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2020 NAR Report: Breaking down For Sale by Owner (FSBO) homes

(REAL ESTATE BIG DATA) The 2020 NAR Report analyzes how For Sale By Owner (FSBO) sales have been affected in 2020, and what that could mean going into 2021.

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Home owners browsing online for FSBO home selling

At the beginning of 2020, the housing market started off strong. While there was a nine-week downturn at the onset of the pandemic, sales resumed and have continued an upward trend through the rest of the year, resulting in higher prices (jumping 14.6%). This increased demand has been primarily driven by lower mortgage rates and employees working from home (which in turn means a reassessment of where people want to live, with many opting away from cities given that their personal choice is now more easily obtainable).

It has not been entirely beneficial at all times, however, with sales declining for the first time in six months, due to lower inventory and the aforementioned rising costs. Still, this suggests that the market has continued to flourish.

The National Association of Realtors began tracking various trends for home real estate in 1981 with a total of 59 questions designed to understand the market over a twelve month period from July to June. In doing so, a snapshot of the current landscape was obtained for that year, and this data has since been collected annually. Further, it has grown to include additional considerations, covering a massive 131 questions in the most recent 2020 report.

Of the numerous subjects covered, for sale by owner sales (i.e., without assistance from a realtor) are directly profiled. This FSBO information is collected here, and several insights can be gleaned with regard to this particular selling method.

As this report shows, there are certain circumstances that – when tracked across the entire survey – show positive outcomes. A quick example is that not having a previous relationship with the buyer yields higher selling prices and a smaller percentage of times where the asking price was reduced. Interestingly, data also shows a seller’s starting median income being higher than situations where there was a previous relationship with the buyer.

Let’s take a deeper look into this specific topic.

For Sale By Owner Sales Show Steady Decrease Since Inception
In 1981, FSBO sales accounted for as much as 15%, but this has declined gradually over time, accounting for only 8% in 2020 (though this is up 1% from the previous year). Additional analysis showed that these sales were evenly split between the buyers and sellers having a previous relationship versus not, with the latter as generally more advantageous toward the seller. Sales mostly came from suburban and urban locations (as opposed to recreational and resort territories).

FSBO and Agent Assisted Sales 2003-2020
FSBO and Agent Assisted Sales, by Location

Demographics Breakdown – Median Income
In comparison to agent-assisted sales, FSBO owners differ on a number of data points that are significant. For example, FSBO sellers had a median age of 57, which is just above agent-assisted sellers at 56. Further, their median income is over ten thousand dollars lower ($96,700 vs $108,300), which falls even further if an agent was used later in the process after an initial attempt at a self-sale ($79,000).

Interestingly, there is a correlation between higher median seller income when it comes to selling their home to someone where no previous relationship existed ($107,800 versus $84,200).

Characteristics of FSBO and Agent Assisted Sellers

Types of Homes Sold
The majority are detached single-family homes at 81%; there is a small dip to 78% (down from 82% in 2019) with regard to FSBO sales. The main differences here are that FSBO shows a lower percentage of townhouse sales (6% versus 3%) but an increase overall in mobile/manufactured homes (3% versus 9%).

We also still see differences when a previous relationship is not present – there’s an increase in townhouses and mobile/manufactured homes and a decrease in detached single-family. Otherwise, both groups are comparable.

Type of Home Sold, FSBO and Agent Assisted Sellers

Home Location
FSBO sales tend to skew slightly higher in rural areas compared to agent-assisted transactions, though there is a significant difference in resort/recreational sales for those who do not have a prior relationship.

Location of Home Sold, FSBO and Agent Assisted Sellers

Selling Price
Overall, FSBO sales result in a lower median price than with agents ($217,900 versus $295,000), but there has been an increase in the price over 2019 (rising up from $200,000). It’s worth noting that agents will take a percentage of the sale as commission (around 1%). In situations where an agent was employed after an initial attempt at a direct sale, the owner would receive 98% of the asking price, but usually had to reduce their listing before a deal could be made.

In short, this does seem to suggest that an agent’s knowledge of the market and skillset can benefit a seller.

Selling Price, FSBO and Agent-Assisted Sellers

Factors That Determined Selling Price
When settling on an initial listing, FSBOs who knew their buyers tended to focus on comparables in their area 41% of the time. Other methods trailed behind, such as appraisals (32%), profit needed by seller (29%), online evaluation tools (21%), and covering what was owed (15%). Those who did not know their buyer saw an increase when relying on comparables (56%).

How FSBO Seller Determined Asking Price of Home Sold

Length of Time on Market
One of the most important factors in real estate is the amount of time a home will be on the market until it is sold. In this regard, FSBO sales have a slight edge, with an average duration of two weeks (with agents having a median of three weeks). This is increased when the seller knows the buyer, with an average just under a week, rising by 6 points in 2020 to 52%.

As such, homes sold by FSBO tend to move more quickly, and knowing the buyer beforehand accelerates the process.

Time on Market, FSBO and Agent-Assisted Sellers

Remaining Factors – Urgency, Incentives
Compared to agent-assisted sales, FSBO tended to be less urgent overall, with over half saying they did not need to sell urgently regardless of knowing the buyer (52%) or not (64%). There was also a lower tendency to give incentives to the buyer in these conditions, as all FSBO sales offered nothing 85% of the time.

Seller Urgency, FSBO and Agent-Assisted Sellers
Incentives offered to attract buyers, FSBO and Agent-Assisted Sellers

Reason For Selling as FSBO
A majority of owners chose this route due to not wanting to pay a commission or fee, citing this reason as 41% of the time. Selling to a relative, friend, or neighbor was the next most frequent reason, covering 30% of all FSBO sales.

Regardless of why an owner was selling, there was almost always a large disparity between knowing the buyer versus not. This is most pronounced in situations where the buyer contacted the seller directly – 6% of sales versus 22%.

Most Important Reason for Selling Home as FSBO

Method For Selling
Interestingly, a majority of FSBO sales utilized no active methods for marketing their home at 46%, with a large discrepancy between knowing the buyer (68%) versus not (24%). Selling to a friend, relative, or neighbor occurred 22% of the time, while third party aggregators such as Zillow and Redfin were at 24%. Yard signs covered 25%.

When the buyer was not known, the owner relied much more heavily on third parties, social networking sites (such as Facebook), yard signs, and open houses. This would follow given that more work would need to be done to locate a buyer. We can see from the data that third parties are becoming more and more utilized when there is no prior relationship, which would tie into the real estate market becoming more intertwined with digital methods.

Method Used by FSBO Sellers to Market Home

What did FSBO sellers say?
While 8 in 10 successful FSBO sales reported being very satisfied with the process to sell their home. 53% reported that there was nothing truly difficult or arduous when it came to the selling process, which far outshone other reasons such as preparation, completing paperwork, price adjustments, and attracting buyers.

Most Difficult Task for FSBO Sellers

When they knew the buyer, 16% said they would sell their current home when the time arose, while 45% who didn’t know the buyer reported the same. This would suggest that this method is overall successful and attractive, despite that over a third reported not knowing what process they’d take with their current home.

How FSBO Sellers will sell their current home

Conclusion
Both types of sellers were overwhelmingly satisfied with the process they used to sell their homes, with 81% and 83% responding with “very satisfied.” Despite some of the perceived additional challenges and the foregoing of an experienced realtor, it suggests that FSBO works a large part of the time for owners.

FSBO Sellers Satisfaction Process of Selling Homes

With the advent of third parties and social networking, a greater wealth of knowledge accessible via the internet (looking up comparables, recently sold homes, guidance from other home sellers and realtors, etc.), and a rich inventory of resources available, home owners can conceivably move forward with selling their home directly and still enjoy positive results.

Robert Snodgrass has an English degree from Texas A&M University, and wants you to know that yes, that is actually a thing. And now he's doing something with it! Let us all join in on the experiment together. When he's not web developing at Docusign, he runs distances that routinely harm people and is the kind of giant nerd that says "you know, there's a King of the Hill episode that addresses this exact topic".

Real Estate Big Data

Housing starts stagnate, market conditions are rapidly shifting

Housing starts for April stagnated, marking the second consecutive months of declines, and more renters being left out of this shifting market.

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construction home growth housing starts

Housing starts stagnated in April, down 0.2% from the prior month, according to the U.S. Commerce Department.

The sentiment appears to be that although this marks the second straight month of dips, most are seeing today’s news as a positive, especially as construction of new homes was expected to fall 2.4% in April.

Further, housing starts are up 14.6% from April of last year, driven primarily by multifamily construction.

But it’s worth not getting overly excited, given that permits dipped 3.2% in April which is a forward-looking indicator, so expect starts to continue cooling in a time where we quite need the inventory.

Demand for housing inventory remains high, but the National Association of Home Builders reports today that confidence in the single-family housing market fell dramatically in May, marking the lowest level in two years.

Dr. Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist at the National Association of Realtors said in a statement, “The worst of the housing shortage is ending, but market equilibrium between supply and demand is still some ways off.”

He notes that as mortgage rates increase, builders “are chasing rising rents, with fewer homebuyers and more renters being forced to renew their leases,” noting that even prior to the interest rate increases, rents were rapidly rising and vacancy rates rapidly declining.

Pointing to another market shift, Dr. Yun notes that “Some degree of a return to the office is also fueling back-to-city living where high rises are concentrated.”

That’s a problem.

“Even as home sales look to trend back to pre-pandemic levels after the big surge of the past two years,” concludes Dr. Yun, “inventory will not return to pre-pandemic conditions. That means home prices will get pushed even higher in the upcoming months, albeit modestly, given the supply-demand imbalance.”

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Real Estate Big Data

Home prices jump double digits in majority of American metros [report]

(REAL ESTATE) Housing affordability was already a widespread challenge before current economic pressures were applied, but now home prices are skyrocketing.

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homeownership home prices

As home sales slide and mortgage rates rise, home prices in 70% of 185 measured metros saw a double digit annual increase in Q1, according to the newest data from the National Association of Realtors (NAR), up from 66% in the previous quarter.

The Southern region accounted for 45% of home sales in Q1, and experienced a 20.1% increase in annual home prices (compared to 14.3% just the quarter prior). Home prices in the Midwest jumped 8.5% annually in Q1, while The Northeast rose 6.7%, and the West increased 5.9%.

The median sales price of a single family existing home has now hit an astonishing $368,200.

“Prices throughout the country have surged for the better part of two years, including in the first quarter of 2022,” said NAR Chief Economist, Dr. Lawrence Yun. “Given the extremely low inventory, we’re unlikely to see price declines, but appreciation should slow in the coming months.”

Yun expects supply levels to improve, and for “more pullback in housing demand as mortgage rates take a heavier toll on affordability,” given that “there are no indications that rates will ease anytime soon.”

At first blush, price appreciation sounds lovely to anyone that owns a home, given that it is the largest investment most Americans will ever make.

But regarding today’s report, several homeowners told us that they now feel trapped, and that if they sold their current home, even if they purchased a new house at that same price, they would likely have to downgrade.

Affordability is an ongoing problem weighing down the housing sector. NAR reports that the monthly mortgage payment on a typical existing single-family home with a 20% down payment rose to $1,383 (up $319, or 30%, from one year ago). Families now typically spend 18.7% of their income on mortgage payments (but only spent 14.2% one year ago).

“Declining affordability is always the most problematic to first-time buyers, who have no home to leverage, and it remains challenging for moderate-income potential buyers, as well,” Dr. Yun observed.

Map of how home prices are behaving nationally

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Real Estate Big Data

Office occupancy is on the rise, but its knocking down morale

(BIG DATA) Despite work from home policies still in place and the flexibility some employers are offering, office occupancy is increasing steadily.

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Empty startup office with open floor plan, abandoned while working from home.

As coronavirus numbers dwindle and some officials begin calling for a fourth COVID-19 shot, more and more people previously working at home after being kicked out of shuttered office buildings are returning to the bullpen.

The National Association of Realtors reports that more than 80% of metro areas in the United States have seen an increase in in-person working.

Boston saw the largest office occupancy growth over the past year. Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C. have the most open space.

NAR researcher Scholastica Cororaton says office occupancy is also increasing in areas with a big tech presence. San Jose, San Diego, San Francisco and Seattle lead those areas.

“The rising occupancy in these tech metro areas indicates that tech companies are contributing to the demand for office space,” Cororaton wrote. “Even as nationally, 45% of mathematical and computer workers work from home for at least some part of the time.”

The way companies are returning to work vary and are sparking anger. For instance, Google employees must now be in the office three days a week. On the other hand, Apple begins its return to office plan next week. It starts with employees coming back one day a week which will eventually grow to two days and then three days a week. Apple employees have revolted against the idea and are have threatened to quit.

Many in leadership are pleased with the return to the office to boost productivity and collaboration. However, employees are finding they’re showing up in person to just log in to Zoom again, which has stirred up even more frustration.

On top of the redundancy of work that could be done at home, a study shows only 3% of white-collar employees want to work in the office all week. 86% want to stay home for at least a few days.

Plus, the return to the office drives up costs, with gas prices seeing soaring and inflation at a 40-year-high.

Since the second half of 2021, 30 million square feet of office space has been taken up, however, about 100 million square feet remain.

NAR reports filling that space up again could take through the end of 2024.

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