Connect with us

Real Estate Technology

Throw a smart bulb away, give out your passwords

(TECH NEWS) It turns out that Internet of Things, like smart bulbs in homes, are not secure and give up your info – here are some security tips.

Published

on

smart bulbs

Most of us know that we need to protect our computers from hacking, identity theft, and other security hazards. But now that more and more everyday items in our households – from light bulbs to washing machines to baby monitors – are connected to the internet, we need to make sure that these items are secured as well. Because they’re not.

Unfortunately, Internet of Things (IoT) devices are notoriously unsecure, and a troubling investigation by hacker, Limited Result, reveals that some IoT devices are not only potential targets when connected to your home internet network, but could even pose a security threat after you’ve thrown them in the garbage.

Limited Results investigated several budget smart lightbulbs and found that many of them have no security features protecting the information held on the microchips inside the bulb.

Some lightbulbs could be taken apart, and the chips removed and hacked to reveal unencrypted data, including the Wifi password for the network to which it had formerly been connected.

“Seriously, 90 percent of IoT devices are developed without security in mind. It is just a disaster,” Limited Results told TechCrunch.

There were other safety issues beyond the security of personal data. Limited Results also found that inexpensive smart lightbulbs were so cheaply-made and poorly insulated that they posed a serious risk of electrical fire.

So how can you make sure your IoT devices are secure?

For starters, don’t just go for the cheapest version available. Although there’s no guarantee that the top dollar devices are secure either, be mindful of installing smart devices outside of your home. For example, you may want to sacrifice being able to tell Alexa to turn on your porch lights. Dispose of smart light bulbs carefully, and don’t donate them to second hand stores.

Another option is to create a subnetwork or guest network for your connected devices. And as always, make sure everything is password protected and change your password often. Especially your wifi passwords.

The conveniences of IoT devices need to be weighed against the potential security risks, at least until IoT manufacturers create regulations and standards for security.

Ellen Vessels, a Staff Writer at The American Genius, is respected for their wide range of work, with a focus on generational marketing and business trends. Ellen is also a performance artist when not writing, and has a passion for sustainability, social justice, and the arts.

Real Estate Technology

Emotional reactions may be the best way to gauge your video ads

Political campaigners use AI to detect emotional responses to their ads – and your company can too.

Published

on

ai artificial intelligence

As artificial intelligence technology develops, more and more advanced and specific kinds of data are available to help marketers optimize their campaigns. While it’s easy enough to track whether your audience is watching your ad video all the way through, whether they are reposting it, or clicking on your link, the latest technology may be able to give you even deeper insight into what your audience is thinking and feeling.

This week at the Campaign and Elections Innovation Summit, an exhibition where companies show off the latest technologies for assisting political campaigns, a company called CampaignTester demonstrated its “mobile focus group platform.” This platform gives you more than just the basic data. It uses a viewer’s phone or tablet camera to measure not only engagement – that is, whether or not the person is actually facing the screen with the volume turned up – but also the viewer’s emotional response to each second of the video.

CampaignTester uses an artificial intelligence technology called emotiontrac, which can measure micro movements in a viewer’s face to identify eight emotions: happiness, surprise, sadness, confusion, fear, disgust, anger, as well as simply “neutral.” The app then consolidates emotional and engagement data into a report in the app’s dashboard, showing a graph measuring engagement and emotion throughout each part of the video.

While CampaignTester was presented to political campaigners this week, it would clearly be useful for any kind of marketing campaign. Says COO Bill Lickson, “CampaignTester is not just for the political and advocacy marketing initiatives. We’ve had interest from movie producers, record labels, ad agencies, celebrity influencers and companies from a variety of industries that want to add this unique data to their business intelligence.”

In fact, any company can sign up to use CampaignTester to gather data about your marketing campaigns. In order to use the app, you’ll need to upload videos and determine who will be watching them. Viewers will need to opt-in and agree to “disclosure and privacy policies.” Most companies using CampaignTester will recruit viewers by offering perks such as gift cards.

It’s a great way to gather data from viewers who actually agreed to have their data collected and didn’t get tricked into it by failing to read the fine print. Pricing for using CampaignTester varies by the length of the video and the number of people you’d like to view it.

Without data about viewers’ emotional reactions, an ad campaign could fail without you ever fully understanding why. But if the viewers’ faces reveal that your video has left them confused or angry, you can make changes to improve it.

Short of an in-depth focus group, this may be one of the best ways to measure how people are actually responding to the content of your video-based marketing.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Technology

Cybercrimes are on the rise, but it’s pretty easy to defend yourself (so do it)

(REAL ESTATE TECHNOLOGY) Cybercrimes can cause some serious problems for you and your clients, but there are easy quick ways to insure the safety of any information

Published

on

cybercrimes

Life is full of uncomfortable conversations. From telling your Tinder date it’s just not working out, to calling your parents to say you can’t come home for the holidays, there are plenty of discussions to dread. One unfortunate conversation that’s on the rise, however, involves cybercrimes and real estate transactions. Nobody wants to have to tell a client that their private information – or even payments – have been stolen.

Luckily, there are ways to defend against cybercrimes.

First, however, it’s worth knowing what you’re up against. According to Robert Siciliano, CEO of Safr.Me, there has been a dramatic increase in cybercrimes over the last two years alone. Criminals are growing more organized and skilled, so it’s crucial to ensure your data is secure.

The good news is, securing your information can be easier (and cheaper!) than you expect.

Many crimes have been successfully committed simply because users haven’t taken cybersecurity seriously. Weak passwords, for instance, can make a data breach much more likely. These are passwords like “password” or “abcde.” Not only does Siciliano recommend a stronger password, but also implementing two-step verification, which will require more information to log in.

At the National Association for Realtors Conference and Expo, Siciliano explained, “Hackers say once they own your password, they own the email. Because they can pose as you. This can lead to people stealing your information, stealing your clients’ information and even convincing clients to wire money to their account.”

That’s no bueno for business.

It’s also worth discussing cybersecurity with clients early on. Warn them, for instance, about what to do if they get an email from “you” about wiring money to an account you all haven’t discussed. You might even want to bring up passwords – we can all benefit from stronger passcodes.

Just like talking to your kid about keeping the front door closed is easier than breaking the news that their dog ran out the open door and got hit by a car, having slightly uncomfortable conversations with clients early can save you having the really uncomfortable conversation about accidentally leaking their banking information.

Cybercrimes might be on the rise, but even a few small tweaks can help keep you and your clients safe from digital disaster.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Technology

These password managers protect you and your clients’ info

(TECH NEWS) Identity theft is nothing new, but what are you doing to protect yourself and your business? Have you considered these simple password managers?

Published

on

lastpass password managers

Online safety is often discussed after data breaches, hacking scares, and identity theft, but it shouldn’t take an event of this magnitude to get you thinking about your online safety.

Passwords are used for everything; from email to doorways, banking to business terminals, entering passwords has become so common, we hardly ever give it a second thought, but we should. Every single time you get online, people are lurking, waiting to hijack your accounts and steal not only your money, but your reputation and access to your personal information.

The first thing most people tell you to do when your account seems to be compromised is “change your password.”

In essence, this is meant to foil hackers and re-secure your account, but if your password isn’t “strong,” this option won’t work for long.

“Strong” passwords consist of a random mix of numbers alongside upper and lowercase letters (and oftentimes symbols as well). However, coming up with something that meets this criteria, but is also fairy memorable is a pain for one site, not to mention for the 20-30 sites we regularly access. Before you use the same password on multiple sites (which is a HUGE no-no), consider online password generators.

Online password generators are magical devices that generate one of these complex passwords for you.

You can set the parameters such as length of password, upper/lowercase letters, symbols, numbers, and even ambiguous letters. A few reliable generators you can try:

Once you’ve generated your password, you’re going to have to remember it and every other password you create.

Impossible you say? Well, you’re right. With as many sites as we regularly access, remembering all our passwords is darn near impossible without help. Writing them down in a day planner is fairly common, but not exactly 100 percent secure.

Instead, give password managers a chance. While all online repositories have some vulnerabilities, most modern storage sites are very secure.

Browsers like Firefox, Chrome, and even Internet Explorer offer to store your passwords for you. Sure, it’s convenient, but is it secure? Most tech experts say no.

Sean Cassidy, chief technology officer of Defence Storm, states, “Browser-based password manager extensions should no longer be used because they are fundamentally risky and have the potential to have all of your credentials stolen without your knowledge by a random malicious website you visit or by malicious advertising.”

What do these password managers do exactly?

Traditional password managers live in your computer and act like digital assistants, gatekeepers if you will, your first line of defense standing between your accounts and the hackers looking for access. The manager will fill in your vital information (login and password) when you arrive on a site, meaning, rather than remembering 40 different unique site passwords, you’ll only need to remember the master password for your chosen password manager.

While there are several reliable managers on the market, there are three that have emerged as most popular:

All of these managers have the ability to safely store and recall your passwords and login information. You simply need to remember your single master password to log into the manager site you’ve selected.

Password managers are so heavily encrypted, storing your information is considered safe, but keep in mind everything you do online comes with a risk. I do not believe any site is completely hack-proof, however, a password manager is another line of defense against hacking and with their use of top-level encryption, it makes hacking a little bit harder and that’s exactly what you want.

Regardless of whether you choose to use a password generator or manager (or both), one thing is crystal clear: online data safety is of paramount importance. Keep your data safe, starting with using a strong password and a different strong password for each site.

Keep your personal information safe, and more importantly, safeguard your clients’ data.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Our Parnters

Get The Daily Intel
in your inbox

Subscribe and get news and EXCLUSIVE content to your email inbox!

Still Trending

Get The American Genius
in your inbox

subscribe and get news and exclusive content to your email inbox