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Op/Ed

Privacy issues and real estate listing photos (+ how to get yours removed)

(REAL ESTATE) Listing photos are the currency of real estate sales, but understanding the process can be complex.

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real estate listing photos

In the real estate world, photos sell. Everyone loves a complete set of listing photos…

Buyers love previewing homes on their phones and computers.

Sellers generally want their home to have maximum exposure to as many websites, agents, and potential buyers as possible.

The loss of privacy is often overlooked in the excitement of the moment. I live and work in California. Your state may vary slightly, but if you are a public recording state like CA, this advice should transfer.

Sellers, Buyers & Listing Photos

We’ll discuss the following:

  • How do real estate listing photos get to the internet?
  • What a seller agrees to about photos and online photos.
  • Disclosures about online privacy/photos that a buyer may see.
  • What a buyer/seller typically agree to in their purchase contract.
  • What rules govern photo and info display on websites?
  • What happens to listing pictures when the home is sold?
  • What can you do?

How do real estate listing photos get to the Internet?

Typically:

  1. The seller signs a listing agreement.
  2. The broker uploads photos into the local MLS (Multiple Listing Service) and makes a representation about ownership and licensing/distribution that is authorized by the listing agreement or other document. Sellers can opt out of this but typically don’t.
  3. The local MLS distributes the listing compilation (photos, info) to brokers. Sellers can opt out of this but typically don’t.
  4. The local MLS distributes the listing compilation to third-party companies such as Zillow or syndication companies that, in turn, redistribute the listings to a wide variety of real estate websites. Other feeds go to individual agents or some brokerage websites at a fee. Sellers can opt out of this but typically don’t.
  5. The local MLS is obligated to give a copy of the listing to realtor.com per a separate agreement.

What a seller agrees to about photos and online photos

Most listings in California use the CAR residential listing agreement, which clearly explains what the seller is agreeing to, who owns the images, and what control a broker has (none) after those images are entered into the MLS and syndicated to third party sites. Here are relevant excerpts:

CAR Residential Listing Agreement

PHOTOGRAPHS AND INTERNET ADVERTISING:
A. Seller agrees (or if checked___, does not agree) that Broker may photograph or otherwise electronically capture images of the exterior and interior of the Property (“Images”) for static and/or virtual tours of the Property by buyers and others for use on Broker’s website, the MLS, and other marketing materials and sites. Seller acknowledges that once Images are placed on the Internet neither Broker nor Seller has control over who can view such Images and what use viewers may make of the Images, or how long such Images may remain available on the Internet. Seller further assigns any rights in all Images to the Broker and agrees that such Images are the property of Broker and that Broker may use such Images for advertising, including post sale and for Broker’s business in the future.

B. Seller acknowledges that prospective buyers and/or other persons coming onto the property may take photographs, videos or other images of the property. Seller understands that Broker does not have the ability to control or block the taking and use of Images by any such persons….Seller acknowledges that unauthorized persons may take images who do not have access to or have not read any limiting instruction in the MLS or who take images regardless of any limiting instruction in the MLS. Once Images are taken and/or put into electronic display on the Internet or otherwise, neither Broker nor Seller has control over who views such Images nor what use viewers may make of the Images.

Disclosures about online privacy/photos that a buyer may see:

CA Statewide Buyer and Seller Advisory (approx 13,650 words over 14 pages of dense text):
Page 13 of 14:
…Buyer and Seller are advised that Broker has no control over how long the information or photos concerning the Property will be available on the Internet or through social media, and Broker will not be responsible for removing any such content from the internet or MLS. Brokers do not have expertise in this area.

CA Buyer Representation Agreement – Exclusive (rarely used in SF)
INTERNET ADVERTISING; INTERNET BLOGS; SOCIAL MEDIA: Buyer acknowledges and agrees that: (i) properties presented to them may have been marketed through a “virtual tour” on the Internet, permitting potential buyers to view properties over the Internet, or that the properties may have been the subject of comments or opinions of value by others on Internet blogs or other social media sites; (ii) neither the service provider(s) nor Broker has control over who will obtain access to such services or what action such persons might take; and (iii) Broker has no control over how long the information concerning the properties will be available on the Internet or social media sites.

CA Buyer Representation Agreement – Non-Exclusive
INTERNET ADVERTISING: Buyer acknowledges and agrees that: (i) properties presented to them may have been marketed through a “virtual tour” or the Internet, permitting potential buyers to view properties over the Internet; (ii) neither the service provider nor Broker has control over who will obtain access to the service or what action such persons might take; and (iii) Broker has no control over how long the information concerning the properties will be available on the Internet.

I could not find any language in the CA Buyer Representation Agreement – Non-Exclusive/Not for Compensation with regard to this issue.

What a buyer/seller typically agree to in a Purchase Contract

Most purchase agreements used in California have language saying the buyer and seller expressly agree that the sale and associated information are to be reported to the MLS.

The Parties hereby grant to the San Francisco Association of REALTORS® Multiple Listing Service (“MLS”) the right to publish and disseminate the sales price, terms of this Contract and other information about the Property and authorize their respective Brokers/Agents to submit such information under the applicable MLS rules.
— San Francisco Purchase Agreement

Brokers are authorized to report to the MLS a pending sale and, upon Close Of Escrow, the sales price and other terms of this transaction shall be provided to the MLS to be published and disseminated to persons and entities authorized to use the information on terms approved by the MLS.
— CAR Residential Purchase Agreement

Whose rules govern online photo display?

Brokers/Agents
Three entities make the rules about what agents and brokers can display on their websites:

  1. The local association (in our case, the San Francisco Association of Realtors/SFAR)
  2. The state association (California Association of Realtors/CAR)
  3. National Association of Realtors (NAR).
  4. Most state associations have adopted NAR’s model MLS rules in order to obtain liability insurance through NAR, and local associations adopt their own rules in line with the state and national model rules in order to also have access to the same liability coverage. To mix several metaphors: That’s the carrot that keeps this herd of real estate cats vaguely glued together.

    Local SFAR rules stipulate that:

    SFAR MLS Rules/Regulations 2018
    …By submitting photographs to the MLS, the Participant and/or Subscriber represents and warrants that it either owns the right to reproduce and display these photographs or has procured such rights from the appropriate party, and has the authority to grant and hereby grants the MLS and the other Participants and Subscribers the right to reproduce and display the photographs in accordance with these rules and regulations.

    Zillow, Trulia & other 3rd party websites
    The use of photos by private companies is governed by their licensing agreement with the entity that provided the photos, as well as any other site-specific privacy or user policies. In general, if a third-party website — such as Zillow, Yahoo, realtor.com, Facebook, or any other non-broker/agent website with real estate listings — is getting a legitimate data-feed, they are also getting a perpetual license to display/use the images. As I said, privacy policies vary widely, so I’m not going to post them all here.

    What happens to the listing when the sale closes?

    The real estate industry spent years resisting the publishing of sales data on the internet, but in 2018 NAR updated its policy to prevent state or local associations from blocking brokers or agents from displaying historical sales data going back to the arbitrarily chosen date of January 1, 2012*. When a sale closes, an agent typically has 1- 3 days to report the closed sale to the MLS with sales price and other terms of the sale.

    *California is a public records state for real estate transactions. Some states (Texas, for example) record real estate transactions privately, and information about the sale is not available in the public record. The NAR policy says that if you are in a public records state, you can’t be prevented from displaying sold data, but in states like Texas where real estate sales aren’t public record, the NAR policy doesn’t apply and sold data can continue to be withheld from display.

    And that’s what happens. When the sale closes, the pictures all remain and the listing is updated with the sales price. The entire property used to be removed from the IDX feed, but now it no longer typically is. Same thing with third-party websites.

    What can you do?

    There’s no official place to go for requesting removal of photos. Usually, the brokers you worked with or the local MLS where your property is listed are the best places to start.

    After the sale has closed:

    • Contact the local MLS and request removal of the public display of your home’s interior photos.
    • Ask the MLS if this change will remove them from the IDX/broker feed or if additional calls are necessary?
    • Contact brokerages/agents that have your sold data displayed and make the same request.
    • Contact 3rd party sites like Zillow, Trulia, etc. and claim the home as an owner and then request removal of photos.
    • Want exterior photos removed? Be sure to request that. You can also have your home’s exterior obscured on google maps.

    The painful tip we don’t want to share, but… before the sale has closed:

    I hate to share this tip because it devalues the MLS for all participants using it for comparable sales valuations – but here’s the trick… When in contract, but before the close of escrow ask the listing agent to remove all of the photos with the exception of an exterior (generally required by MLS rules).

    Again, removing interior photos (which do the best job of portraying overall condition/layout) dramatically hurts the value of the MLS. However, it vastly reduces the number of sites you need to contact after closing to remove property photos.

    In summary

    Rare is the house listed for sale that no longer is immediately published all over the internet. Sellers grant their brokers the right to take and publish photos. Brokers publish those photos primarily in their local MLS, which then distributes them to a number of brokerage and agent websites, as well as 3rd party real estate websites.

    The public display of sold data means interior home photos are likely to linger on the internet forever unless an owner actively requests their removal.

    Removal of photos is subject to a variety of policies, but most companies tend to cooperate. If you’d like your photos removed, the best place to start is with the brokers involved in your transaction prior to the close of the purchase.

Matt Fuller brings decades of experience and industry leadership as co-founder of San Francisco real estate brokerage Jackson Fuller Real Estate. Matt is a Past President of the San Francisco Association of Realtors. He currently serves as a Director for the California Association of Realtors. He currently co-hosts the San Francisco real estate podcast Escrow Out Loud. A recognized SF real estate expert, Matt has made numerous media appearances and published in a variety of media outlets. He’s a father, husband, dog-lover, and crazy exercise enthusiast. When he’s not at work you’re likely to find him at the gym or with his family.

Op/Ed

Get off of Facebook and sell my friggin’ house already

(EDITORIAL) We all have to be online, but how do you balance dominating the web with farting around on Facebook?

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home buyer facebook

I’m not anti-social media

Yes, that was a baited title and No, no one said that to me.  But they could if I don’t do my job as a listing agent first and foremost.  I am NOT an anti-social media advocate (not at all, I <3 love social media!) but I AM a consumer advocate and if you are an agent your consumers are buyers and sellers, period.

Do you want to know what the awesome sauce of being a top listing agent is? It is servicing a listing as you would want your own home to be serviced.  Think about that for a minute.  If you had a home for sale, what would you expect the listing agent to do?  You may not have even thought about it in this perspective before, but it can be a pretty handy tool to up your game and build client loyalty and provide your consumers, your clients, with the type of service they RAVE about.

I would EXPECT my Super Star Ace Listing Agent to:

1) Dominate the Internet with my listing, including maps, pictures, details, school info etc.  I’d want to be able to Google my address and find my listing in many different locations.

2) I would want to be able to reach my listing agent quickly, in my preferred communications manner (text, email, phone).

3) I would expect detailed updates each time they showed the house (feedback) and monthly updates on all the marketing my listing agent has done that month for my property (and I’d like to know what is working and where the traffic is coming from, technically and geographically).

4) I for SURE want to be assured that when someone wants to see my listing, that the listing agent makes it very easy and accommodating for it to be shown.

5) If I saw my agent on Facebook, Twitter or other social media, I’d be cool with it as LONG as they were doing the above first.  If they haven’t had time to update me, show my listing or give me feedback, they sure as Heck don’t have time to be on any social media site.

6) I’d EXPECT my listing to be on my listing agent’s blog or website (I would not take kindly to the idea that my agent’s blog or website is NOT the place for my listing to be, so if you, Blogging Purist Agent, don’t have a main site where your listings are highlighted, I’d rethink that strategy, my main clients are my listing clients, not blog visitors who don’t want to see my listings, this is a REAL ESTATE BLOG and I SELL MY LISTINGS).

7) I would NOT want to know that my listing agent has a bad reputation for spamming anyone.

8) I would expect my listing agent to be fully abreast of my competition not only when they list the property, but monthly so that we  can make decisions together regarding price changes based on informed knowledge.

9) I would want to know that my listing, regardless if it’s lower than the rest of my agent’s inventory, is getting the same treatment that all of the others do.  If they wanted my business, then respect it. Don’t just take my listing to build your inventory book and treat me like a red-headed step child.

10) Finally, I’d want to know that my agent is knowledgeable, approachable, professional and dedicated to selling my listing as quickly as possible for the highest the market will bear.

Have you done your job?

If you, fellow agents, have some disgruntled listing clients or clients who don’t want to reduce their price even when the market indicates it should, look at the above and see if you have done your job as you would have expected it to be done for your own property.  Where did you fall short?  What can you rectify now?  Build your business around the desired consumer experience and expectation and you can’t go wrong.

You might do all of things, you might do more, and they might seem elementary.  If so, Great, go have a blast on Facebook and bring in more great business from great clients, but if not, get your own house in order before looking for more houses to sell. No pun intended.

PS: I have seen agents (and even myself in moments of weakness) not provide the service above, and when I look back at my less-than-perfect self, I just shake my head, pull up my bootstraps and get back to being that agent that I want to be.  Where I most often fall down is simply letting the clients know what is going on.

I somehow forget that they don’t KNOW their single property site has been viewed 5,000 times, or that there is a foreclosure in the neighborhood that wasn’t there before, etc.  I need to always keep them as informed on their listing as I am so they can feel secure and up-to-date.  That is exactly what I would want to be if it were my home on the market….

This editorial was originally published in 2010 on The American Genius by Janie Coffey.

#giterdone

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Op/Ed

Is Instagram really anything more than a narcissism engine?

(EDITORIAL) The more Instagram followers we have, the more likes we average, and the more we want. Let’s discuss.

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Social media platforms are, I would postulate, some of the most significant contributors to our rapidly-developing culture of narcissism. This is especially true of Instagram, which is basically the social media version of a self-promoting picture book.

Full disclosure: I love Instagram. Between all the dumb crap that my cats do, and a weird recent obsession with trying to start up a fitness channel, I have plenty of self-validating content to post around the clock — and the subsequent “likes”, follows, and comments make me feel like I, a single participant in one of the largest social media platforms around, matter. That’s what’s so great about Instagram.

Unfortunately, that’s also what’s so dangerous about the seemingly innocuous platform. Everything we post — and I truly challenge you to find a counterexample here — is from a validation-seeking standpoint. While you can certainly make a case from this perspective for almost any social media contender, I believe that Instagram is the worst offender here.

Here’s why: rather than “asking” others to validate our words (and maybe an occasional meme or selfie) a la Facebook, Instagram is sheer self-promotion.

We use our bodies, our pets, our food, our surroundings, our belongings — basically any attractive asset available — to fulfill our insatiable need for validation.

The more followers we have, the more likes we average, the more we want.

Don’t get me wrong, this makes IG completely invaluable from a business standpoint. We can use our accumulated follower bases to influence and control our brands, which – while still self-serving — can have positive effects outside of our own personal growth.

Unfortunately, these factors also make Instagram downright devastating to that same personal growth.

Now, I’m certainly not going to stop using (and abusing) Instagram for my own personal gain — and neither should you.

I’m also not going to pretend for a second that anything I say or do on IG is for a purpose other than validating the superficial qualities of my own existence, be they trivial or otherwise.

And, should you agree with me, I would encourage you to do the same.

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Op/Ed

Morning rituals of highly successful people – do you have one?

(EDITORIAL) From start to finish, the daily life of each successful person is very much dictated by their family and job. But there are definitely some patterns that we can all incorporate into our own morning rituals to achieve higher success and order.

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realtor working

Fleximize took a look at the morning habits of 26 of the country’s most successful individuals to include the President of the United States Barrack Obama, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Steve Jobs and even Oprah Winfrey.

What was discovered? Well, each of the men and women on their chart start their day early with time blocked out for exercise and meditation, breakfast and family. In short, things that are important!

Someone, somewhere coined it best: “If it has to happen, then it has to happen first!” Everyone has an “it.” Anyone who has managed to find professional success is surely embracing this philosophy. The first hour(s) of the day are used doing whatever is one’s top-priority activity. And no sooner do you start you risk the priorities of everyone else creeping in.

Interestingly enough, exercising in the morning is one of the group’s top priorities. It’s been said many times that exercise helps keep productivity and energy levels up and better prepares us for the everyday challenge of achieving all we can.

From start to finish, the daily life of each successful person is very much dictated by their family and job. But there are definitely some patterns that we can all incorporate into our own lives to achieve higher success and order.

An Insider article found that “the most productive people understand how important the first meal of the day is in determining their energy levels for the rest of the day. Most stick to the same light, daily breakfast because it works, it’s healthy for them and they know how the meal will make their mind and body feel.”

The Fleximize chart demonstrates that successful people consider the quiet hours of the morning an ideal time to focus on any number of things: important work projects, checking email, meditation. And what’s more, spending time on it at the beginning of the day ensures that it gets complete attention before others chime in.

So check the chart and find someone you can relate to.

BI points out that planning the day, week, or month ahead is a crucial time management tool designed to keep you on track when you’re in the thick of it. Using the mornings to do big-picture thinking helps you prioritize and set the trajectory of the day!

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