, the BBC reported that China was printing up to 10 homes a day at the low cost of $5000 per home. This trend is making strides in the real estate market, even though there’s still a long way to go. In a move that should give the industry confidence in 3D printing, Indonesia’s Public Works and Public Housing (PUPR) Ministry announced that they are using concrete 3D printing to build homes in rural areas. Eventually, plans are in the works to construct schools.

Using 3D printing to build an infrastructure

Indonesia is the world’s fourth most populous country. As with most countries, housing expenses are climbing in both urban and rural areas. According to Habitat for Humanity, 11.3% of the population lives below the poverty line. For comparison, in September, the U.S. Census Bureau released information that the U.S poverty rate increased to 11.4%, one percentage point over the same time in 2020. Affordable housing is a problem in Indonesia.

“This technology really helps us, so we can build faster, more accurately, and with precision,’ explains Kusumastuti, Indonesia’s Director General of Human Settlements.” The PUPR reports that 3D printing reduces waste and improves construction quality. Considering that up to 70% of housing is built by individuals, not private developers or the government, using 3D printing under the PUPR Ministry is an upgrade in a country that deals with many types of economic disasters, due to its climate.

3D printing’s potential for real estate

As 3D printing is used in more construction projects, not only in the U.S. and China, it’s hoped that the real estate industry embraces the technology. Indonesia isn’t the only country that is trying out 3D printing. 14Trees constructed a school in Malawi using this method already, with the project taking around 18 hours. The company is undertaking more projects in Africa using this technology and more companies are building houses using 3D printing in the United States. It will be exciting to watch how this plays out in the various markets.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Technology

Why everyone and their mother own spy machines (aka smart speakers)

(REAL ESTATE TECHNOLOGY) Regardless of privacy issues with them, what does information about smart speakers, ownership, and usage tell us about future trends?

Published

on

smart speakers scare me

I don’t trust smart speakers, but even I can (begrudgingly) admit why they might be convenient. With just a simple wake word, I would be able to do anything from inquire about the weather or turn down my own music from across the room. And the thing is, plenty of people have bought into this sort of sales pitch. In fact, the worldwide revenue of smart speakers more than doubled between 2017 and 2018. And it’s projected that by 2022, the total revenue from smart speakers will reach almost $30 billion.

With over 25% of adults in the United States owning at least one smart speaker, it’s worth figuring out how we’re using this new tech…and how it could be used against us.

First things first: Despite the horror stories we hear about voice-command shopping – like when a pet parrot figured out how to make purchases on Alexa – people aren’t really using their smart speakers to buy things. In fact, in the list of top ten uses for a smart speaker, making a purchase is at the bottom.

Before you breathe a sigh of relief, though, it’s worth knowing where advertisements might crop up in more subtle places.

Sure, people aren’t using their smart speakers to make many purchases, but they’re still using the speakers for other things – primarily asking questions and getting updates on things like weather and traffic. And I get it, why scroll through the internet looking for an answer that Alexa might be able to pull up for you instantly?

That said, it also provides marketers with a great opportunity to advertise to you in a way that feels conversational. Imagine asking about a wait time for a popular restaurant. If the wait is too long, it creates the perfect opportunity for Alexa to suggest UberEats as an alternative (promotion paid for by UberEats, of course).

Don’t get me wrong, this is already happening when you search Google on your phone or computer. Search for a tire company, for instance, and the competitors are sure to appear in your results. But as more and more consumers start turning their attention to smart speakers, it’s worth being aware that they won’t be the only ones.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Partners

Get The Daily Intel
in your inbox

Subscribe and get news and EXCLUSIVE content to your email inbox!

Still Trending

Get The American Genius
in your inbox

subscribe and get news and exclusive content to your email inbox