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NAR Report: Realtor trends across demographics reveal interesting consistencies

(REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATIONS) The latest report from the National Association of Realtors digs into all kinds of demographics to reveal what brought folks into the field.

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Realtors across demographics looking at data on laptop with papers scattered across desk.

Data makes the world go round. Money does as well, but that isn’t the main point today. Data also comes in many different forms. Points of connection between two seemingly different things can pull together planets (seriously, that’s how gravity functions). Understanding how those things come together is how you can access the world around you in new and interesting ways. From that train of thought, then, knowing your demographics in business can give you insight into a vast realm of possibilities.

Starting in 2017 the National Association of Realtors, America’s largest trade association with 1.4 million members, did a deep dive into their members. They took a look at not only their financial accomplishments but their genders, orientations, races, and even personality traits. Some of their other questionnaires seem to even delve into personal life decisions. The resulting inferences create an intriguing picture across demographics.

So, are you a Gemini, who can split their personality in two? Maybe you’re a Taurus whose stubborn streak makes a glacier seem fast when it comes to changing your mind. An essential piece of someone, their personality. Knowing the personality attributes that can help someone be successful in a job is exceedingly beneficial. You can plan out a path ahead of time before jumping into something without knowing if it’ll work out. Through their surveys, NAR discovered that 62% of residential realtors chose their own career path. The vast majority of them proclaim that being self-motivated is a must to be successful. Other skills such as people skills, communication, and problem-solving actually rank lower while still being needed. Think about that for a moment. You need to be self-motivated to go out and do this job, but all of these successful people basically confirm that “It is mandatory to self-motivate”. Without this skill, you will not thrive.

NAR also did an analysis on how people got interested in real-estate in the first place. These numbers definitely reflect a corresponding link with the personality analysis. Less than 25% of people who answered the survey were brought into real-estate by someone else. This reveals yet again that self-motivated people are the ones who succeed across demographics.

But what they found is that the main draws of the job were also common. Being your own boss helps a majority in the commercial groups. Controlling your own workday with flexible hours was what pulled people into the more residential real estate. Both of these factors again lend towards a driven individual with a strong work ethic.

Interestingly, a lot of variation was found between demographics when it came to income comparisons between races. According to the NAR vice president Jessica Lautz “income may be lower as the typical home price in a neighborhood is lower, for other they may work only part-time and others may be new to the profession and have no ownership in the firm.” The associated numbers involved reveal that White/Caucasian members have the highest median gross personal income and then subsequently we have Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic/Latino, and Black/African-American.

There was also a correlation between the White/Caucasian group and the Black/African-Americans that showed that the former also used real-estate sales as their main or only source of income. Whereas the latter had the highest percentage of people who only used it as a part-time occupation. Having a second job to bring up their overall income. Racial lines also seem to be divided by different types of real-estate. Hispanic/Latino and White/Caucasian were much more likely to be in the suburbs. Asian/Pacific Islander seem to focus in small towns or rural areas. Black/African-American members showed their greatest areas as urban or city sites.

An interesting mound of data was the statistics around LGBTQ+ people that came of this. The information showed that these members were focused in the urban or city areas at almost 50% more than their heterosexual counterparts. These members also spoke highly of some extra skills needed to succeed in this career. Sales and marketing acumen were something that was rated very high on their lists, surpassed only by superior communication and problem-solving skills. This group also surpassed their counterparts in both median number of residential transactions (4-5) and sales volume ($1.6 million – $1.3 million).

A lot of the different aspects of these surveys creates a picture of the type of person who would do well as a realtor. If someone is a self-starting, determined, and an excellent communicator then they’d have a spectacular start. They would have to put in effort for marketing and build a network but it’s a start.

Robert Raney is a geoscientist whose been writing and painting for years to get his creative fix in. While working on his thesis in theoretical planetary physics he was also creating fantastical worlds on paper for fun. He's an at home Texan Houstonite who currently works slinging drinks at a local LGBTQ+ bar in the gayborhood, when not fielding oil & gas jobs that have taken him around the world.

National Association of Realtors

The more communicative you are, the more you’re apt to earn

Communication is key in any relationship, but even more so when it’s the Realtor/Client relationship. Here’s why.

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realtor earnings communicative

In our fast-paced, technology-driven world, Realtors need to be able to engage clients quickly and in a way that allows them to be both personable and professional. Celeste Starchild, Vice President of Move and General Manager at ListHub, gives a bit of insight on how Realtors can tap into the online market more efficiently.

One of the first thing Starchild suggests is maximizing your online presence with search engine optimization or SEO; effectively using SEO will boost targeted advertising to reach consumers when they are most likely to be ready to buy or sell a home.

She states, “search engine marketing drives high quality and high volume leads. If you have the budget, you can pay for the right to have your name and business visible to practically all consumers looking for an agent in a specific location.”

Consumers want immediate responses

This is especially important given the majority of consumers in today’s market are “digital natives.” These “digital natives” are millennials or Gen X-ers who have been around technology so long, they can’t remember a time when the Internet wasn’t at their disposal. Due to this, they tend to go online to do research because they are not familiar with doing business in-person. They also expect an immediate response, as they are used to texting and email, not phone calls and letters.

Starchild states, “consumers want immediate responses from their friends and family via email and texting. Realtors risk missing an opportunity with this demographic if they aren’t responding in a timely, informative, and personable manner.” This includes areas such as social media.

Have you notices Facebook actual lists a response time on business pages now? They do. Most businesses strive to answer messages within an hour, or risk losing business.

Don’t shoot yourself in the foot

Facebook can be an extremely successful and cost-effective marketing tactic for Realtors by using predictive advertising. With this, you can target scenarios such as job relocation, marriage, child birth, and divorce, as purchase drivers and your ad will appear alongside a potential buyer’s Facebook page. This is one of the most powerful and effective ways to reach consumers, according to Starchild, as you are reaching out to them at the critical moment of decision.

Practically every interested buyer or seller will search online for information about a Realtor and read reviews about them before contacting them. This is another area Starchild suggests you examine: “It doesn’t matter where on a search list a Realtor shows up if they don’t have an updated profile with a professional headshot, listed contact information, and a few client recommendations. Failing to do [this] will ultimately lead to missed business;” and no one wants that to happen. So, take a few moments and ensure your contact information is updated and readily available as a search result so you do not miss a potential client.

Improve earnings by being communicative

Once a client messages you, you should aim to respond in the first five minutes, even if your response is automated with a promise to follow-up quickly. As long as you’re reaching out, you can increase your contact rates exponentially.

“Consumers are looking for facts and they want them now. How you respond and interact with them influences their decision on whether or not they’re your client forever, or they’re on to the next one,” says Starchild.

No one wants to miss business, simply because they forgot to respond. Automate responses, use social media, and update your Realtor profile and you’ll be on your way to maximizing your contact rates and client satisfaction.

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Real Estate Associations

NAR Board approves major MLS rule changes to take effect in January

The NAR Board has approved new MLS rules to improve transparency for consumers, all set to take effect in just a few weeks.

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realtor new MLS rules

To improve transparency in a time where forces are pushing to muddy waters, the National Association of Realtors (NAR) announced today that proposed changes to its guidance for local Multiple Listing Service (MLS) broker marketplaces have been approved by a Board of Directors vote.

The changes seek to “ensure disclosure of compensation offered to buyer agents, ensure listings are not excluded from search results based on the amount of compensation offered to buyer agents, and reinforce that local real estate agents do not represent brokerage services as free,” according to a NAR statement.

The following changes are set to take effect Jan. 1, 2022 (per NAR):

  • (1) Reinforce that local marketplace participants do not represent brokerage services as free. While Realtors® always have been required to advertise their services accurately and truthfully, this change creates a bright line rule on the use of the word “free” that is easy to follow and enforce.
  • (2) Ensure disclosure of compensation offered to buyer agents. The change bolsters transparency and Realtors®’ existing duties and practices to talk with their clients about what services they provide and how they are compensated.
  • (3) Ensure listings aren’t excluded from search results based on the amount of compensation offered to buyer agents. This changes wording to reiterate Realtors®’ existing duty to inform clients about all relevant properties meeting their criteria.

“Grounded in our commitment to act in the best interests of buyers and sellers, we regularly review and update our guidance for local broker marketplaces to continue to advance efficient, equitable and transparent practices,” said NAR President Charlie Oppler.

“These latest changes more explicitly state what is already the spirit and intent of the NAR Code of Ethics and local broker marketplace guidance regarding consumer transparency and broker participation,” Oppler noted.

Brokers we spoke with for this story unanimously agreed that this rule update simply codifies what was already what they believe to be the modern practice of real estate.

He added, “This is another example of NAR constantly evolving to ensure pro-consumer, pro-competitive marketplaces for buyers and sellers, and brokers. NAR is proud to be affiliated with the hundreds of local broker marketplaces around the country and will continue to tirelessly pursue changes that improve the real estate experience for all Americans.”

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Real Estate Associations

You know there’s a national real estate mentorship program, right?

(REAL ESTATE) It’s been a long time coming, but the call for mentorship in real estate has been realized thanks to the new NAR program. Here’s how to sign up.

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Mentor speaking with his mentee over mentorship video.

A mentor can help you grow and develop your knowledge and skills. Unfortunately, in the real estate industry, “being thrown into the deep end”, without proper mentoring, has become the norm. For years, we’ve said this shouldn’t be the case and those Realtors should be mentored so they can be set up for success. Now, the National Association of Realtors® has finally heard our cry for mentorship.

The NAR has a mentorship program that is “designed to help budding professionals in underserved areas thrive in a real estate career”. Named NAR Spire, the program will match mentees from “historically marginalized communities” with seasoned Realtors.

Those in the program will not just be exposed to the day-to-day business operations, but will also receive insights into marketing, appraisal, IT, and financing aspects of real estate. Along with that, they will be given educational opportunities, be able to attend business-related events, have one-on-one mentorship meetings, and have access to an online platform designed specifically for the program.

“NAR Spire is a groundbreaking new initiative designed and developed to drive inclusivity in the real estate industry,” said NAR CEO Bob Goldberg.

“We’ve reached beyond NAR’s walls to collaborate with partners across a number of industries,” Goldberg adds, “and we’re confident this program will help Realtors® enhance their reputation as invested, engaged and integral members of every U.S. community.”

You can join the program by completing an application form to become either a Mentor or Mentee.

After you’ve submitted your form, a program coordinator will evaluate your information to conduct a matching process. Your educational and professional background, experience, time availability, and location will all be taken into account to make a match.

When a match has been made, the Program Coordinator will provide you with your mentor/mentee contact details and make an introduction. Then, you will fill out an agreement, review guidelines, and complete an action plan.

Afterward, it’s up to the mentor and mentee to start the mentoring process.

According to the NAR website, the mentorship experience provides opportunities for both the mentor and the mentee, and I think we can agree that is true. For mentors, they will have the opportunity to coach the new kids to help them reach their full potential and also learn a thing or two in the process. For mentees, well, they will finally get the guidance they need to learn the ropes and thrive in their careers.

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