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Your entire car’s dashboard could soon be an interactive screen

(TECH NEWS) We just talked about car roofs with display screens, and one company wants to turn the entire dashboard into a screen.

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We’ve mentioned an autonomous car design that places a panoramic screen on the roof; in doing so, we posed the question, “Where else in a car could you possibly put a screen?” – an inquiry to which Byton, an automotive startup, responds with “The dashboard, of course.”

Byton’s “Shared Experience Display” is essentially what it sounds like: a wide, panoramic screen that shows different content based on the people in the car and the angle of viewing. The display focuses on four main categories of information—health, communication, entertainment, and activities—allowing drivers to maintain focus and optimal driving conditions while their passengers enjoy their favorite brands of media.

As cool as the Shared Experience Display is, the screen itself isn’t nearly as impressive as the intent behind it. In order to progress the automotive industry, Byton turned their concerns toward a comfortable user experience and a seamless integration of technology into driver use. Where other companies have added plenty of bells and whistles to their vehicles, Byton has endeavored to use that technology to complement the drive.

Aspects of this complementary nature include things like health monitoring—for example, Byton’s car might push an alert to you when you’re in need of a break—and the ability to request information and updates via an Alexa-based personal assistant. Surprisingly, both of these features are also available in upcoming Toyota vehicles; however, Byton’s software suite compounds on existing models by wrapping theirs in an entertainment-flavored package.

Indeed, passenger and driver comfort and luxury are clearly high priorities for Byton. In addition to the (frankly unnecessary) huge screen in the dashboard, Byton also includes smaller screens on the backs of the front seats, allowing passengers to customize what they see without disturbing the driver. This maximizes on Byton’s notion of creating a safe internal environment for drivers while preventing passenger boredom.

This year’s CES saw some pretty impressive autonomous vehicle breakthroughs, which is why Byton’s innovation and expansion on existing principles is so remarkable. The customer experience is still the most important priority for them, and that priority shows in the design of their vehicle.

Byton’s vehicle is expected to debut in 2020.

Jack Lloyd has a BA in Creative Writing from Forest Grove's Pacific University; he spends his writing days using his degree to pursue semicolons, freelance writing and editing, oxford commas, and enough coffee to kill a bear. His infatuation with rain is matched only by his dry sense of humor.

Real Estate Technology

If your task lists are based on your email inbox, meet Moodo

(TECHNOLOGY NEWS) Moodo is helping people by removing the need to organize their organizers with the invention of their own task manager.

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There are plenty of devices and platforms out there that ensure productivity. However, using all of them at the same time will do just the opposite. That is why one company, Moodo, has found a solution.

They have developed a way to create task lists and schedule events all by starting with email.

Moodo was founded by Grant Watters and Jay Meistrich after they realized just how much time they wasted “organizing their organizational systems.” Even they recognized how many devices and separate tools they were using to keep up with their daily to-do lists.

Ultimately, it made them less productive as more time was spent task switching, tracking down content and translating it to team members than performing the tasks themselves. This led them to create Moodo, an application that deciphers tasks lists directly from your inbox.

Anyone can begin making outlines through Moodo. First, you start with your inbox. Users can sort, prioritize and organize emails based on their content. The tool allows users to make various outlines, where emails are dragged, dropped and saved as tasks.

Outlines can be viewed all together, or can be zoomed in and searched for specific content.

Additionally, users can match up their to-do lists with their calendars. Tasks can easily be placed into calendars to correspond with your schedule. It is a way to ensure that no tasks are overlooked or forgotten because they reside in more than one place.

Moodo is not only a great way to boost individual productivity, but also work ethic among a group. Multiple members on a team can view and edit task lists and calendars in real-time. Everyone can use their individual devices to collaborate. Moodo also works offline. Changes to any content will be synced once you go online again.

The company can ensure users’ privacy because none of the content passes through servers, instead it is stored on Google Drive. People can start using Moodo for free. It is also currently available on all devices.

So why not put your email to good use? With Moodo, everything works better when it works together.

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Real Estate Technology

It’s complicated, but how does one move out of a smart home?

(HOMEOWNERSHIP) We live in a world of the latest, greatest tech gadgets for a smart home, but what happens to them and the information they’ve collected when you’re ready to move?

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One of the attractions to a smart home is customization; you can customize everything from the temperature, to the amount of light in a particular room. Smart homes can accommodate nearly every preference and in most cases, anticipate what you need, but what happens to all this technology, and more importantly, the data this technology has collected, when you decide to move out of your smart home?

Hardwired versus stand-alone
Most smart homes have a stand-alone hub (or central control) that connect your lights, thermostat, sprinklers, and everything else, while some more involved, automated units require panels to be directly wired into the walls. As you can imagine, the wired-in units, are obviously not going to be walking out the door with you quite as easily when you leave, as a stand-alone hub (like Alexa or Google Home). More importantly, however, where is the data going that your thermostat, security cameras, voice-activated controls, and everything else have collected when you leave? How do you lock down those devices and data so the next occupant cannot access your sensitive information?

Locking it down and resetting devices
Your first priority should be to make certain your software is up-to-date and that you are using the latest security and encryption protection that’s compatible with your system. Each aspect of your smart home likely has a “disconnect” or “uninstall” process and you’ll likely need to consult with each one to insure you have a smooth and safe transition to your new home. Even if you’re taking the components of the system with you, you’ll need to reach out to customer support and let them know your new location. If you’re leaving them behind, tech support will likely recommend that you reset it to the factory default, so the next family will be able to connect their system and adjust to their preferences.

Protecting data and IoT
While dealing with the actual devices is important, as an entire connected home can become quite expensive, even more crucial, is ensuring that your data is protected when you move. This brings us back to a topic we have long and frequently discussed: the IoT (Internet of Things) and who in fact owns the information collected from a smart home?

In general, if you own your home, you own the data, although, each app/program/vendor/utility can vary so always, always, always, read the terms and conditions before you click “accept” when you begin using a new program or app. The ToS will likely tell you what the company will do with the data it collects from your devices and you need to protect the ownership of your data. Also, read the privacy policy as some data can be sold to 3rd parties (for massive profit) if you blindly click “accept.”

If you still think it’s no big deal, you might want to read about who will profit from the IoT. Also dig in to who owns what type of data, because let’s face it, you want to know where and how video footage, door lock access codes, and security alarm entries are being stored.

If you take nothing else away from this article, let it be to double-check your encryption setting and your preferred apps’ data storage/sales policies because these are the two most important and proactive steps you can take to prevent your data from falling into the wrong hands, not only when you leave your existing smart home, but also in general while you are using and enjoying your automated technology.

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Real Estate Technology

Drone simulator apps let you try before you buy

(TECH NEWS) Want to boost your Realtor cred with awesome drone photos but not sure you want to put down the cash? This company has an option to let you try it out free of charge!

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drone simulator

Finally. Finally. It’s the article I was born to write. In the following few paragraphs, please find detailed, easy-to-use instructions on how to construct, master and deploy your very own robot army.

Wait, what?

I don’t… I don’t understand. You don’t want an army of flying buzzbots, programmed to indulge your every whim?

You just want them to do your job better? Seriously?

No, no, that’s OK. I’m not disappointed. More for me.

But seriously, folks. Drones are amazing tools for Realtors, providing an opportunity for detailed, high-quality observation of properties, opening up new security solutions for prospective and current customers, and generally changing the game.

Game,” unfortunately, is the operative word. I’ve been a gamer since DOS and I still can’t run a flight sim without plowing a Learjet into Newark. All that costs me is my save. Getting this “game” wrong means turning hundreds of dollars into scrap and smoke.

Thankfully, for once the expertise is ahead of the implementation.

The Drone Racing League, which turns out is a thing, has a user-friendly, full featured drone flight simulator on the market.

And the best part? It’s not on the market at all.

The DRL already has builds for PC and Mac ready to go, though of course you’ll need a computer that can handle the beast. You’ll also need a controller. The standard input device for professional droning is an RC controller, the stylish great grandson of those black antenna boxes that slammed so many tiny cars into so many walls on so many Christmas mornings.

But DRL has you covered: no specialist controller needed. Just about anything that plays nice with USB will work, including Playstation and Xbox controllers. There’s even online multiplayer, so if you want to get really good at taking pretty pictures of your properties (or like flying bundles of pixels around super fast) dive in.

Drones are flocking in droves to the real estate market, and not just as the first stage of conquest for my robot empire.

High-quality images of your properties are a great way to set yourself apart from the rest of the market.

If you want to know if it’s worth your investment, here’s a great – and free! – way to find out.

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