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LinkedIn’s 50 top companies people want to work for

(BUSINESS NEWS) LinkedIn recently published a list of the 50 top companies everyone wants to work for.

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LinkedIn’s list

LinkedIn has released its annual Top Companies list, detailing the 50 companies LinkedIn users seem to have the most interest in working for.

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Here, however, I’ve detailed the Top 10 companies from that list, for your reading enjoyment.

10.) Comcast NBCUniversal

a.k.a. Probably Your ISP
Number of global employees: 160,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 1,424
Headquarters: Philadelphia, PA

Not only is the cable TV and Internet juggernaut reportedly planning a Netflix rival, but with its 25 million Internet subscribers, and the high-quality programming coming out of NBCUniversal, it may actually stand a chance in the On-Demand streaming market. With its annual Comcast Cares community volunteering program, as well as its recent commitment to hire 10,000 military veterans by the end of 2017, Comcast is doing its best to live up to CEO Brian Roberts’ goal in making the company culture “the one thing [he’s] got to get right”.

9.) The Walt Disney Company

a.k.a. Time Warner’s Rival
Number of global employees: 195,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 163
Headquarters: Burbank, CA

Everyone knows the House of Mouse, but did you know that Disney also owns networks such as ABC and ESPN? If one is looking for a job in entertainment, there are certainly worse places one could go. Not only is the Walt Disney Company home to entertainment powerhouses such as Walt Disney Studios, Pixar, Marvel, and LucasFilm, but there are also branches of the company such as the Disney Cruise Line, Disney Parks and Resorts, the Disney Store, and more. Plus, all Disney employees get free passes to Disney theme parks for themselves and their dependents. Free passes to the “Happiest Place on Earth” seems like a pretty sweet deal to me.

8.) Time Warner

a.k.a. the Walt Disney Company’s Rival
Number of global employees: 25,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 309
Headquarters: New York City, NY

Parent company to iconic entertainment companies such as Warner Bros., Turner and HBO, those seeking to join an entertainment empire certainly applied this past year. This is likely in part due to the company’s upcoming acquisition by AT&T. Combining numerous high-value entertainment assets with AT&T’s 50 million customers? I think it’s safe to say the company’s future seems bright. Perks include things such as film and TV screenings at the office, as well as a Fit Nation program- promoting employee participation in various exercise activities.

7.) Apple

a.k.a. the Apparent Influence for Every Technology Company in Modern Media
Number of global employees: 110,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 391
Headquarters: Cupertino, CA

The upcoming completion of Apple’s new campus, Apple Park, may have piqued some extra interest in the tech giant. Makers of the Mac computers, and inventors of the iPhone, Apple’s legendary legion of loyal fans are well-known. However, what you may not have known is that the company offers employee stock grants to all employees. Apple’s retail stores turn over just barely more than 10% of employees each year, in comparison to the 80% turnover rate for the rest of the retail industry. Huh. Maybe those overly enthusiastic folks working at the Apple Store really do enjoy their jobs.

6.) Tesla, Inc.

a.k.a. Rockets, Bullet Trains, and (Autonomous) Automobiles
Number of global employees: 30,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 2,168
Headquarters: Palo Alto, CA

Tesla, pulling in at number 6 on the list, has recently taken over as the largest U.S.-based automaker, surpassing both Ford and General Motors. Therefore, it makes total sense that folks looking to work on cars would pick as Tesla as their prime work destination. Those interested in working on sending humans to Mars might, as well. Or those interested in working on a bullet train, running from San Francisco to Los Angeles. The same could also be said for those interested working on autonomous vehicles. And, with the company’s recent acquisition of SolarCity, there are likely even more avenues to explore. With Elon Musk’s recent announcement that Tesla’s Autopilot feature should be capable of a fully autonomous trip from L.A. to New York by the end of the year, it seems awfully likely the number of applications that Tesla receives will only continue to increase for the foreseeable future.

5.) Uber

a.k.a. Your Saturday Night Ride Home, a.k.a. Bad Press Magnates
Number of global employees: 12,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 3,445
Headquarters: San Francisco, CA

Uber may not be getting the best press lately, but it certainly hasn’t seemed to have stopped folks from applying there. It couldn’t hurt that Uber is the highest-valued private technology company, currently being valued at $69 billion. It’s possible also that the company’s Uberversity program – a 3-day program attended by new hires, or nUbers (because apparently, Uber loves their puns) wherein they get to meet directly with the company’s leadership team- is way more exciting than it sounds.

4.) Salesforce

a.k.a. That Company That Basically Provides the Backbone to Your Business
Number of global employees: 25,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 724
Headquarters: San Francisco, CA

Salesforce, the company known for its cloud-based business software and its massive annual San Francisco-based conventions comes it at number 4 on the list. Aside from every company previously listed using its platforms, Salesforce is also likely raking in the applications due to its highly touted inclusive company culture. Not only did the company famously invite Buddhist monks to consult on the design of its headquarters, but it also is well-known for its regular employee pay audits to ensure equal compensation is given regardless of race, gender, sexual identity, ethnicity, etc. Adding to its reputation as a socially conscious company, all employees are offered an additional 8 days of paid time off per year to contribute to causes they find important.

3.) Facebook

a.k.a. Socializing for the 21st Century
Number of global employees: 17,000
Current LinkedIn Job Opportunities: 1,152
Headquarters: Menlo Park, CA

Facebook ranks at number 3 on the list, as with a website reaching nearly 1.9 billion active monthly users, that’s kind of what you would expect. Aside from its social media focus, the company’s acquisitions of various messaging platforms, audio companies, and virtual/augmented reality technologies allows for a variety of career options and opportunities. CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s vision for the company is quoted as being to “build the new social infrastructure to create the world we want for generations to come”. Regardless of your opinion on Mark Zuckerberg and/or Facebook, you’ve got to admit that’s a pretty grand vision.

2.) Amazon

a.k.a. That Site Where You Do Most of Your Online Shopping
Number of global employees: 341,100
Current LinkedIn job opportunities: 17,016
Headquarters: Seattle, WA

E-tail (is that still a phrase?) giant Amazon also made it onto this year’s list of top companies. Aside from being the most recognizable online retailer, it also happens to be the parent company of ventures such Audible, Goodreads, and Comixology (building on its online bookstore beginnings). Not only have the number of subscribers to its Prime service grown by the “tens of millions”, but the company is also reportedly planning to add over 100,000 full-time, fully benefited jobs over the next 18 months. The company is a great place to work for dog-lovers as well, as not only are employees’ canine pals welcome at their Seattle headquarters, but there is dog park complete with dog treats on site! After all, it would be egregious if they did not cater to their canid employees as well.

1.) Alphabet Inc.

a.k.a. Google
Number of global employees: 72,000
Current LinkedIn job opportunities: 1,135
Headquarters: Mountain View, CA

Is it really all that surprising that Alphabet, Inc. is at the top of the list? Pretty much anything you’re interested in doing, they seem to have a hand in. Not only are they the owners of the uber (see number 5) super-popular Android platform, the creators of the ultra-useful Chrome web browser, ChromeOS, key players in the Autonomous Vehicle Wars, and, oh yeah, essentially Masters of the InterWebs, they also have a pretty awesome company culture. Not to mention, of course, the fact that the company is set to be using 100% renewable energy for all its operations by the end of the year. Yay, environmentalism!

(Also, it should be mentioned that those Google bikes are pretty rad.)

The rest of the list

If you are interested in reading up on all 50, their list is available here.

#LinkedInTop50

Andrew Clausen is a Staff Writer at The American Genius and when he's not deep diving into technology and business news for you, he is a poet, enjoys rock climbing, monster movies, and spending time with his notoriously naughty cat.

Business News

Hobby Lobby increases minimum wage, but how much is just to save face?

(BUSINESS NEWS) Are their efforts to raise their minimum wage to $17/hour sincere, or more about saving face after bungling pandemic concerns?

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Hobby Lobby storefront

The arts-and-crafts chain Hobby Lobby announced this week that they will be raising their minimum full-time wage to $17/hour starting October 1st. This decision makes them the latest big retailer to raise wages during the pandemic (Target raised their minimum wage to $15/hour about three months ago, and Walmart and Amazon have temporarily raised wages). The current minimum wage for Hobby Lobby employees is $15/hour, which was implemented in 2014.

While a $17 minimum wage is a big statement for the company (even a $15 minimum wage cannot be agreed upon on the federal level) – and it is no doubt a coveted wage for the majority of the working class – it’s difficult to not see this move as an attempt to regain public support of the company.

When the pandemic first began, Hobby Lobby – with more than 900 stores and 43,000 employees nationwide – refused to close their stores despite being deemed a nonessential business (subsequently, a Dallas judge accused the company of endangering public health).

In April, Hobby Lobby furloughed almost all store employees and the majority of corporate and distribution employees without notice. They also ended emergency leave pay and suspended the use of company-provided paid time off benefits for employees during the furloughs – a decision that was widely criticized by the public, although the company claims the reason for this was so that employees would be able to take full advantage of government handouts during their furlough.

However, the furloughs are not Hobby Lobby’s first moment under fire. The Oklahoma-based Christian company won a 2014 Supreme Court case – the same year they initially raised their minimum wage – that granted them the right to deny their female employees insurance coverage for contraceptives.

Also, Hobby Lobby settled a federal complaint in 2017 that accused them of purchasing upwards of 5,000 looted ancient Iraqi artifacts, smuggled through the United Arab Emirates and Israel – which is simultaneously strange, exploitative, and highly controversial.

Why does this all matter? While raising their minimum wage to $17 should be regarded as a step in the right direction regarding the overall treatment of employees (and, hopefully, $17 becomes the new standard), Hobby Lobby is not without reason to seek favorable public opinion, especially during a pandemic. Yes, we should be quick to condone the action of increasing minimum wage, but perhaps be a little skeptical when deeming a company “good” or “bad”.

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Business News

RIP office culture: How work from home is destroying the economy

(BUSINESS NEWS) It’s not just your empty office left behind: Work from home is drastically changing cities’ economies in more ways than you think.

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An empty meeting room, unfilled by work from home employees.

It’s been almost six months since the U.S. went into lockdown due to COVID-19 and the CDC’s subsequent safety guidelines were issued – it’s safe to say that it is not business as usual. Everyone from restaurant waitstaff to start-up executives have been affected by the shift to work-from-home. Even as restrictions slowly begin to lift, it seems as though the office workspace – regarded as the vital venue for the U.S. economy – will never truly be the same.

Though economists have been focusing largely on small businesses and start-ups, we are only just beginning to understand the impact that not going back into the white-collar office will have on the economy.

The industries that support white-collar office culture in major cities have become increasingly emaciated. The coffee shops, food trucks, and food delivery companies that catered to the white-collar workforce before, during, and after their workday, are no longer in high demand (Starbucks reported a loss of $2 billion this year, which they attribute to Zoomification). Airlines have also been affected as business travel typically accounts for 60%-70% of all air travel.

Also included are high-end hotels, which accommodate the traveling business class. Pharmacies, florists, and gyms located in business districts have become ghost towns. Office supplies companies, such as Xerox, have suffered. Workwear brands such as J. Crew and Brooks Brothers have filed for bankruptcy, as there is no longer a need to dress for the office.

In Manhattan – arguably the country’s most notorious white-collar business mecca – at least 1,200 restaurants have been permanently lost. It is also is predicted that the one-third of all small businesses will close.

Additionally, the borough is facing twice as many apartment vacancies as this time last year, due to the flight of workers no longer tied to midtown offices. Workers have realized their freedom to seek more affordable and spacious residence outside the city. As companies decentralize from cities and rent prices drop, it isn’t all bad news. There is promise that particular urban white-collar neighborhoods will start to become accessible to the working class once again.

Some companies, like Pinterest and REI, are reporting that their shift to work from home is in fact permanent. The long-term effects of deserted office buildings are yet to make themselves evident. What we do know is that the decline of the white-collar office will force us to reimagine the great American cities – with so much lost due to the coronavirus, what can now be gained?

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Business News

2020 Black Friday shopping may break the mold

(BUSINESS NEWS) Home Depot states their new plan for deals and discounts over two months, in place of a 1-day Black Friday event.

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Men shopping in an empty aisle, Black Friday to come?

Humans change and adapt – that’s just in our nature. Retail stores have struggled to maintain their sales goals for years as more and more people move to ordering online. Online prices still seem to be within customer expectations and often come with free shipping. Additionally, people that may have preferred to shop in an actual brick-and-mortar store have changed their shopping habits dramatically in 2020; it’s hard to social distance and be safe in crowded stores or in small aisles. Black Friday may be next to change.

Amazon and other big box store’s online ordering platforms have simplified getting what you need delivered right to your front door. According to Statista, “Amazon was responsible for 45% of US e-commerce spending in 2019 – a figure which is expected to rise to 47% in 2020.”

Retailers count on the holiday season, specifically Black Friday deals (the day after Thanksgiving), to bring in up to 20% of their annual revenue. It’s hard to just remove that option completely. But considering the times of social distancing, wearing masks in public, and especially avoiding large crowds, the tradition of Black Friday will need to look different this year.

It will also be interesting to see what supply chain disruptions from early 2020 will have the most effect this shopping season. We saw predictions in March that said the United States would see the biggest disruptions in about six months. Black Friday falls right on that timeline.

Home Depot has announced their plans to go ahead and give the deals over a two month span, starting in early November through December (both online and in stores with the possibility of adding some special deals around the actual Black Friday date) to help encourage a more steady stream of shoppers versus so many packing in on the same day.

The home improvement chain has actually seen a great sales year. This is likely due to people working from home and being interested in doing more home projects (and possibly having a bit more time to do them as well). As of May 2020, “The Home Depot®, the world’s largest home improvement retailer, today reported sales of $28.3 billion for the first quarter of fiscal 2020, a 7.1 percent increase from the first quarter of fiscal 2019. Comparable sales for the first quarter of fiscal 2020 were positive 6.4 percent, and comparable sales in the U.S. were positive 7.5 percent.”

Home Depot, along with many other retailers like Walmart, Target, and Best Buy have confirmed that they will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, which may not be new for all of them but has always signaled the kickoff of the holiday shopping season.

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